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THE ART OF ^ 
SEDUCTION 
COMPUTER STYLE 

DRAGON DRUGGIN 
TREASURE HUNT 

A FEAST OF FANTASY INSIDE 

THREE SINCLAIR IK 
WONDER GAMES 

PLUS PROGRAMS FOR PET 
APPLE, TANDY AND MANY MORE 

WIN OUR BEST 

AND TAKE ON SNOOKER S STE 




If you want to feel at home in the 
world of computers,you'll want the be 
home computer in the world 



We live in the age of computers. 

Coming to terms wltn them and 
enjoying them is part of coming to terms 
with the twentieth century. 

A few years ago, a computer would have 
filled a fair-sized room. Now micro tech- 
no logy has allowed Commodore to produce a 
home computer, the VIC 20. that's no bigger 
than a typewriter yet performs miracles. 

F OR BUSIN ESS. OR PLEASURE. 

VIC can keep your diary up to date. 
Teach you mathematics. Play an enormous 
range of video games. Even play a piece of 
music to soothe your worried brow. 

In fact, you and VIC can do almost 
anything better. Keeping records of family 
finances, sorting out and working out 
household accounts, being one step ahead of 
the bank manager or helping your own 
business be more businesslike. 

VIC* THE BEST. BY FAR. 

Contrary to oopular belief, computers 
are really ratfier friendly. VIC is particularly 
easy to understand. It's what the computer 
people call 'user friendly' The typewriter- 
type keyboard Is easy to use. It even tells 
you about mistakes you might make. 

If you're technically minded, here's a 
reminder. VIC has a 5k memory expandable 
to 29k. (That means you can put in an almost 
endless amount of information.) 

But what makes the VIC the best home 
computer by far are features that are just not 
available in most other home computers. 
Features like colour, computer graphics and 
sound. 

PLUG IN AND YO U 'RE OFF. 

VIC plugs in to any television set, colour 
or black and white. (We even fit a 13 amp 



plug, so you can play with VIC right away.) 
You don't have to learn a special language. 
VIC speaks English, just like vou. With the 
help of our handbook, you will begin to feel 
at home to the world of computers in no 
time at all. 

COMPUTER 
SUPERMARKETS 
GUARANTEE. 

Buy through Computer Supermarket 
and you get exactly what's promised. We 
guarantee you that. ; 

Every machine is thoroughly 
tested before its despatched. 
And every machine is guaranteed 
for twelve months on parts and 
labour. (Not that you'll need it, 
of course.) 

In the unlikely event that you 
don't want to keep your VIC. 
Just return it, in its original 
packaging, within 30 days and 
your money will be completely 
refunded. 

F REE PRO GRAMS, 

Apart from the more practical things 
like accounting, and the more pleasurable 




things like video games, you can put VIC to 
literally hundreds of uses. 

There are pre-recorded programs on 
many different subjects. You can develop 
your own programs and store them by using 
ordinary cassette tape. 

The special Commodore cassette 
deck is on offer at only £44.95. If you buy 
VIC and the deck together we'll send you a 
6 program pack to start you off that's 
absolutely free. 

YOUR FUTURE WITH VIC. 

Its a big step into the future. 
Understanding the future. 
Having fun in the future. Even 
saving money in the future. 
Every member of the family, 
especially the young, will feel at 
home with VIC right away. So 
send in the coupon. We're sure 
youH find the best home com- 
puter in the world will make the 
(Terence to you and your family 

Computer Supermarket Ltd., Unit 8, 
SouthfoWs Road, Oakley Hay Industrial 
Estate, Corbv, Northants.Tel: (0536) 744015. 
Reg. No. 2646589. Prestel No. 400400. 



Compute' Supermarket Ltd 

Please accept my order for 

Please wnd me Cauette Decki at £44.95 ir. 



Unit 8, Souihfolds Road. Oakley Hay Industrial Estate. Corby, Northan 
VIC 20\ at £1B9.95 each inclusive oi oaeklnj, carriage and insurance 
Free 6 program cauette rf V>C 2 



• Please debit my Access/Barchycard/Amentan Express/Diners Card. Accour 

endow Cheque/PO 



and Cauette Deck ordered together 



Please altow twenty-one days for delivery 'Credit Card orders can b« telephoned to (0SJ6) 744015 anytime. 
Name Mr/Wry^iM 

Address: 



I 

I COMPUTER SUPERMARKET J 

^Commodore Appointed VIC Dealer Please make rem nunc es payable to Computer Supermarket Reader 4 Account.' 



Signature 



n 
i 

i 



. 3 JANUARY 1982 




COM1EM1S 



NEXT MONTH 



QCIENCE Fiction provides a fund of interesting and 
° original ideas. Next month author David Langtord 
begins an irregular column which will silt through 
the best of these and suggest new ideas tor compu- 
ter games writers. 

OUR second look at Christmas 1982 and the toys 
and games which will capture our hearts 10 
months from now — including one of the 
generation"chip-board"game8. Dark Tower. 



page 



MAILBAG ■ -•• • • 

Problems, praise, comments and criticism 

COMPETITIONS ■ - : ■ —^P^e 9 

Last chance to enter our Best Arcade Player Competition 

FOUR OCTAGONS PUZZLE -pag* 16 

We present oui program to solve the tree punle - how does 
yours match up against it? 



. - page 

What could you be playing in 1982? We catalogue the latest 
computer games packages 

CHESS •■ "paae 27 

Some classic computerised blunder.. Max Bramer proves that 
computers are only human alter all 

BRIDGE .page 29 

Alan Hiron deals out some history on computerised bridge 

ARCADE ACTION • • ,J> a 9 e 30 

Reports on the arcade game tipped as a winner tor BZ 

SPEED RACE P aao 32 

Grand Prix thrills on the T.I. 99 4 

CHANGING HEARTS ....J>qg » 34 

A marvellous pattern puzile on the Atari to test your logic 

TANK BATTLE • page 36 

The Sharp screen becomes a battle f told as tank commander, 
stalk one-another 

TREASURE HUNT page 40 

Danger lurks in the deepest roceMM oJ your Apple 

DRAGON DRUGGIN' ...page 50 

lt'% wizardry against dragon's breath as fantasy linds its way 
onto your Pet 

L tp E page 55 

A classic computer game. Put Lite in your Atom 

ENTRAPMENT P°.9* 58 



22 



new 



-TAKE on the African bush in Dr Livingstone, an I Can you |h i nk on lh . ^ ^ box in your opponent before 
1 adventure to find the famous Victorian explorer I no tr a ps you. For the quick-witted on the Tandy 
qets top billing next month. You can also key-in a 
Dogfight, Grand Prix and Nimbot. to name a few. 



Editor Tony Pratt 



Assistant editor Elspeth Joiner 



Editorial assistant Susan Cameron 
Art director Paul Flint 



Design Lind a Freeman 

Advertisement manager Simon Teuyei 



Advertisement executives Rita Lewis. Neil Wood 



Advertisement assista nt Louise Flockhart 
Publisher Tom Moloney 



Editorial and advertisement .fflcee: Duirant House. B Herbal H.ll London 
EC 1R MB; Telephone Editor.al 01-276 6556. Advertising 01-279 6552 



COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAMES POSTAL SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE 

Bv using the special Postal Subscription Service, copies of COMPUTLM 
AND VIDEO GAMES can be mailed diiect from our offices each BOBttte 
any address throughout the world. All subscripts appUcat.ons should be 
sent to. processing to COMPUTER AND «DEO GAMB^ubKnpnon 
Deoaxtmentl. EMAP NATIONAL PUBLICATIONS LTD.. BRECON COURT. 
BRETTON. PETERBOROUGH. PE3 8DZ. All orde.s gS^SJS^SLS 
approbate rem.ltcnc* made payable to COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAMES. 

Annual subscription tales (12 issues): 
UK and Eire 
Overseas surface mail 
Airmail Europe 

Additional serv.ee into. mat ion including individual overseas airmail 
rates available upon request. 

Published and distributed by EMAP National Publications Ltd. 
Printed by Eden Fisher (Southend) Limited, 
g) Computer & Video Games Limited 

ISSN 0261 3697. 



£10.00 
£12.00 
E20.00 



Mole, Swag and Android Attack, three reason, to unwrap tbot 
Christmas Sinclair 

THE BUGS -page 63 

A mangled micro ... a recurring threat .0 Sanla ... who can 
be lo blame? ^ ^ 

m^ft^th* r^hma«? Keith Campbell did and 
may never be the same again 

BRAIN WARE "£ a 9 e ^ 

Ian Pedders iirst Mind Routines puxxle had the beating ol 
most of you — now try his January brainteaser 

KIT KORNER P aae 68 

Keith Mott owls the skin oil a Tangerine 

WHAT'S IN STORE • • ■ >»»?yy : 72 

Counting oil the shopping days left to Chn.tma. M pfl 
Well the toy industry is. We reveal some of its plans 

PRACTICAL PROGRAMMING page 

Ted Ball is on the trail of the Bugs 

SOFTPORN 

We uncover the seamier side of computers. Elspeth Joiner 
tries one ol the new generation of pornographic games 

VIDEO SCREEN «y.y PfSL 

Best sellers - we look at the cartridges which load the 
market. This issue, lntollivision's Soccer 

SOUNDS..'. .......page 81 

David Annal investigates a "microchip orchestra 

[GRAPHICS UV^g B" 

Garry Marshall's invader is up and running. Now shoot it 

DOWN TO BASIC P°9 e 84 

Moira Norrie looks at loops and graphics 

REVIEWS - - - ■ P° ae 86 

FoUow in Daley Thompson's Decathlon footsteps 

I SOFTWARE GLOSSARY page 90 

HARDCORE paggjjg. 



■ unHinnHf. ""J—^- 







m 




TRS 80GENIE SOFTWARE 



from the professionals 



Mysterious Adventure 

GOLDEN BATON 




?: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : X'X':-x-:':-:-;-; 



Three months ago we introduced the Mysterious Adventure series, a brand new series of machine language 
Adventures written by Brian Howarth. The (irsl one, The Golden Baton, was greeted with enthusiasm by 
experienced and beginner Adventurers alike. Now the second and third in the series, The Time Machine and 
Arrow of Death, are available. The Arrow of Death, although entirely self-contained, is the first of a two part 
Adventure. The second part will be available early in the new year. 

Mysterious Adventures are available for Models I and III TRS-80 and Models I and II Video Genie, both on 
tape <16K minimum) or disk (32K 1 disk minimum). A TRS-80 Model II version will be available shortly. 

Any 1 Adventure: On tape £10.06 Any 2 Adventures: On tape £18.40 

On disk £12.65 On disk £23.00 

All prices are inclusive of V.A.T. Please add 50p for P. & P. 



MOLIMERX LTD 

A J * A J HARDING (MOLIMERX) 

B1 BUCKHURST ROAD, TOWN HALL SQUARE, BEXHILL-ON-SEA. EAST SUSSEX. 
TEL: [0424] 220391/223636 TELEX 86736 SOTEX G 

TRS-80 & VIDEO GENIE SOFTWARE CATALOGUE £1 .00 [refundable] plus 50p postage 




4 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




GLOSSARY PUT TO 
GOOD USE 

Dear Sir. 

Being an Atari owner, I bought 
your magazine and was quite 
amazed at the possible applica- 
tions computers can be put to. 

I now day-dream of owning 
one of my own so have entered 
this tongue-in-cheek attempt, 
not knowing the slightest thing 
about Basic, but having digested 
the software glossary; 
PUZZLE SOLUTION — RUNS ON 

4 CUPS OF COFFEE + 

PACKET OF CIGARETTES 
GOTO — quiet room when 

family have gone to bed 
INPUT — 1st cup of coffee and 

cigarette 
CURSOR — hundred times 

when random juggling fails 

to solve puzzle 
INPUT — further cup of coffee + 

cigarette 
RAM — head against wall for 

spilling coffee on puzzle 
VARIABLE — success - only 3 

sides matching 
POKE — cat for mixing up 

cards thinking I wanted to 

play with him 
OUTPUT — cat into garden 
PEEK — at next-door-neighbour 

getting undressed with 

curtains open 
RUN — indoors pretty quick 

when spotted by husband 
DE-BUG — caused by much 

head scratching after further 

unsuccessful attempts 
DISC — perhaps soothing 

music might help 
LOOPY — if I don't solve it soon 
INPUT — more coffee + 

cigarettes 
LANGUAGE — getting pretty 

blue now 
RESISTOR — temptation to give 
in 

(H1ARRAY! — I've done it 
INPUT — 4th cup of coffee + 
last cigarette 

It's the honest TRUTH-VALUE 
as well. I'm not STRINGing you 
along, it's a GRAPHIC account of 
what happened. I'd thought I'd 
GO-SUBmit this to your EDITor 
by putting it in the post box 
FORTRANsit to you. 



If you have a CAPACITOR for 
generosity you might PRINT this 
and send me some £££ — or even 
a microcomputer! 
D. J. Sparke, 
Ravensthorpe, 
Peterborough. 

THE INVADERS 
MYSTERY-SOLVED 

Dear Sir, 

First of all. I would just like to 
say what a superb first issue the 
Computer & Video Games was; 
as a beginner, I look forward to 
buying the magazine regularly. 




Anyone who is addicted to 
"Space Invaders" will tell you 
that when the little green 
"meanies" get a little too low for 
comfort it can be quite a struggle 
to clear them off the screen when 
you only have one laser base 
left. Well, here is a tip which will 
amaze onlookers and make 
things a great deal easier. 

If there are only 10 to 15 
"invaders" left but are extremely 
low (not so low as to allow you to 
pass underneath without risk of 
losing a base) and your _ laser 
base is to the left of them and the 
"invaders" are going right, try 
firing at the second and third 
bases. Doing this will mean you 
get a "deflection" i.e. the 
"invaders" on the second row up 
will be shot thus killing some of 
them without you being near 
them. (Amazing eh?). 



MORE LETTERS 
on Page 7 



This trick is best appreciated 
being done and will help build 
up your score. Also, some people 
don't realise that you can 
become proficient in obtaining 
300 points from the "mystery" 
space ship. First of all. fire 22 
lasers, wait, and shoot the mys- 
tery saucer with the 23rd shot. 
From then on, shoot the mystery 
ship with the 15th shot. Doing it 
this way will enable you to 
obtain a high score quickly. (I 
frequently score 3390 points on 
the first sheet!) 

Another tip, don't shoot the 
invaders in the middle first but 
get the ends first, that way the 
invaders won't come down so 
quickly. 
Ian Clark, 
Dalton, 
Huddersfield, 
Yorkshire. 

Editor's reply: Thanks for the tips 
Ian, some. I'm sure, many Bpace 
invaders' players know already, 
others may prove a real eye- 
opener. Now a question for you, 
do you know how to get a Rain- 
bow on Space Invaders Part II? 

DISCIPLINE 
SNAG JNR. 

Dear Sir, 

Firstly let me congratulate you 
on an original and interesting 
magazine. But there is an error 
in line 200 of Keith Campbell's 
Adventure column (December 
issue). 

Please discipline Snag Jnr. 
before you write any more pro- 
grams as he may well become 
another Screaming Foul-up. 
Simon Balfre, 
Kingston -upon -Thames. 

Keith Campbell replies: A typo- 
graphical error did creep into the 
second column in line 200. It 
should have read: 
200 IF MID$ (E$(LN).U> = R$ 
THEN LN VAL 
(MID$(D$(LN).I.l)):GOTO 160 

Another point on last month's 
column. I used READ and DATA 
to set up arrays — sorry Sinclair 
owners! You will have to directly 
assign the array e.g. LET 
L$(0) - "COTTAGE". 

COMPUTER 8r VIDEO GAMES 5 



PET 
SOFTWARE 

BIATMM ATTACK 

The Dialrons are a mean bunch of aliens. They have 
no use for what they are stealing from you (your 
diamonds), but nevertheless, their guiding principle is 
to 'steal first' and ask questions later. 
This offends your moral standards so much that you 
have no hesitation in using your terrible spikes. 
See them beam down and squawk. Sharpen up your 
reflexes and beat back the waves of descending Dia- 
trons. 

16K (New Rom) 
£8.95 

3ub Gommctnbcr 

This is not an Arcade type game but it is a real time 
graphics simulation of the commander of a World War 
II sub. Your mission as commander is to seek out and 
destroy enemy shipping, both warship and mer- 
chantmen. 

The merchantmen are not always sitting ducks as Q 
ships are also encountered but radar, periscopes, 
hydrophone etc. with a good visual display enable 
you to hunt effectively. 

Don't forget to contact your supply ship as running 
out of fuel or ammunition is rather embarrassing to a 
commander in line for the IRON CROSS. 

GOOD HUNTING 

32K and 16K versions (New Rom) 
Please specify £13.95 

CONQUEROR 

A tyrant is sweeping through Europe unopposed. 

GORVAN THE TERRIBLE is well named. You have 
been put in command of the armies which control the 
few remaining countries of the alliance. 
Mere survival will be difficult but your task is to 
eradicate GORVAN from the face of Europe. 

The prize? — fame and glory 

To fail? — Gorvan is indeed terrible 

A game of tactics and strategy played with excellent 
graphical representation of Europe. 

16K (New Rom) 
£12.95 



ASTEROIDS- 



Fast action Pet version of popular arcade type game 
Asteroids'. All the facilities. Rotate, Fire, Hyperspace, 
Jump. 

(Old and New Rom) 
on one cassette 

8k £9.95 



TRS-80, APPLE 
SOFTWARE 

Are you (ed up with games where you just shoot a few 
invaders or depend on your reactions, then try a whole new 
world of computer fantasy, a world in which Sorcery and 
Monsters holds sway, try: 

SORCERER 
OF SIVA 

A real-time GRAPHIC adventure 

Sorcerer of Siva is a game where you enter a different world 
where Amulets, rings, necklaces, sceptres — and — oh, yes. 
a pair of old boots await you — in the magical mines of Siva. 

Enter the dark stillness of the mine, armed with just a 
dagger and relying on your magical abilities. But beware of 
the wandering soulless creatures that dwell in the magical 
mine, guarding every treasure and trap door. 

Use your magical powers to slay the bloodthirsty banshee, 
put an end to the deadly demon, or the goblin waiting to 
waylay you. 

Walk through walls and sealed entrances, cast a spell to 
heal your wounds, regain your strength or hurl bolts of 
lightning. 

A wizard you are, yes. but watch out for the evil Sorcerer 
who is waiting to cast his favourite spell — forgetfulness — 
to deprive you of your most valuable magic. 

But all is not lost — you may regain a spell or two, or 
perhaps even one new to you — if you can discover the 
wondrous touchstones, stone saturated with powers to 
restore your magical abilities. Be warned too, that not all 
treasures you might find are true. In experience lies wisdom. 

£15.95 TRS-80 & V.G. (level II. 16k) cassette 

£17.95 TRS-80 (32k TRSDOS), Apple (48k with Applesoft in 
ROM) 

•a******************** •**•• 

The Upper Reaches of Apshai . . . 

... is the first in a series of expansion modules for 'The 
Temple". Horrible monsters lurk in the innkeeper's backyard. 
Discover the secrets of Benedic's Monastery and the cottage 
of Merlis the Mage. Who knows what secrets the cellar of 
Olias holds. 

Over 150 new rooms for you to explore. 

The Keys of Acheron 

For those of you who have succeeded in rescuing Brynhild as 
the Hellfire Warrior, now have an even more difficult task. 
Four magical jewels, the keys, each in a different dimension, 
must be recovered from Kronus the Demon. 

Both The Upper Reaches of Apshai and The Keys of 
Acheron are expansion modules for the Temple and Hellfire, 
you must have these games to play them. 

£11.95 TRS-80 & V.G. (level II, 16k) cassette 
Temple of Apshai £16.95 
Hellfire Warrior £16.95 

SPECIAL OFFER: If you don't have Temple or 

Hellfire, then purchase both Temple and The Upper Reaches 
of Apshai or Hellfire Warrior and the Keys of Acheron for just 

£24.95 Cass. £26.95 disk. 



All prices include p & p and V.A. T. 



MKLGRAY 

ALGRAY House, 33 Bradbury Street Barnsley, South Yorkshire. 

Tel: Barnsley (0226) 83199 




6 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




TO FIT 2K OR 
NOT TO FIT 2K 

Dear Sir, 

Recently. I read about the Sin- 
clair ZX81 kit, and I found out 
that it was possible to fit a 4816 
2K x 8 RAM in 28-pin pack in the 
RAM location instead of the 
normal IK. What I would like to 
know is where to get this 2K RAM 
from and how much it would 
cost? 

1 have also heard a rumour 
that it is possible to fit a 5K RAM 
instead at a cost of £19.95. Is it 
true? If so could you give me 
more details and what effect 
would it have in conjunction 
with the 16K RAM pack, i.e. what 
final K would it have? 
V. Napolitano, 
Slough, 
Berks. 

Our expert replies: You are cor- 
rect in assuming that the ZX81 
can take a 2K RAM in place of the 
two 2114s or the one 4118 used 
now as the IK memory. The 4816, 
2K by 8 RAM is available through 
Pronto Electronics Systems, 
446-478 Cranbrook Road, Gants 
Hill. Ilford. Essex. The chip is 
made by Mostek. MK 4816. The 
one-off price is about £30, which 
is excessive! 

As to your other enquiry, there 
are several versions of expand- 
able memory which will slot onto 
the back connector of the ZX81 in 
place of the Sinclair 16K RAM 
pack. These vary from 3K up to 
64K at a cost of £9 to £110 respec- 
tively. This makes the 16K RAM 
pack look rather expensive. 

The maximum amount of 
usable memory would seem to 
be 64K although it appears that 
there is a 128K expansion board 
available using a paging sys- 
tem. 



A PACK OF 
PROBLEMS 



If you have a comment or idea for 
Computer & Video Games we would 
like to hear from you. 

Please drop us a line at: Computer 
& Video Games, EMAP. Durrani 
House. 8, Herbal Hill, London EC1R 



Dear Sir, 

Having purchased the ZX81 and 
16K RAM Pack, I have experi- 
enced the following: 
1) The P.S.U. as supplied with 
the kit was intermittent. This 



was due to a broken leg on the 
transformer LT winding. 

2) The basic (no pun) unit 
crashed after a couple of 
hours' use. 

Due I believe, to excessive 
heating of the Voltage Reg- 
ulator — it appeared that heat 
was affecting the 8K ROM? 

Having fitted a larger area 
of heat sink this problem 
seems to be eliminated. 

3) During periods of program- 
ming the machine, with the 
16K RAM attached, the whole 
"caboodle" crashes. To this, 
at the moment, 1 have found 
no simple answer. 

So, the area of my concern at 
this time is to find an answer to 
the 16K problem. 

It is not easy for me to return 
the pack to Sinclair as I have 
delved into the workings. To 
help cure picture jitter of graph- 
ics I have fitted 0. 1 Fd capacitors 
to the remaining memory chips. 
This modification has "cured" 
that problem. However, in the 
course of trying to solve problem 
three, I have broken the wire 
ribbon connecting the two 
boards together. I've replaced 
this with a different ribbon 
altogether and so, probably, 
invalidated the warranty. 

So. perhaps your resident 
expert, or other readers could 
provide an answer to what 
appears to be a nationwide 
dilemma. 
R. L. /. Winson, 
Mortimer, 
Reading, 
Series. 

Our expert replies: I have come 
across the problems you' have 
suffered many times and, with 
some success, have managed to 
sort them out. 

The problem of the system 
crashing has been one which 
has plagued many and the only 
explanation I have been able to 
find is that through entering a 



long program the external RAM 
pack becomes a little loose. This 
leads to spurious signals reach- 
ing the 2X81 which causes the 
system to crash. One way of fix- 
ing the fault, literally, is to 
attack the pack with super-glue. 
This however, is rather drastic 
unless you intend never to move 
the unit. The more temporary 
measure is to support the pack 
with a thin book or whatever 
while you are programming. 

If, however, this does not cure 
the problem do not hesitate to 
return the pack to Sinclair, who 
in the past have repaired items 
which do not look like ZX8U at 
all. 



CRASHING 
ALIENS 



Dear Sir, 

I am an avid 14-year-old com- 
puter addict . In my school we have 
a Research Machine 380Z which I 
use frequently. 

In the last issure of Computer 
& Video Games you published an 
Invaders program for the Nas- 
com 2. After making the neces- 
sary language changes from 
Nasbasic, I ran the program but 
unfortunately it crashed. 

So please would you kindly 
either print an invaders program 
for the 380Z or let me know where 
to obtain one. 
Ronald Lewis 
Aldrington Road 
Streatham 
London SW10 

Editor's reply: You can find a 
source from which to obtain an 
invaders program by scanning 
the adverts from suppliers of 
software for the RM 380Z, Ronald. 
I'm not so sure that this is the 
best use to which a school micro 
can be put: I hope that you 
wouldn't prevent anyone from 
using the machine for school 
work, or even to develop their 
own programs, by playing space 
invaders! 

The problem of translating a 
program from one dialect of 
Basic to another, is such a com- 
mon one that a book has been 
written to help people to do it. 
The Basic handbook by David A 
Lien (Compusoft Publishing, 
1978) lists the corresponding fea- 
tures of many Basic dialects, 
including several of those 
implemented on micros. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 7 




Adda Computers Ltd., a major supplier of computer systems 
lo industry and business, have opened the Vic Centre in 
West London. Here you can see. discuss and buy everything to do with 
the new VIC 20 personal computer— in person or by mail. Hardware 
t> software, technical advice and information is available from an experienced 

* staff. Even if you already own a VIC 20, get on our mailing list to 
m know about new developments Remember— everything has the backing of 
w Adda's reputation, and there's a full 12-month warranty on all hardware 
The Vic Centre is easy to reach — Just off the A40. close to North Acton tube 



Not just a computer but a whole 
expandable system 



AT ONLY £189-95 inc.VAT. Special cassette deck 
£44-95 inc.VAT. 

The VIC-20 is a fully fledged, easy-to-use computer. It's the core 
of a great expandable system. 

* EXPANDABLE MEMORY — UP TO 32K, USING PLUG-IN 
MODULES 

* DISK DRIVE/CASSETTE-FOR EXTERNAL STORAGE. 

* PRINTER— 80 COLUMN, 30 CHARACTERS-PER SECOND 
First time users can operate it immediately with plug-in program 
cartridges, and using your own colour T.V. to get up to 24 
colours on screen, four different sound tones and even write 
your own programs in BASIC. The VIC-20 lets you build a system 
as needs and budget dictate, so that your VIC-20 can be more 
than just a personal computer. 

VIC MEMORY 3K £44.85 

Small size— low cost memory expansion 
Plugs into Vic and reproduces memory-port 
Can be used with other expansions gives a 
total of 6k user static ramon Vic 
FEATURE This board allows Vic to move 
Basic to begin at 1024 ($0400) as in Pet, 
and enables the use ot HIGH RESOLUTION 
COLOUR GRAPHICS 

VIC-LIGHT PEN £28.75 

This high quality fight pen works in both 
normal and Hi-Res modes on the Vic 
allowing simple interaction with the Vtc 
without keyboard entry 
Easy lo program and easy to use. 
e.g. Menu selection. Non-keyboard entry 
Teaching Games 

FEATURE touch sensitive "Enter" contacts 
lo eliminate accidental entry. 

VIC-RS232 INTERFACE £56.35 

Fully implemented (Hue levels) 
RS232C-V24 

BI DIRECTIONAL INTERFACE 

Allows Vic to work as Mainframe Terminal 
Drive a Oume Oaisywheet or a Paper Tape 
Punch etc etc. 

FEATURE This unit contains master power 
supply which supports Vic s own supply 
when carrying Memory Expansions. 
Cassette Drives. Light Pens. Primers etc. 
VIC JOYSTICK Single £14.95 

Hand-Held joystick units 'or games use 
available in Pair or Single configuration. 
N.B. (2 Singles will not work as a pair 
unless modified! 

VIC Games Port Adaptor Cable £19.85 

A two into one adaptor lor use wiin both 
loysticks and light pens A must for those 
who require full control of games with 
graphics. 

FEATURE low-cost High quality Robust 






VIC-20 DOT MATRIX PRINTER 

Tractor feed. 80 characier-per-hne. 30 
haracters-per-second 
VIC SINGLE FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 
3K RAM CARTRIDGE 
8K RAM CARTRIDGE 
t6K RAM CARTRIDGE 
PROGRAMMERS AID CARTRIDGE 
—an extension of BASIC to aid programming 
and de bugging 

MACHINE CODE MONITOR CARTRIDGE 

—Includes assembler and dis-assembier 
capabilities. 

SUPER EXPANDER HIGH RESOLUT CARTRIDGE 

-permits use of nigh resolution graphics. 



£229.99 



C P.O. A. 
£29.95 
£4495 
£74.95 
E34 95 



£34 95 
£34.95 





VIC software Each of these tapes E14.95 
CodebreakerfCodemaker 

You play the VIC or the VIC plays you in this computerised 
version of Mastermind. 
VIC Seawoll, VIC Trap and Bounce-oul 
3 fun games, a submarine shoot out. a beat the ViC and an 
old favourite pub game Good games with different skill levels 
Monster Maze and Maths Hurdler 

A fun game with good colour and sound and a mental anihmeti 
learning game. Highly rated by everyone we have shown it to. 
Harder than you think. 

Canyon Fighter. Tunesmllh. Star Woll at £5.95 

each 

VIC GAMES CARTRIDGES at £19.95 

Fruit Machine. Lander. Road Rally, Allen, Avengers. Pokei 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: All goods sold subiect to Adda 
terms and conditions of sale. Full details available on 
request, but Include: 7 day money back guarantee. Adda 
12 month hardware warranty. Please allow 21 days 
for delivery Allow 7 days 'or personal cheques to be 
cleared Quoted prices era Inclusive of VAT. 



Goods Required 



Pnce 



MAIL ORDER to Adda Computers Limited. FREEPOST London 
W13 0BR or telephone your order (24 hours 
01-992 9904 quoting your BARCLAVCARD o 

number 

■ I •"close a cheque mads 
to Aooa Computet s 



Add £2.00 p & p. for 
orders under £50.00 
Name: 



Total E 



mtted ioi 



CVG 3 



SHOP ADDRESS Adda Home Computers Ltd 
154. Victoria Road. Acton. London W3. Tel 01-992 9904 (Nta 
OPEN: 10 am— 6 pm (Tuesday— Friday! 10 am— 5 pm iSaturdavi 




1 Pieas* cnd'Uc my Ba'ciay'Accets 
account My account number is 



' Please add my namn lo »o 
mailing lit I 

* Deieip as app»e 



8 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




Current world snooker champion, 
Steve Davis, has two loves His first 
love is naturally enough the game ot 
snooker which has brought him 
tame, riches and allowed him to 
indulge his second love — space 
invaders. 

Steve is a keen player of arcade 
games and is often pictured relaxing 
between games in a snooker champ- 
ionship, by having a quick 20ps 
worth on whichever game the 
organisers of the event have been 
good enough to install close-by. 

But on 26 January, Steve has been 
good enough to take time off from a 
snooker tournament to take part in 
our Best Arcade Player in the World 
Competition. 

Steve will be along to watch the 
finalists in action — and maybe pick 
up a few tips on the featured games 
— and also take on the winner at the 
mystery final game which will be 
one not so far seen in the arcades ol 
Britain. 

Our guess is that Steve will have 
his work cut out but look forward to 
seeing him in action on the 26th. 



TO 



TAKE ON 
THE ARCADE 
WORLD 



The search is on to find the 
roughest, toughest, fastest, 
deadliest, alien assassin 

around. 

If you are blasting more 
space-invaders, galaxians or 
asteroids than anyone in your 
pub or arcade, this is your last 
chance to tell the world about 
your talent. 

Whatever your favourite 
machine, send us in your best 
score and you could be on your 
way to the finals of the Best 
Arcade Player in the World 
Competition. 

In conjunction with Taito Elec- 
tronics we are trying to find the 
best galaxian-blaster, puckman 
muncher, asteroid annihilator or 
invader halter going — and give 
him the acclaim he is due. 

The competition is very easy to 
enter, simply fill in the machine 
you wish to enter on and take the 
form down to your local pub or 
arcade. Put the best score you 
can on the machine, ask the pub 
or arcade owner to sign it and 
send it off to us. 

Should you find yourself pro- 
ducing a disappointing score 
simply try again. 

The highest scores on the 10 



most popular machines will 
appear in our Arcade Action sec- 
tion to give the rest of the arcade 
world something to aim And 
the three top scorers on the three 
most popular machines we hear 
from by 7 January will be invited 
to take part in our Grand Arcade 
Game Final. 



Are you a top arcade player 

I would like to enter the Best Arcade Player in the World Competition. 

The machine I play on is: 

My highest score is: which I scored on (date): 

The manager ot the arcade/pub where I achieved this score was a witness. 

Signature of witness 

Name and address ol arcade/pub 



My name is: 
Address: . . . 



Tel:. 
NOW 



Signed: 



post this form to: Computer & Video Games Limited, 
Durrant House, 8 Herbal Hill, London EC1R 5JB 



The tinals will be taking place 
on Tuesday 26 January. Tickets 
will also be sent to the best 
runners-up to come along and 
enjoy the evening. 

EMAP will pay all the 
expenses of the nine finalists to 
and from the event and, in the 
case of the younger finalists, the 
expenses of a parent as well. 

Taito Electronics have agreed 
to supply the three machines 
which prove most popular, for 
our finalists to do their early bat- 
tles on and they will produce a 
fourth mystery machine for the 
three winners of each section to 
contest the Grand Final on. 

This will be a game new to the 
U.K. market. And it is on this 
machine that our Best Arcade 
Player in the World will immedi- 
ately have to justify his or her 
title by taking on snooker 
champion and space invader 
enthusiast, Steve Davis. 

Steve has quite a reputation as 
an arcade-gamester so it prom- 
ises to be quite a tense tussle. 

If you haven't already entered, 
make sure you don't miss out on 
your opportunity to take on the 
best in the arcade world and fill 
in the card and return it to us. 

COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 9 



ZX 80/81 HARDWARE/SOFTWARE 



ZX KEYBOARD 



A full size keyboard for the 8081. The 
keyboard has all the 80/81 functions on the 
keys, and will greatly increase your pro- 
gramming speed. It is fitted with push type 
keys as in larger computers. 
The keyboard has been specially designed for 
the Sinclair computer and is supplied ready- 
built. It also has facilities for 4 extra buttons 
which could be used for on/off switch, reset, 
etc. £27.95 




4K GRAPHICS ROM 



The dK Graphic module is our latest ZX81 accessory. This module, unlike most other 
accessories fits neatly inside your computer under the keyboard. The module comes ready 
built, fully tested and complete with a 4K graphic ROM. This will give you 448 extra 
pre-programmed graphics, your normal graphic set contains 64. This means that you now 
have 512 graphics and with there inverse 1024. This now turns the 81 into a very powerful 
computer, with a graphic set rarely found on larger more expensive machines. In the ROM 
are lower case letters, bombs, bullets, rockets, tanks, a complete set of invaders graphics 
and that only accounts for about 50 of them, there are still about 400 left (that may give you 
an idea as to the scope of the new ROM). However, the module does not finish there; it 
also has a spare holder on the board which will accept a further 4K of ROM/RAM. IT NEEDS 
NO EXTRA POWER AND WORKS FROM YOUR NORMAL POWER SUPPLY. £27.95 



RAM 80/81 



16K RAM 

Massive add-on memory for 80/81. 
16K KIT-A-KIT VERSION 

of a 16K Ram. Full instructions included. All memory expansions plug into the user port at 
the rear of the computer. 16K RAM £42.95 16K KIT £32.95 
2K & 4K RAM 

Static Ram memory expansion for the 80/81 . They both work with onboard Ram i.e. 4K plus 
onboard = 5K. This is the cheapest small memory expansion available anywhere. 2K RAM 
£15.95. 4K RAM £22.95 



16K 81 SOFTWARE 



As seen at the ZX Microfair. 

DEFLEX This totally new and very addictive game, which was highly acclaimed at the 
Microfair, uses fast moving graphics to provide a challenge requiring not only quick 
reaction, but also clever thinking. One and two player versions on same cassette. C3.95 
3D3D LABYRINTH You have all seen 3D Labyrinth games, but this goes one stage beyond; 
you must manoeuvre within a cubic maze and contend with corridors which may go 
lehyright/up/down. Full size 3D graphical representation. £3.95. 

CENTIPEDE. This is the first implementation of the popular arcade game on any micro 
anywhere. Never mind your invaders, etc., this is positively shining, the speed at which this 
runs makes ZX invaders look like a game of simple snap. £4.95. 
Please add £1 p&p for all hardware, Software p&p free. Specify ZX80/81 on order. 
ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE COVERED BY A MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



cK'tronics 



23 Sussex Road, Gorleston, 
Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. 
Telephone: Yarmouth (0493) 602453 



10 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



■moNBWPiniwi 




DELUGE US 
WITH GAMES 



Only with your help can we con- 
tinue to make Computer & Video 
Games a worthwhile purchase. 

Our existence as a magazine 
depends on you. the readers, 
deluging us with games pro- 
gram listings which you have 
invented for your own micro- 
computer. 

We are willing to pay £10 ior 
each games listing published. 
Please check your programs 
carefully before you send them 
into us. I know the temptation is 
to look at our creations through 
gold-tinted spectacles, but, just 
before you run it off on the 
printer, check to see that if the 
biggest moron going tried to 
play the game (I may well do so 
when it gets to the office) he 
could do so without crashing it. 

Another please now: Please do 
not send us programs that you 
have copied from professional 
tapes or spotted in other publica- 
tions, these may be spotted by 
our eagle eyes or they may slip 
through and cause untold prob- 
lems. 

If possible could you include a 
cassette of the game so that we, 
i , one of our review team, can 
iiy it out and give a rundown 
on just how good it is. 

Each month we will be picking 
out a couple of programs and 
giving a briefing on how they 
were put together. What the vari- 
ables are doing and how the 




PARIS AWAITS OUR 
REST PROGRAMMER 

You could be in a position to treat a 
friend to a weekend in Paris — 
complete with spending money — 
next year. 

That is the prize (or the best 
games program listing sent into us in 
the first 12 months of this magazine's 
life. 

Paris may not be the games capi- 
tal of the world but it does have its 
attractions and, when you are spend- 
ing our money, I'm sure it will be all 
too easy to turn what could have 
been "just another weekend", into 
the weekend of a lifetime. 

Come next October a panel of 
judges will sit down to play all the 
best games which have been sent 
into us. They will take into account 
the originality of the game, the use of 
the facilities that particular com- 
puter has to offer, payability, pro- 
gramming prowess and presenta- 
tion. 

Just about anyone — apart Irom 
myself, can enter — and win the 
weekend in Paris. There is also the 
prestige of being heralded as a top 
games writer. Who knows where 
that could lead? 



programmer has overcome cer- 
tain problems with an idea that 
other readers could adopt to 
their machines. 

So if you could also enclose 
with your listing, a brief run- 
down of how to play the game; 
whether it can be played by one. 
two or more people. 

A brief synopsis of what the 
game is about will also be of 




BRAINWARE ANSWERS 




The train was 22 minutes early in 
our second Mind Routines prob- 
lem and the commuter and his 
faithful wife lived 11 miles from 
the station. British Rail have 
since informed us that it was 
actually the previous train 38 
minutes late. 

The solution to Nevera's 
December crossword is printed 
right. We will publish the names 
of the winners next issue. 

The month's Brainware prob- 
lems are on page 67. 




IVl 


r 
■ 








m 




m 






N 


^^^^ 




U 






P 





benefit, and a list of what the 
variables or certain subroutines 
are doing. 

So whether you have written a 
massive adventure in 48K for 
your Apple, or a IK bat and ball 
program for the Sinclair ZX81, 
we are waiting to hear from you. 

I'm sure there must be plenty 
of easier ways to earn a tenner 
but are there any as rewarding? 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES' free 
competitions are open to anyone 
except EMAP employees and their 
relatives. 

Entries to our Mind Routines. 
Nevera Crossword. Know your Crea- 
tures, Game of the Year and Arcade 
Player of the World competitions, 
should be sent to COMPUTER & 
VIDEO GAMES. Durrani House. B 
Herbal Hill. London EC1R 5JB 
Judges' decisions are final and no 
correspondence can be entered into. 

Send entries to Mind Routines on 
a postcard and in all cases please 
include a name, address and, where 
possible, a telephone number. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 1 1 



KNOW YOUR 
CREATURES/3 



no 




TAKE TAITO'S 

INVADERS 

PRISONER 

It is usually kill or be killed with 
the relentless Space Invaders, 
but we are now ottering you a 
chance to take some prisoner. 

An infinite number of these 
deadly aliens have been signed 
up to do duty on the Taito Elec- 
tronics Space Invader machine 
which will go to the winner of 
our Know your Creatures com- 
petition. 

The aliens will, of course, be 
safely locked away in a cocktail 
table, ready to do battle at a 
moments' notice. 

Six creatures have already 
appeared in the last two issues 
of Computer & Video Games for 
you to put a name to. If you can 
also tell which machine these 
last three arcade inhabitants 
come from, you will be in the 



running for your own Space 
Invaders table. 

For those ot you who missed 
the first two issues, we have 
reprinted the previous six crea- 
tures, to give you a chance to 
enter. 

Simply fill in, beside each crea- 
ture, the name of the machine 
you think he comes from. For 
example, if you think that crea- 
ture "G" comes from a Puckman, 
Pacman or Mazeman machine, 
then simply write any of those 
words beside him and we will 
know what you mean. 

When you have put names 
beside each creature, tell us, in 
not more than 25 words, why you 
think space invaders proved 
such a popular game. Fill in your 
name, address and telephone 
number and send it off to reach 
us no later than 15 January 1982. 
And Taito — the name behind 
the space invaders craze — 
could make your dream of a liv- 
ing room supply of invaders 
come true. 

Be warned, though, that there 
are one or two sneaky creatures 
lurking in the tine-up. 



see 



THAT 
TEMPLATE! 

If you ve mislaid the free tem- 
plate we gave away with our 
December issue, you'd best start 
looking for it now. 

Because that flexible strip of 
plastic has untold uses far 
beyond the one we innocently 
designed it for. 

We thought it might be useful 
for keying-in the games listings 
we print in the magazine but 
offered prizes for the best other 
uses you could think of putting it 
to. 

And after applying a good 
deal of imagination and some 
inspired lateral thinking you 
have proved that a good tem- 
plate is worth its weight in gold 
(about I Op). 

We have selected a few 
bizarre examples at random for 
printing so you can begin to 
draw up a mental picture of your 
fellow Computer & Video Games' 



readers. (Mental is probably the 
operative word.) 

Our template can be used to: 

• Break up the gungy bits which 
inevitably form at the bottom of a 
damp mug when you make 
instant cup soup. 

• Repair squeezy bottles after 
the kids have been watching Blue 
Peter. 

• Scraping mud from your legs 
after a game of football. 

• Beetle flicker! 

• Stop homing pigeons flying 
off by glueing their feet to it. 

• Wear it on your nose in 
Alaska as an amorous eskimo 
repellent. 

• For measuring how far your 
pet snail has travelled in the 
past six hours. 

We will sift through the entries 
to pick out 10 winners for publi- 
cation in the February issue. It 
promises to make entertaining 
reading. 




B 






I think Space Invaders proved 
so popular because: 



Name 

Address 



12 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



Telephone: 



A brand new addition to your family 

the ATARI personal computer 



Powerful ATARI 400 
16K RAM. Measures 
16"x12%"x4% 
Weighs only 9V*\b. 

Only £345. 
(incl VAT 
at 15%). 



mrrrrrrrr 




Now is the lime to jump a generation and add an Atari to your family 
the best in personal home computers. So easy to use and pro- 
gramme yet they fulfil a vital role in the home. Just connect to your 
TV set for sound, colour, high resolution graphics and plig in 
programme modes Dad can play real or imaginary business gaines. 
Mum can swot up on her languages for the next holiday and the 



youngsters can play any amount of games or get help through the 
educational programmes. There is hardly any limit to what you can 
do with an Atari Personal Computer - and how this can develop. 
But there is a limit to the Free Introductory Offer of the 60 minute 
cassette which we will supply when you order an Atari 400 or 800 
model. This offer ends January 31 1982. 




ATARI 800 Advanced power 
and flexibility 

48K RAM same si/e and weight as DM 
400 bul has grcatci potential and 
advanced systems (o> those that 
requite this extra tat ility 
Onlv C$46 <.nc VAT at 15%). 



ATARI Game Controls 

Joysticks, paddles and keyboards 
all readily available 



PROGRAMMING 

Use your 400 or 410 recorder 
to write, store and play your 
own programmes. 



fftefllrlW*! ATARI TOO! 

Play some of the 
most popular games 

V^-Aste roids 
IT^Missile Command 

>sSpace Invaders 

and many more. 



ATARI 410 Programme/ 
Recorder 

Foi use with both the 400 & 800 
models Stores programmes and data, 
plus audio track. Run programmes, 
iisten to voice Of compose music 
throuiih your TV set. 




Check these other features 
and extras 

COLOUR GRAPHICS - 

Plug into TV tot 16 colours 

and 8 intensities 

SOUND From your 
own TV speaker 
KEYBOARD 57 touch keys 

CONTROLS Joysticks. 

Paddles. Keyboards 

GAMES Star Raiders, 

Space Invaders. Chess. 

Basketball _ ask (or our list 

CHARACTERS - 40 by 24 
line display 

PORTABILITY weighs 
only 9% lb. Can be used in 

any room at h om e or office 

IES- Can 

>re d on Atar i - 

:order or Disc brive/800 only 



FREE MANUAL With 
s tep by slop instructions 



0 

E 
® 

® 
® 



Write for full set of colour 
iterature telling you all you need 
to know about ATARI and full price 



ISt 



TERMINAL CONNECTIONS LTD I 



A 

ATARI 



AMECO HOUSE. SECOND WAY 
EXHIBITION HOUSE, WEMBLEY. 
MIDDLESEX HA9 0UA 01-9036821 

See our range of Personal Computers and 
accessories al this London outlet or complex 
coupon and return to us for full set of 
literature. OPEN 6 days a week 9.30 to 5.30. 



I 



To: Terminal Connections Ltd. Dept CV 1 AMECO HOUSE. SECOND WAY 
EXHIBITION HOUSE. WEMBLEY. MIDDLESEX HA9 0UA 
Please send me full details on the ATARI personal Computers 

Name IBLOCK LETTERS! 



Postcode. 




14 COMPUTER 8t VIDEO GAMES 



I 



e; have so many 
1 so much fun. 




Thousands of computers have been programmed 
with new games featured in the new Computer & 
Video Games magazine. 

The results have variously teen hilarity, Amuse- 
ment and profanity. But always fun. 

Some of the games are simply crazy, others 
intellectually challenging. But all are straightforward 
to program with our step-by-step listings. 
You don't have to be an expert either because you 
can brush up (or even leain) programming with our 
regular workshop. 

It doesn't matter what kind of computer you use 
our games cover all shapes and sizes from pei-sonal 
Sinclair's to mainframe IBMs. 

If you have access to a computer, and you enjoy 
playing with it. you'll find something in Computer & 
Video Games to tickle your- fancy You can get the 
January issue now from all good newsagents. 
So go on. Have some fun. 




I would like to Uk« oul unanmuul 
' subscription. I enclose a cheque/ P.O. 

fur £UU £20 overseas) for twelve is>ues. 
Computer & Viileo< lames. Kit *t ton 

Oturt.Bretton.Peterboroagh PE381 »/ 



Nairn- 



A<Miv 



CVG3 



Computer 
& Video Gam 

The magazine that 
1 1 lakes computers fun. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 15 



_ 



The programmed solutions to our 
first issue Four Octagons puzzle have 
been Hooding in. 

Some 300 had been received by 
the time this page had to be put to 
press. (And it was one ol the first to 
go!) We have all been very surprised 
— and impressed — by the standard 
of entry and the amount of work 
many of you have gone to. 

The first program arrived on our 
desk within two days of the first 
issue appearing in the newsagents 
and subsequent solutions have come 
in with some marvellous pieces of 
presentation. From the hand written, 
to those that arrived complete with 
listing, tape and photographs of the 
display, all packaged in a neat file, 
they will all be tried and tested by 
our judges. 

In the meantime here is a chance 
to see how puzzle setter James 
Dalgety of Pentangle, went about 
producing a program to solve the 
puzzle. It runs on a Pet but the 
program has been written, as far as 
is possible, using general Basic lan- 
guage. 




IT IS often fat easier to solve a 
"mechanical" puzzle than it is to 
either prove that the solution is 
unique or specify all the solu- 
tions. 

However at Pentangle, where 
we specialise in manufacturing 
difficult puzzles, it is frequently 
necessary that we do both. 

The first job is to analyse the 
puzzle: there are four octagons 
each of which can contribute one 
of two faces to any solution. 
Each face consists of eight pairs 
of symbols. I decided to split 
these into two groups of four 
pairs of symbols, so I could eas- 
ily adapt the program for use on 
squares in the future. 

The octagons have to be 
placed on a two by two grid, but 
as the puzzle is only to match the 
edges there is no need ( to con- 
sider rotations of the overall 
solution thus one card can 
always be placed on one of the 
four locations and the remaining 
three cards permutated on the 
three remaining locations. 

For every permutation of card 
locations each card must be (a) 



rotated and (b) turned over to test 
each of its 16 edges for a match 
against its two neighbouring 
cards. The total of 393,216 tests 
makes it necessary that the 
program is as fast as possible, 
but publication of the program 
makes it desirable to have 
graphics or a pretty picture. 

I wrote the program for a 3032 
Pet, but being frequently frus- 
trated by coming across pro- 
grams in magazines full of 
PEEKs and POKEs for machines 
other than Pets, I assume other 
readers get equally annoyed. So 
I ruled that I must not use PEEKs 
or POKEs in my program. This 
slowed it down and involved 
some rather untidy programmed 
cursor movements but hopefully 
made it more portable. 
Lines 360-390 hold the data. Each 
symbol has been converted to a 
number from I to 7. (I started 
with card No. 1 numbering it 
clockwise and end up with four 
sets of alternate edges taken 
from the front and back of each 
card.) 

Lines 110-130 define the vari- 



16 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



ables in the order of the fre- 
quency with which they will be 
used. This is done to save 
machine time searching the 
variables. 

Subroutine 710-850 is the 
explanatory preamble followed 
by an option in line 860-870 lor 
users with a printer. (P$ and F 
are solely related to the print 
option which gives hardcopy of 
only solutions, not pretty pic- 
lures.) 

Subroutine 880-1130 provides 
the pretty picture. To save time it 
seemed sensible to overprint this 
with the current status as 
required rather than print it all 
each time. 

This, in fact, led to the neces- 



sity of subsequently using pro- 
grammed cursor movements for 
the overprinting, but these were 
still quicker than printing the 
whole picture and also made it 
possible to get hardcopy of the 
essential data only on the Pet 
printer. 

On the screen option the pro- 
gram waits before displaying a 
solution before continuing, 
whereas on the printer option, it 
continues automatically. To 
save time the current test is only 
shown on the screen when "G" is 
pressed. 

Line 150 directs to the sub- 
routines 400-450 and counts the 
positions 1-6. 

Subroutines 400-450 read the 




data into arrays AS, B$, C$, and 
D$ each containing the four sets 
of mutually exclusive symbols 
used in any one test. The six 
subroutines represent the six 
possible locations of the cards. 
Because numbers are being used 
for the symbols the cards have 
been renamed A, B. C, D, 
instead of 1, 2, 3, 4. to avoid 
confusion. The position is 
recorded in ARS. 

Line 160 starts the loops which 
in line 170 select each of the four 
sets of edges that are to be used. 

Line 180 starts the loops which 
rotate each of the sets of edges 
four times. 

Line 190 skips out to display 
the current test if requested. 

Lines 200-270 test for a match 
of edges and if a no match is 
found skip further matches and 
go to line 290 count the tests in N 
and rotate the cards in lines 300 
and 310 and so on. 

If all edges do match line 280 
directs to the solution display 
and print subroutines. 

Lines 460-480 either prints the 
solution or waits 'til asked to 
display it, using the same sub- 
routine as the current test dis- 
play. 

Lines 490-700 are used to over- 
print the current test or solution 
onto the pretty picture. Edge 
symbols are shown in the 
octogons. The inner letters show 
the location of each card. The 
outer numbers show which set of 
edges is being tested (0 and 1 
being on the front and 2 and 3 the 
reverse). The number of solu- 
tions and tests so far are shown 
together with the average time 
per test (this increases dramati- 
cally the more you took!). 

On being confronted with the 
task of writing a program to 
solve the Four Octagons puzzle; 
my first thought had been "How 
easy!", my second was "How dif- 
ficult" and by the time I had 
finished I was convinced that I 
had set about the whole project 
in the most difficult possible 
way. 

I have subsequently had a 
brilliant idea but as 1 won't be 
allowed to win the prize I will 
keep it secret unless of course I 
am adequately bribed! 

I look forward with great inter- 
est to seeing how other readers 
tackle the puzzle on different 
machines. 



2 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 17 



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COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 19 



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20 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




The Product: 
Apple II 
Europlus 48 K 
The Price: 



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Apple II Europlus 48K - Total Price 776 25 





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COMPUTER * VIDEO GAMES 21 



CLEAN-UP AT 
THE RACES 



HONEST JOE 



A bookie's lile is a hectic one 
and he needs to be shrewd and 
calculating — all eyes, ears and 
hands to make the most out ol 
his business. 

You can try it tor yourself in a 
new game called Honesl Joe. 

Rake in the punters' cash from 
badly placed bets in a mock-up 
race — aim: to make a profit. 
Horses' form lor previous races 
is given by the computer and 
randomly selected In each race. 
You must judge what bets to 
take. 

A recent addition to the 
Molimerx range ot games soft- 
ware for the Tandy TRS-80 16K: 
you can buy it either in cassette 
or disc form, £6.75 and £11.75 
respectively. 




Man the controls of a space- 
cruiser on a bombing mission Hy- 
ing across an undulating horizon, 
to blast targets marked out on 
the landscape below. 

You really need three pairs of 
eyes: to watch out tor targets on 
the ground, the hazardous hori- 
zon dotted with enormous moun- 
tains which come into view with- 
out warning, and the numerous 
alien craft which attack your ship. 

There are four levels of skill for 
you to try your hand at plus 
sound effects which are emitted 
from the keyboard port. Moon- 
raider runs on the Nascom and is 
a version of the arcade game 
Scramble. 

It is produced by Program 
Power of Leeds and costs £8 95 




WILL SIMULATORS TAKE OFF? 



JUMBO JET LANDER 



You can experience the exhilara- 
tion of piloting an aeroplane 
while keeping both feet on the 
ground in Jumbo Jet Lander. 

Learning to take-off, fly and 
land, without leaving your living 
room is now possible with the 
latest piece of innovative soft- 
ware for the Atari personal com- 
puter. 

Using marvellous graphics, 
this game is for the Atari 800 and 
simulates the cockpit of a jumbo 

Complete with hazards, both 
on-board and in the sky, it could 
almost turn into a recreation of 
the recent comedy film Airplane. 

The screen displays a view 
from the pilot's seat and you can 
either select a daylight flight and 
landing or try the more difficult 
night flight 

It requires a controlled mind 
as you take-in the information 



from the many dials displayed 
before you. These register the 
condition of the aircraft through- 
out the flight, to allow pilot to 
monitor his air pressure, flight 
path, height and speed. 

It takes some getting used to 
and it will be some time before 
you become experienced enough 
to land with any confidence. 

In charge of the controls, it's 
your job to rectify anything that 
goes wrong in the flight period. 

This game clocks in at just 
under the £30 mark and many 
purchasers may be put off. But 
the realism and graphics do offer 
a marvellous standard which 
other machines and software 
manufacturers find hard to 
achieve. 

It is produced by Thorn-EMI's 
software arm and follows other 
games Darts, Snooker and Sub 
marine Commander. 



SUPER GLUE 
GALAXIANS 



What do you get when you 
cross galaxians with super glue? 
The answer can be found in 
Program Power's Martians game. 

A metal-clinging species of 
creature lurking in the depths of 
outer space is the evil force at 
work to destroy your galactic 
cruiser. 

If the aliens build up on the 
outside of your own ship with six 
clinging on to it they overcome 
the controls of the cruiser. You 
lose the game and they take 
command. 

The game is said to be inspired 
by the space adventure series 
Blake's Seven A torcefield sur- 
rounding your spaceship is at 
your disposal for defence pur- 
poses. When the held is down, 
the aliens can make a bee line for 
your craft. Beware though, your 
forcefield is not always strong 
enough to protect the ship. 

Some of the sticky creatures 
are imposters in the swarm 
which can be deceiving. Just 
when you think you have stop- 
ped the aliens, an imposter will 
descend disguised amongst the 
rest of the mob. These suddenly 
transform into creatures which 
can penetrate your forcefield 
regardless of its strength. 

The game's points system 
works on the number ot aliens 
you prevent breaking through the 
forcefield. 

Martians is written lot the 
Acorn Atom and a copy in cas- 
sette form costs £7.95. 



DANGER! BIRDS OF PREY 



It's no wonder birds of prey are 
becoming endangered species, 
when they are shot down as fast 
as they are in Falcon 

This version of the arcade 
game Phoenix is another space 
invasion game, putting the player 
up against impossible alien odds. 

Fighting off the Falcons in this 
new Apple game is a herd task 
which has three separate stages 
to test your tactical ability and 
marksmanship. 

The first and second phases of 
the invasion involve the same 



FALCON 



version o* these malicious bird- 
like creatures. In the third phase 
a new and more deadly variety 
takes over the attack. 

And should you survive this 
onslaught, a mothership appears, 
to drop hundreds of Falcons on 
you. 

Falcon costs £16.95 from S.B.D. 
Software but the different levels 
of difficulty will keep up a 
player's interest. 





22 COMPUTER Bt VIDEO GAMES 



J EW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCTS NE1 





SEASONAL SING-SONG 



A HOBBIT'S 
MISSION 

The classic Tolkien lale Lord ol 
the Rings comes to life on your 
television screen in a new adven- 
ture game. 

The Cracks of Doom, is based 
on the story of the adventures of 
Frodo described in the classic 
fantasy book and runs on a 32K 
Pet. There are five objects for 
you to find by interrogating the 
computer, using command words 
to tackle obstacles put in your 
way. 

When you find all the objects 
though, your task is not over. You 
then have to locate the Cracks of 
Doom and drop each item, in 
turn, into the crevasse's depths. 



CRACKS OF DOOM 



Only once the obiects have hit 
the bottom, do the Gods reward 
you 

Hazards encountered on your 
perilous tourney include canyons 
which you must take care not to 
tumble into, and evil creatures 
blocking your path which you 
have to deal with as well as a 
poor hobbit can. if you pick the 
right thing to do, the game goes 
on if not you're dead! 

Recently brought out by 
Supersoft, the Cracks of Doom 
was written by the same author 
of the successful adventure 
game Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Galaxy which has frustrated Pet 
owners the length and breadth of 
the country. 

Anticipating a large demand 
tor the game, Supersoft have 
brought it out on both tape and 
disc with a price tag of CI 6 
attached. 



CAROLS 



Tune into Christmas with a Carol 
cassette to add to the seasonal 
festivities, 

The Carols tape runs on the 
Sharp MZ-80K so you can load 
and listen to up to 20 different 
popular carols. For £5.50 all your 
old favourites are on the cas- 
sette including Good King 
Wenceslas, While Shepherds 
Watched Their Flocks By Night, 
Once in Royal David's City, Ding 
Dong Merrily on High and 0 Little 
Town of Bethlehem. 

It's on sale now from Sharp 
software specialists Newbear. 
Other additions to its Sharp 



range are Quadrax, an imitation 
of the traditional game, Four-in- 
a-Row. This version is in 3-D and 
the object is to get four of the 
same coloured counters slotted 
in one row. You play against 
either the computer or human 
opponents. For those who can 
think in 3-0. It costs £5.50. 

A space invader spin-off is out 
as well. Called, Cosmiad from 
Newbear, it follows the tradi- 
tional game but is more difficult 
because the invaders are more 
erratic than other versions' 
invading forces. It too runs on 
the MZ-BOK and costs C8. 



LIFTING A MAGICAL CURSE 



DRAGON'S EYE 



A new mysterious and complex 
adventure game of necromancy 
looks certain to keep Pet owners 
company in the long nights. 

So complicated are the rules 
and sections of the game that a 
31 page booklet comes with the 
pack. The brief history behind the 
theme of Dragon's Eye is sur- 
rounded by the mysteries of a 
magical art, necromancy. 

A curse was put on a land 
known as the Seven Provinces 
by the Evil Necromancer, who 
held the power to control time. 
Only the player, by entering 



and taking part in this fantasy, 
can wipe out the spell woven 
by the Evil Necromancer. 

At the end of the game, no 
matter how far you have got with 
it, you will be awarded points. If 
you get the honour of receiving 
less than 100 you know you are 
terrible. To achieve the wreaths 
of distinction deserved only by a 
grand master you need to earn 
yourself the grand total of 4000 
to 5999 points. No mean feat. 
Supplier tor this and an Apple 
version is Algray Software; it 
costs £16.95. 




CHILDREN'S 

NURSERY 

FANTASY 

This month marks a departure 
from traditional adventure games 
filled with demons, dragons, 
wizards and warlocks. 

Specially written for children 
the new adventure game, 
Dreamworld, sets nursery 
rhymes as the scene o' action. 

Using well-known nursery 
rhymes, children too can get to 
grips with adventure before mov 




mg on to the more advanced and 
complicated versions on sale. 
And all in the relatively peaceful 

surroundings of children's fan- 
tasy world using simple com- 
mand words to tell the computer 
what to do. 

The Tandy TRS 80 is the 
machine this adventure game 
runs on with 16K of memory It is 
available from TRS-80 suppliers 
Mohmerx of Bexhill-on-Sea for 
£8.75 on tape and £11 95 on disc 
For adult and experienced 
adventure players the firm has 
expanded its Mysterious Adven- 
ture series Time Machine and 
Arrow of Death of which a sec- 
ond part is to follow later. The 
latter is a continuation of the first 
Molimerx adventure, the Golden 
Baton m which the object is to 
recover a stolen baton and 
restore it to its rightful place. In 
the Arrow of Death (1) the baton 
has grown tarnished and has 
been overcome by an evil power 
whose source is unknown. Your 
task is to find and banish the 
source. 

Both cost £875 tor the tape 
version and £11.75 for the disc 

COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 23 



1 1 1 .... Ill 



iiiimuuuuuiuutm 





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Yet. almost unbelievably, the price of Genie I is even lower than that of the original 
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RS232 interface 01 5100 cuds There is 16k 
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The EG 602 pi inter can be connected to the 
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Telephone: 0629 4995. Telex: 377482 Lowlec G. 



NEW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCT 



MISSION OF 
DESTRUCTION 

Guide a crew of World 
War II submarine men 
through a dangerous mission 
into safety as the commander 
of the vessel. 

In a war game simulation, the 
submarine commander is in 
charge of carrying out a missio 
seeking out enemy ships and 
destroying them. Frenzied 
attacks on merchant convoys 
have to be carried out too, but 
even these are not easy targets 
as they are often surrounded by 
an armed escort of naval vessels. 

In the submarine itself are all 
the vital dials and pressure 
gauges found in a World War II 
submarine. There's a radar to 
track down the enemy's position 
so you can prepare your attack 
and a periscope to survey the 
scene above the waves after an 
attack. 

Sub Commander runs on both 
32K and 16K Pets and is available 
now from Barnsley based soft- 
ware firm Algray Software for 
£13.95. 

FLIGHT INTO 
DANGER 

Pilot a plane through the night 
sky armed with laser beams and 
a hold full of bombs. 

The object of Pegasus II is to 
defend your aircraft from an 
enemy force attacking you with 
four types of alien creatures and 
craft. At the same time you have 
to navigate your way along a 
hazardous route which contains 
objects and dangerous missile 
bases to blast at your vessel. 

You set the landscape by 
heightening mountains to fly 
over. There is a refuelling man- 
oeuvre when your gas runs low, 
taking the plane through metal 
sensory satellites until you reach 
the redocking stage. ' 

Pegasus II runs on the Apple 
with 48K of memory. It was writ- 
ten in the U.S. and has recently 
been brought over to this coun- 
try by S.B.D. Software and costs 
£17.95. 




WANTED: A UNIVERSE SAVIOUR 

Wlflil'i'l'/iWi- ~ 



Space Invaders on the ZX8I can 
)e just as challenging as on other 
nachines with more sophisti- 
cated graphics. 

This recent addition to the 
Essential Software Company's 
ZX81 games range emulates the 
classic Space Invaders format 
and runs in 8K. 

The player's task is to defend 
his own ship from scores of 
rapidly descending galactic crea- 



BREAK THE COLOUR CODE 



Pit your wits against the compu- 
ter in a test of mental agility to 
crack the computer-set code. 

The old favourite Mastermind 
has got another run for its 
money, this time on Commo- 
dore's latest machine, the VIC-20. 
You either have the knack of 
playing this logical guessing 
game or not but if you do. you'll 
find it converts well to the VIC. 

You select between five and 
nine guesses at breaking the 
colour coded problem set by the 
computer. The code is made up 
of four variables and there are 
two columns on the right-hand 
side of the screen giving the 
clues to the accuracy of each 
guess. 



The letter "B" represents a 
black peg and tells you that you 
have got a guess with the right 
colour in the right place. "W" 
represents a white peg and 
means that you have got a guess 
in the right column but the 
wrong position. 

Points are scored at the end of 
the game depending on how 
many guesses it took. 

There is a reverse of this game 
out too, called Codemaker. In 
that one you set the code for the 
computer to break. And in some 
cases, man is better than 
machine. Both games are from 
Adda Computers VIC Centre in 
North Acton and cost £14.95 
each. 




lures whose sole aim in life is to 
destroy you and take control of 
the Universe. 

The shoot button is the 0 or 1 
key on the board and the direc- 
tional control keys are the num- 
bers 5 and 8. Altogether you get 
five laser base lives, so each time 
one of your lasers is destroyed it 
reduces your total power 

If your laser base is wiped out 
quickly, the picture on the screen 
freezes for a second and then the 
game flicks back to the beginning 
for an automatic restart. 

If you lack a space invader 
game in your ZX81 games library, 
now's the chance to rectify it. 
Copies are available from The 
Essential Software Company for 
£6.00 each. 



VICTORY 



As electronic chess grows in 
popularity new games are being 
brought out at lower prices to 
give more enthusiasts a chance 
to tackle computerised oppo- 
nents. 

An addition to the Challenger 
range of games is Mini Sensory 
Chess Challenger. It's only 21 x 
11.5 ■ 5 cm in size, so it can 
easily find a resting place in the 
home or office. 

The sensory surface of the 
board means a keyboard is not 
needed. When the pieces are 
pushed onto the board the 
game's memory takes over, h 
recognises each chess piece 
when it's moved and stores 
away information of where each 
piece is placed. 

The capabilities of the mini 
game are soon to be expanded 
with the introduction of plug-in 
modules. Scheduled for release 
are an advanced chess program, 
popular book openings and fam- 
ous chess games which players 
can try out for themselves. 

The game is fairly hardy com- 
ing in a tough plastic casing and 
costs £54.95 from Computer 
Games distributors. II either 
runs off batteries (not supplied) 
or can be run olf a mains trans- 
former. 



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26 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



LOOKING at computer errors 
reinforces a sense of human 
superiority. In the chess field it 
is also of value to those develop- 
ing their own programs. 

It is certainly not unknown for 
a program to lose by attempting 
to make an illegal move, such as 
a Pawn's initial "double" move 
when the intervening square is 
not empty! 

A particularly bad case of an 
illegal move occurred in the first 
European Computer Chess 
Championship which was 
played in Amsterdam in August 
1976. In the second round, 
Orwell reached position (A) 
against Tell. 

Orwell (White), to move, next 
advanced the Queen's Bishop 
Pawn to the eighth r ank and 
obviously has a trivial win. 
Unfortunately Orwell neglected 
to make any pronouncement 
about the promotion, i.e. 
whether the Pawn should be 
changed to a Queen or some 
other piece. Strictly, the arbiter 
David Levy (an international 
chess master) should now have 
forfeited White on the grounds 
that it could not play a legal 
game. Orwell went on to win. 

The sequel does, in fact, sup- 
port Levy's ruling. It is clear that 
Orwell did not regard the offend- 
ing Pawns as promoted to 
Queens and, perhaps more sur- 
prisingly. Tell obviously did not 
either! 

Since 1970, the Association for 
Computing Machinery (ACM) 
has sponsored an annual United 
States (later North American) 
championship. In the first of the 
series, played in New York in 
1970. the following game was 
played between Tony Mars- 
land's program (White) and J. Biit 
(a program written by U.S. mas- 
ter Hans Berliner — the name 
stood for Just Because It Is 
There). 

1. P-QB4, N-KB3; 2. P-Q4, P-K3; 3. 
Q-Q3? (developing the Queen 
much too early), N-B3; 4. N-KB3; 
P-Q4; 5. N-K5? (unnecessarily 
moving the same piece twice at 



By Max Bramer 



in last month's article I gave exam- 
ples of two appalling blunders made 
by the program named Albatross in 
last year's first world microcomputer 
championship. This month I am 
returning to the topic of errors: major 
and minor, straightforward and sub- 
tle. 

At first glance, it might seem sur- 
prising that a computer — a 
supremely logical device — could 
ever make errors in a non-chance 
game such as chess. However, this 
is far from true. 




■ A ■ Si 

a a 

■ mtm _■_ 



■ ■ 



£ 

1 



1 



(WHITE) (WHITE) 
C (BLACK) D (BLACK) 


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Pawn). PXP; 6. QXP (B4). B-NSch 

(6 QXP wins a Pawn at 

once); 7. B-Q2, BXBch; 8. KXB? 
(the worst move, losing a piece 
for no reason), NXN; 9. Q-B5? 
(again, the worst move, losing 
the Queen), N-K5ch; 10. Resigns! 
After 10.... NXQ all White's 
developed pieces would have 
been captured. The explanation 
of this weird game is probably a 
programming bug which caused 
the program to prefer positions 
where it was as far behind in 
material as possible! 

Position (B) was reached a year 
later at the second U.S. champ- 
ionship in Chicago. C.C.C.P. 
(White) has completely out- 
played David (Black) and has a 
simple win, but it had not been 
taught to avoid repetition. 
l.R-Nlch, K-R4; 2. R-B5ch, K-R3; 
3. R-B6ch. K-R4; 4. R-B5ch, K-R3; 

-R4: 6. R-B5ch and 



Black was able to claim a draw. 

More difficult to avoid is (C) 
Kaissa v. Chaos, first computer 
championship, Stockholm. 1974. 

Here Black should probably 
castle queen-side, with good 
chances. However, the program 
gave high value to positions 
where the King was surrounded 
by its own men "for safety". In 
this case, this objective led Black 
to fatally weaken his position by 

1 K-Q2? a misapplication of 

a perfectly reasonable rule after 
which Black may well be lost. 

The last example (D) is a 
famous one. which could onjy 
have been played by computer. 
For seven moves. White has a 
mate in one, but is in no hurry to 
play it. A mate in two is almost as 
good, and so the checkmating 
move is continually postponed. 
Black meanwhile manages to 
advance a Pawn, promote it and 
eventually even wins the game. 
Played at the second U.S. 
championship: Coko III (White) v 
Genie (Black). 

White can, of course, check- 
mate by Q-N2 and the same 
comment applies for the next six 
moves. However, the game con- 
tinued: 

1.K-B1, P-KB4; 2. K-B2, P-B5; 3. 
K-Bl, P-N5; 4. K-B2. P-B6; 5. K-Bl, 
PXP; 6. K-B2. PXR=Q; 

Inexplicably, White now 
makes a more serious blunder. 
The remainder of the game is 
horrible. 

7. K-Bl?? QXBch; 8. K-Q2, QXPch; 
9. K-Bl, Q-N8ch; 10. K-B2, 
QXP(R7)ch; 11. K-Bl, Q-R8ch; 12. 
K-B2, Q-QN8ch; 13. K-Q2, P-N6; 
14. Q-B4ch, Q-N6; 15. QXQch, 
KXQ; 

White is now lost, but should 
at least play K-K2 to stop Black's 
Pawn. 

16. P-K4? ( KXP; 17. P-K5, P-N7; 18. 
Resigns. 

Is it better to "maintain" a 
threat or to execute it immedi- 
ately? There is no simple ans- 
wer; it depends entirely on the 
position. 

I shall return to this problem 
next month when I consider the 
so-called "horizon effect" 



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28 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



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THE bid to produce a microcom- 
puter able to play a respectable 
game of bridge has proved an 
uphill task. The fact that a game 
of bridge is split into two parts, 
bidding and playing a hand, 
poses the programmer very dif- 
ferent problems horn the game of 
chess. 

The first commercial attempt 
available in this country was 
Fidelity Electronics' Bridge Chal- 
lenger, marketed over here by 
Computer Games. 

Playing a simple bidding sys- 
tem, the Mark I machine (origi- 
nally selling at just under £300 
before being superseded by 
Mark II) was a very good first 
attempt at the problem. Consid- 
ering the man-years (man- 
centuries?) that had been put 
into chess-playing machines, a 
lot had been achieved for bridge 
in a very short time. 

The Bridge Challenger had a 
lot of interesting features. It 
could play one, two. three or four 
of the hands (with humans mak- 
ing up the numbers) and was 
completely ethical — in other 
words if it happened to know 
both the East and West cards on 
a particular deal it would only 
attempt to solve the problems 
that it was set (in both bidding 



BY ALAN HIRON 

and play) with the information 
that it knew legitimately. 

There were a number of 
optional features that could be 
included in the bidding system 
used (weak or strong no-trump, 
five-card majors and so on) that 
made the system usable on both 
sides of the Atlantic where bid- 
ding methods vary considerably. 
Hands could be dealt with a spe- 
cial pack of magnetized cards 
and read into the machine with- 
out the human players seeing 
their faces, hands could be 
replayed and so on. 

This was all very satisfactory 
but by no stretch of the imagina- 
tion did the quality of the bid- 
ding and play live up to good 
human standard. Although there 
were one or two enlightened 
reviews, the majority of bridge 
correspondents tended to sneer 
at the machine's sheer lack of 
bridge ability. 

As an exercise, the computer 
was set to work to compete in 
"Bidding Challenge", a monthly 
competition run by Bridge 
Magazine between the current 
holders and the new challen- 
gers. It achieved (somewhat luc- 
kily) a score oi 47 out of a poss- 



ible 100 with its human oppo- 
nents collecting an average 
expert score of about 80. 

There were noticeable weak- 
nesses in the play as well as the 
bidding and players muttered 
about the time taken to input a 
hand, either by reading the 
cards or by using the keyboard. 
To a large extent these difficul- 
ties have been overcome by 
Mark II. The bidding and play 
have improved and there are a 
large number of pre-dealt hands 
that can be generated with only 
a few key depressions — obvi- 
ously a good idea. 

In my next article I will give 
one or two examples of how 
Bridge Challenger copes in prac- 
tice. Furthermore, it has a new 
rival on the market 
Bridgemaster. A short challenge 
match between the two 
machines should prove reveal- 
ing , . . 

A new idea, shortly to be 
released, is for a visual form of 
the old Auto-Bridge. This is not a 
playing machine, but simply a 
tape or two for a particularly 
well-known home computer that 
tests your expertise in both bid- 
ding and play. And the graphics 
really are rather fun — in glori- 
ous technicolour. 



FOR SO LONG, A BRIDGE TOO FAR 



The social side of Bridge has encour- 
aged a vast following but not the 
computerisation which chess players 
have craved. 

In Britain, far more people play 
bridge, even if only occasionally, than 
play football or cricket and it Is even 
more popular in the U.S. 

I first played around with a compu- 
ter to play bridge in 1959, but it was a 
massive water-cooled Mercury and 
results were long and slow in coming. 

In the 60s the problems of getting a 
machine to play a full game seemed 
intractable but computers were 
developed as a short cut to cope with 
the scoring problems involved in big 
simultaneous pairs events, played at 
perhaps 200 centres and where all 
players tackled the same 24 hands. 

It involved some complications in 



those early days which I will repeat to 
show how lucky we are to have mic- 
rocomputers around loday. 

I played in the very first on-line 
scored tournament in Ostend in 1964. 
An IBM machine, special score cards 
and magnetic pencils were used. 

Each scorer marked the card in a 
special way and the cards subse- 
quently read directly by a card reader. 
Theory? Excellent! In practice? Disas- 
ter? Bridge players, who traditionally 
never listen to any instructions that 
they are given, managed to strike out 
the wrong digits on about one card in 
two. The eventual manual checking 
and repair work needed to get every- 
thing right took about four times as 
long as il the event had been scored 
manually Irom the word go. 

The next idea came from Australia. 



To prevent people losing their nice 
magnetic recording pencils and using 
any stray pen that came to hand, the 
score-cards were conventional punch 
cards but with ready made perfora- 
tions around any digit that might need 
to be punched. The idea was that any 
implement could be used to poke out 
the hole on the card and so register a 
score that could be read directly. 

A big improvement, yes. but play- 
ers still tended to continue their 
post-mortems of their most recenl 
disaster and pay insufficient attention 
to the task in hand. Extra holes were 
absent-mindedly included — II is 
great fun pushing out a perforated 
hole with a pen — and the computer 
found it remarkably difficult to score a 
contract ol 23 hearts, making 18 tricks 
— hardly surprising. 



1 



—I 




There's a spark of genius behind 
the new arcade game which is 
taking America by storm. 

Titled Qix {and pronounced 
kicks), the most remarkable thing 
about this new game is thai it is 
not tied to any theme It is a 
strategic game, pure and simple, 
with no compromising to make 
the player think he's saving the 
Earth or competing in a Grand 
Prix. 

The only thing you are battling 
in Qix is electricity. It is a game of 
line drawing, snatching space 
across the machine while avoid- 
ing the many hazards. 

To begin with, the screen con- 
sists only of four borders down 
which travel two "Sparx". The 

CHOPPERS 
AND TANKS 
FOR TWO 

The odds are really stacked 
against the defender in Armour 
Attack. 

Panzers are prowling the 
streets, helicopters hover 
dangerously overhead and your 
ieep is the only thing that stands 
between the town and the occu- 
pation force. 

Tanks are an increasingly 
common Inhabitant of our arcade 
machines While Armour Attack 
does not compare visually with 
the excitement of Battle Zone, it 
does offer plenty of scope for 
round-the-houses manoeuvring 
and encourages guerilla hit-and- 
run tactics from the defender 

The jeep can make quite a 
dent in the hardware which is 
trundling through the streets. 

The game lends itself to the 
two-player mode with a second 
jeep appearing and allowing the 
players to join forces to defend 
Ihe town. Individual and team 
scores are kept in this case 



iRIlii III ill 1 Ob 




A SPARK OF GENIUS 



player is in charge of a marker at 
the bottom of the screen and to 
escape the Sparx he must draw a 
line upwards into the screen. 

The problem is that while 
drawing, the marker is vulnerable 
to the Qix a large brightly col- 
oured, randomly travelling spark. 
If you hesitate In mid-line, you 
run into the third villain of the 
piece — the Fuse. A box which is 
loo long being completed will 
mean the Fuse is lit at the place 
where the marker left the estab- 
lished lines and rushes up to 
destroy the hesitating marker. 

Those are the hazards, now for 



the aims. In Qix you have to fill in 
as much of the screen as you can 
before one of the hazards does 
for you. 75% of the screen filled, 
results in a new screen to tackle. 

You can either draw in fast 
mode or risk the slow mode for 
double points. 

Gradually small boxes fill the 
screen with tiny lines to dodge 
the sparx on and next step is a 
desperate dash to the side to 
complete a space capturing box. 

Just as the player feels he is 
getting on top of the Sparx, they 
multiply and become more 
dangerous and aggressive. 




Tanks must be hit twice to be 
completely destroyed. The first 
hit from the ieep merely 
immobilising the enemy and 
scores 20 points for the player. A 
second hit destroys the turret 
and is worth an additional 30 
points. 

For each helicopter destroyed 
the player gets a bonus of 10 
points on every tank he finishes 
off. And after five helicopters are 
shot down the player receives an 
extra ieep. 



As the game progresses trie 
tanks and helicopters get faster 
and become more difficult to pick 
off. 

A good tactical game but 
ignore the manufacturer's claims 
of "unprecedented realism". 



There is one final danger of a 
careless player's own making 
This is known as the spiral death 
trap and is caused by a player 
cutting in on himself too soon — 
at the first hint of a wrong turn- 
ing, the Fuse is lit and ready to 
chase the offender down 

Each player will develop his 
own ideas on strategy and this 
will be mirrored in the type of 
space-filling designs he pro- 
duces. This is a basic outline of 
the game — we will do more on 
tactics in a future issue 

U.S. successes are not guaran- 
teed to do well with British play- 
ers — but there is a strong lobby 
predicting that Qix will catch on 
like lightning over here. 

SHUTTLING 
OFF THIS 
MORTAL COIL 

A small step for man turns into a 
lourney not to be contemplated 
in Moon Shuttle 

If conquest of space was this 
tough, America's shuttle would 
be put back under wraps 
immediately. The main trouble in 
this game is that the Prince of 
Darkness has set up his forces 
between you and the moon with 
the sworn aim of preventing any- 
one reaching there. He is helped 
in this by a meteorite storm 
which travels across the screen 
and has to be crossed by your 
craft. 

Blasting a pathway though the 
meteorites is only the start of 
your problems, though, as the 
Pnnce of Darkness' troops, con 
sisting of such horrors as. Blob 
Men. Men-O-War and Bomb 
Launchers, do their best to keep 
the moon uninhabited. 

Good colourful graphics but 
the Apollo mission never had it 
this tough. 



30 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



TIPS 





YOU CAN'T 
KEEP A GOOD 
FROG DOWN 

A frog is back in the arcade news 
in one of the strangest game 
concepts currently going the 
rounds. 

Frog and Spiders puts the 
player in the amphibious title role 
in a real tangled web of wildlife 
drama. 

The frog develops from a tad- 
pole quickly to take up position 
at the bottom of the screen while 
spiders weave a massive web 
above him. Using the fire button 
the frog must shoot down the 
spiders, once to knock them 
down, twice to kill them The 
spiders fire back, naturally, but a 
bigger danger is the snake who 
slithers out along the bottom of 
the screen and will bite the frog 
unless the creature can |ump 
over him. 

But don't hop into a bee on 
your way up as this also spells 
disaster. On these jumps you can 
earn bonus points for eating a 
spider More points can be 
gamed on these aerial excur- 
sions, by dislodging dragonflies 
and butterflies caught in the 
spider's web. 

But there is a 100 point pen- 
alty if you hit a butterfly or 
dragonfly by mistake. 

A pesky squirrel adds to the 
action by appearing on a bough 
above the web and sending 
down an acorn bomb to further 
confuse proceedings. 

A control lever, fire button and 
jump action are the only controls 
you have to master but working 
out the game itself is a real test. 

It's a revelation to discover 
gust what is going on in your local 
lilypond 




BUTTONS GALORE 



Many an arcade player has writ- 
ten off Defender as requiring one 
more hand than the usual human 
complement. 

Its awesome array of buttons 
and deadly collection of six alien 
craft seem to defy mastery. And 




DEFENCE IS THE KEY 



Newcomers to Defender do not 
realise how apt the title is, for 
unless you protect the 
humanoids who inhabit the 
planet's surface, your own 
demise follows swiftly. 

When the last of the 10 
humanoids you must protect, is 
taken to the t^p of the screen by 
a Lander craft, the screen gives 
a definite shudder and the entire 
alien attack wave descends on 
you at once — even the best 
Defender players soon lose lives 
in this situation. 

Each batch of humanoids must 
be protected for four attack 
waves before another 10 are 
placed in your care and they are 
worth much more to the player 
than mere bonuses. 

The six alien craft that inhabit 
the Defender machine are. in 
reality, only four. The fast and 
deadly Mutants are Landers that 
have fulfilled their mission of 
taking a kidnapped humanoid to 
the top of the screen. 

The Swarmers are the 
remnants of an exploded Pod. 
Bombers, which with Landers, 
make up the bulk of any screen's 
attack force, seed space with 
small bombs which can be 
unwittingly flown into. 

And finally Briters, the seem- 
ingly unshakable green U.F.O.s, 
whose main purpose is to keep 
the player on the move. Any 
dallying and one of these horrors 



will be despatched to prompt the 
player to speed up. 

In Defender some of the 
action takes place off screen on 
the radar area. Many players 
mis-use this feature as a way of 
lining up their next alien victim, 
it should be used to keep a 
check on any Lander trying to 
smuggle a man off the surface. 

Three smart bombs are given 
to the player at the start of the 
game and one more, plus one 
more life, is added with every 
10,000 points scored. 

These should be saved, if 
possible, until the beginning of 
the third wave, then the high 
scoring Pods are waiting in 
force and all can be destroyed 
complete with their Swarming 
cargo by one bomb. Note: if only 
one Pod is on the screen when 
the bomb is detonated its Swar- 
mers will be released. 

Hyperspace is seldom used as 
it is very hard to find in a panic. 
But if you do use it and find 
yourself materialising in a situa- 
tion just as deadly as the one 
you just escaped from, it is poss- 
ible to press the button again 
before you have fully material- 
ised 

Humanoids being lifted off the 
planet's surface should be the 
prime consideration. If the kid- 
napping Lander is shot before he 
gets too high, the man falls 
safely back to earth. 



yet those who have persevered 
with Defender are the most 
devoted of players, swearing by 
the game as the most complete 
and satisfying tactically 

All this may sound like heresy 
to those of us who spent a small 
fortune on the game and came 
away short-changed on time and 
none the wiser on its winning 
ways. 

The fact is Defender does not 
tolerate learners easily While 
space invaders could be played 
and enjoyed without an under- 
standing of the tactics, Defender 
comes across as a blurr of action, 
culminating in unavoidable death 
at the hands of a whole collec- 
tion of seemingly better 
equipped alien craft 

Followers of the game have 
already given this column a taste 
of their fervour with many 
requests to feature the game in 
the "Tips" section 

The most interesting "bug" 
we have been told about on the 
machine, comes courtesy of M. 
He j ley who claims 

When you shoot a Lander and 
rescue the humanoid under your 
ship, it is not always necessary 
to put him down You can con- 
tinue saving and storing the men 
under the ship until you have six 
or seven under there This will 
produce some interesting effects 
when all six are put on the 
ground like some men 
appearing at the top of the 
screen, making Bnters (the fast 
green U.F.O.s) disappear and hav- 
ing the effect of "hyperspace" on 
your craft and other things on 
the screen. 

STREET TALK 

Perhaps it is a sign of the 
concentration needed to play 
Defender that very few sayings 
connected with the game were 
brought to our attention. 

The only two we overheard 
were: 

• One to hang onto — referring 
to the all-important last 
humanoid who can be collected 
under the craft to prevent his 
being grabbed by the Landers. 

• Mountain hugging — the tac- 
tic of flying low just above the 
horizon to blast Landers before 
they take captives too high. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 3: 



SPEED RACE RUNS ON A TEXAS 



INSTRUMENTS 99/4 




WRITTEN IN T.I. EXTENDED 



BASK by Stephen Shaw 




MI 

Glg?/fo seeJ^our. fhag. Although 
yoijl&rfry program^lor almost-every 
lype of competition, you missed the 
T* 99'4 now selling taster than T.l. 
can import it. Sales will shoot up 
when the modified 99 4a get in — so 
watch lor it. . 

To rectify your omission I enclose 
a sample program written in T.I. 
extended Basic. This makes use ol 
Sprites, smoothly moving charac- 
ters, to ululate the Sega game 
Monaco G.P. 



PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION 



Up to line 120 sets direction of other 
cars. 

Lines 130-140 define special charac- 
ters: 

CHAR 100 is the cars, 110 is the 
road edge. 105 the crash barriers. 
CALL SPRITE initiates the sprites, 
with sprite number character code, 
colour, initial positions and initial 
velocities. 

Sprites 6 upwards are the crash bai- 

. tiers. *JT 

Line 333 sets the colour of the road, 
drawn in line 332. 
Line 325 sets the colour of the road, 
edge, drawn in line 334, also defined 
in line 334. 



es 340-360 irfffiate the four oppo- 
nent cars/ 37fl?Initiates your cat. 
Your car -is s/ationary. as are the 
others, at tin* stage. 
The core of the*>rogram is 390-520. 
CALLCOINC. cfotted around, discov- 
ers if two sprites are overlapping at 
that exact instant. If they are, you go 
to the crash routine from line 900. 
470 increments the timer & distance. 
490 causes the opponents' cars to 
weave from side to side at specifi- 
cally timed Intervals. 500 make*> 
them move. 

440 moves your car left 8r right if 
arrow keys are pressed - - movement 
continues until 420 is reached again: 
internal timing is such as to natui 
ally stop car just on road on left and 
on hard shoulder on right. 
To cheat, crash your way to the right 
hand side of the screen and stay 
there! 

910 stops all motion while crash cal- 
culations take place. 
930 invokes penalty. 
932 333 will bring game to end attei 
15 crashes of 200 time units — but 
note this section is only leached 
after a crash! 

935 and 936 restore original condi 
tions re:- opponent car movement. 

940-960 put opponents back in place 
VARIABLES 

V- The ASCII Code ol key pressed.* 

CT AND X- Counters 

Speed-Relative speed ■ # « 

T« Elapsed time 

S- Distance 

Crash- Crash counter 

M- Direction 



i2 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



10 CALL CLEAR 

20 PRINT "SPEEDRACE" ' "COPYRIGHT 
XSei " : "BY STEPHEN SHAW" : " 10? ALST 
ONE ROAD? STOCKPORT": "CHESHIRE 
SK4 5 AH" ! : : 

30 PRINT "USE S & D TO NOME ":"L 
EFT & RIGHT": ' ": "USE KEYS 1? 

2?3?&4 TO"! "SELECT GEAR" 
40 PRINT "TIME fc DISTANCE ARE ": 
"DISPLAYED. " = "DISTANCE SUFFERS I 
F YOU" : "CRASH" 

50 PRINT " PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUE " 

60 CALL KEY»:0?V?M) 

70 IF M :1 THEN 60 

80 CALL SCREEN (2) 

90 FOR X=l TO 100 : : NEXT X 

inn roi_L CLEAR 

t 10 CALL MAGNIFY (3) 

130 CALL CHAR ( 100- "96FEBA3633BAF 

135 CALL CHAR U 10- "5A5A5A5A5A5A5 

1 40 " C ALL CHAP ( 1 05 • " FFOOOOOOOOOOO 

150 CALL SCREEN i.4) 

160 CALL SPRITE C*6* 1 10* 13* SO* 1 * 9 
0 • 0 ) 

1 70 _ CALL SPR ITE»"87* 1 05 ? 13? 75 ? 17* 

1 80 "CALL SPR ITE ( *8 * 10$* i 3 .70* 30 ? 

150 CALL SPRITE (89? 110? 13*65* 1*9 

200 CALL SPRITE ( 810? 105* 13* 60? 17 
, 90*0) 

21 0 CALL SPR ITE (81 1 ? 105* 1 3 * 55 ? 30 

220 ** CALL SPR I TE ( 8 1 2 ? 1 05 * 1 3 * 50 * 1 * 

230 U CALL SPRITE (8 13, 105? 13* 45? 17 

240 ? CALL SPR ITE (814* 105? 1 3 * 40 i 30 

250 'CALL SPRITE (815? 105? 13*65* 14 
5 i 90* 0) 

260 CALL SPRITEC816? 105* 13?60? 15 
7. QO, 0) 

270 _ CALL SPRITE (817? 1 1 0* 1 3* 75 ? 17 

230 ~ CALL SPRITE (816? 1 05 • 1 3 ? 70 - 1 4 

290 CALL SPR ITE (819? 105s 1 3 ? 65 ? 1 5 
7*90*0) . 4 _ t _ 

300 CALL SPRITE (8Z0? 1»J5? l:.-i* bU- 17 

3 • 90 ? 0 ) 

310 CALL SPRITE <821 ? 105? 13? 55* 14 
5- 30* 0) 

320 , CALL SPR ITE (822? 1 05 ? 1 3 ? 50 * 1 5 

325 J CALL COLOR ( S? 3*4) 

330 CALL SPR I TE 1 823 ,110? 13*45? 17 

3 j CjO * 0 ) 

332" TALL MCHAR(1?S? 140? 216) 

333 CALL COLOR (14? 12* 12) 

3'3<C CALL MCHAR ( 1 ? 7? 95? 24) : 5 CALJI 

UCHAR ( 1 * 17*95? 24)"-: CALL. CH^R (9 



340 FOR CT=1 TO 4 

350 CALL SPRITE. 8CT? 100- CT+6-CT* 
47-4?> * 33— CT^Q ? 0 • 0) 
360 NEXT CT 

370 CALL SPR ITE '.85? 1 00 * 1 6 ? 1 60 - 74 

? 0 * 0 » 

360 REM **!**• 
390 REM w*+M 

400 CALL SOUND (-1000* -2? 30-7«SPE 
ED I 

410 CALL CO INC ( ALL ?D) • ■ IF 0 <0 T 
HEN GOSUE 900 

420 CALL KEY(0*A*B):: IF A=ASC ( " 
S" J THEN CALL MOTION (85* 0? -10 • 
430 IF A= ASC ( " ) THEN CALL MOT ID 
N i 85? 0? 10) 

440 IF A<30 THEN CALL MOTION '85? 

0 , 0 ) 

450 CALL CO INC (ALL? D5 * S IF D<0 T 
HEN GOSUE 900 

460 IF A>46 AND A <53 THEN SFEED= 
(A-4Si--"3 

461 CALL CO INC (ALL* D) : : IF 0,0 T 
HEN GOTO 521 

470 T=T+1 : : SssS+6HSPEED : : D1SP 
LAY AT ( 1 0 * 1 8 ) S I ZE ( 1 0 ) ! ST RI ( S 1 S 

"t,STR3:(T:i 
460 CALL COINC(ALL?D:i : : IF D 0 T 
HEN GOTO 521 

490 IF TX5=INT (T---5) THEN M=~M 

500 CALL MOT I ON i 8 1 * SPEED-40 * M^5? 
82* SPEED*40* M*5, 83»SPEED*4G* M*5> 
84?SPEED**:40?MM5) 

501 CALL COINS (ALL? D) : : IF DO T 
HEN GOSUE 900 

520 GOTO 400 

521 G0SU5 900 

522 GOTO 400 

900 CALL SOUND » -900 ? -6 ? 0 ) 

9 1 0 CALL MOT I ON I 8 1 ? 0 * 0 * 82 - 0 * C ■ 83 

, 0 , 0 - 84 * 0 * 0 - 85 * Oa »"i ) 

920 " SPEED= 1- '3 



IF 



EM £=0 



9I-; 2 CP AS H= C R A S HtI 

933 IF CRASH=15 DP T> 200 

TO 2000 

935 H=+l 

936 T=T-.:5^»T/'5-INT (T< 5) 



UK 



CT=1 TO 4 



GO 



950 CALL SPR I TE < SCT - 1 00 * 
47-45-9 3 * C T * 6 ? 0 ? 0 3 
960 NEXT CT 
Cir.F. :":PEED=0 
970 RETURN 
2000 CALL CLEAR 

2010 PRINT "YOU HAVE TRAVELLED A 

"I "A DISTANCE OF "?S 
2020 PRINT "AND HAD "? CRASH'*' I R 
ASHES! " 



zOou I 



HEN PRINT 



YUM HI 




NOT A BAD DRIVER" 
2040 IF S<100 THEN PRINT " YOU SH 
OULD NOT 6E ON THE" S" ROAD" 
2050 PRINT "TO TRY AGAIN* ENTER ' 

RUN* " 
2060 END 
207 



j END 



i 





BY STAN OCKERS 

ON AN ATARI IN 





S „o» «h. h<.d « would 
nnt have invented tms P u 

S "weU suited to the com- 
P The object a. the ^ 

wfll be complemented depend 
in9 °\TchtTe '°- ^ in 

Irrsrirr??' 
?; f\.r:."d,°d= b *i°.' 

of numbeis at once Notice no 

n^bts' are entered into strings 
as control graphics. • 

34 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




upper case letter- and the com- 

^ A E D FH'I BDEFH 

^Ss^^Kntain graphics 

in L Tei. PRINT statement as 

,Ol ^e S 410: QRWRWRE 
YZ 420: ARSRSRD 
£ 430: ARSRSRD 
, " e 440: ZRXRXRC 

" „ 1000 and 1010. there 
hnuld be two control commas 

PRINT statement. I he ^ 

nm 

f i nnn and the second one m 
1010. 

PROGRAM EXPLANATION 

Lines 10-40: The keyboard .» 

ssss =3=s 

G u„«so«.mi.-Th.h~™ 

with the initial heart conhgura- 

,i0 Line 190-270: Main loop oi 
fiels player selection, 

safes 

checks for winning . « 
SSSffifd-A -xt area. 



Lines 300-310: Advises ol a los- 
•TSSSbi Acknowledges a 
win. smal. -^"^S 

cS. " the text area (row and 
column). The POKE into 76 clears 

"•rST ThflETCOL^ Sto 
Ss the light hearts e.pe- 

ifea«H 

TORE into 752 blanks the cureor 
Unes 50O-S50 Subroutine to 

PU n t h r e ols tS rhe^^tt u^on 
P S OS described under van- 

^Unes 600-620: Subroutine 

^eTToO-^: 6 Delay" sub- 

°ou,ines. Delay determined by 
•T' ? 7 % r 0% e 7 n 0 ,e Keyboard input 

-trd a r:u% u v 

number N. Hearts may be 
nrne'lOOO-lllO: Instructs 





POKE 744,2351? .MPrtM any Wl 
760 IF PEEK<764>.255 THEN 760 

BOO W«mJ-5«IN-lHF0R M TO 5.N-ASCI 

G»<J*I)HlF WO THEN 850 

610 BOSUB 900i IF F-I THEN 1 »6| 1 

920 IF F»2 THEN ? la|Mft(MM 

630 GET H.Z.IF M AND Z-I60 THEN POS 

ITION I.Vi? ia|MpWlM> B W 

640 IF F«3 AND 2-128 THEN POSITION X,Y 

,? W|M|iM«l,ll)-W 
850 NEXT IiN-SNiRETURN 



-—TO* 



3S 



41 



10 DIN P«(t8),B«<43),B»M>,D»M),H»(9>_ 
,F»(9),L«l9),S«(9> 1 M»l9JtOPEK »1.«,0, 

20 M.CMW(l*0liM»CH«»ua)iF« M J 

f£! na ' 9 " m*7 

89' 

40 SI 1 ' 

■ 

50 GRAPHICS 21P0S1T10N 2,5i? I6| 'CHANG 
IKS HEARTS' i FOR 1-3 TO 6.SETC0L0R 0,1, 
4iS0UND 0,RNDtO>l40*10,lO,B 
55 60SUB 710.P0KE 756 f 226.S0UND M*< 
OJMOMO.IO.B.BOSUB 710iP0KE 756.224.N 
EXT I.SOUND 0,0,0,0 
60 POKE 752,11? I? ,'Ht.d to*"*""* 
( i ( t or N 1MGET II.KilF K-B 

9 THEN GOSUB 1000 

170 T=0 M 
ISO H«*SliG0SUB 400.F-2.60SUB 500 

190 T=T*1 

200 ? CHRIU25>|Murn I '|Ti? 'Pic* i 

WKM^.N-MSiIF N-23 THEN 180 
215 IF N<1 OR N>9 THEN 210 
220 GOSUB 900.GET 16, Hi IF H-160 THEN 
CHR»(125)i? i? "*ou wy only P ick 
ht htarti.'iGOSUB 760i60T0 210 
250 GOSUB 600i IF Hl-U THEN 300 
260 IF HI-FI THEN 350 
270 BOTO 190 

300 FOR S-30 TO 190.S0UND 0,S,10,8iHEI 
TS.SOUHD 0,0,0,Oi?CHRlU25>P 'Sorry 
'tMT.'.M l« out '-.GOSUB 750 



310 GOTO 370 

350 ? CHRIU25>.F0R 0-0 TO 14.P0KE 708 
,4*16IJ.S0UND 0,50-2tJ,lO,8i60SUB 730i 
POKE 70B,40iB0SUB 730 

351 NEXT JlSOUND 0,0,0,0 

360 POKE 656,1»P0KE 657,10i? "CONGRATU 
LATIONS l!!'l? m Vog did it in , |Tf' tu 
rni.'iSOSUB 750 

370 POKE 764,255i? CHRI1125H? i? 'Cir 
• to try again? (¥ or NT.GET I1.K.1F 
K«B9 THEN 170 

380 ' 'Thanht for tht gatt.'.END 
400 GRAPHICS 2.SETC010R 4,2,8iSETC0L0R 
3,4,10iMKE 7W,226iPOKE 752,1 
410 POSITION 7,2i? laf 
420 POSITION 7,4i? Ilf" 
430 POSITION 7,6l? U| B 
440 POSITION 7,8l? loi' 
450 FOR W TO 13 STEP 2iFOR V3 TO 7 
STEP 2.P0SITI0N I.Vi? •6|CHRIM24)|.NE 
IT YiNEXT X I RETURN 

500 FOR N-l TO 9iG0SUB 900iIF F-l THEN 
? I6iH«(N,N)| 

510 IF F«2 THEN ? lfr»St(N ( N>| 
520 IF F-3 THEN ? la|FUM>l 
530 IF F-4 THEN ? I6|N»(N,N1| 
540 IF F»5 THEN ? I6|LHN,N)| 
350 NEXT Ni RETURN 

600 FOR L-l TO 5lF-liGOBUB BOO I SOUND 0 
,5tN*50,lO,BiF-2i806UB 8OO1BOUND 0,5tN 

Wu'ttXT L.SOUND 0,0,0,0iF-3lG0SUB BOO 
1 RETURN 

700 FOR K-0 TO C.NEXT Ki RETURN 
710 C«130i60TO 700 
720 C-1000i80TO 700 
730 C-30iGOT0 700 



900 X-ASClPI(2lN-D).Y-ASC(M(2tNH.P0 
SIT10N X,y 1 RETURN 

1000 HI-BI.BOSUB 40O.F-2iBOBUB 300.? 
Go ♦rot thit patttrn ...'»' « 4r0 
und I'.GQSUB 750 

1010 F-3.B0SUB 500.? CHRIU25)|'To th 
, pitttrn I '1 wound "»y chooii 
nq light htwti.". GOSUB 750 
1020 GRAPHICS 2iF»4i60SUB 500.P0KE 752 
,li? Mhtit art tht politic* nurttra.' 
,? 'DiHwtnt groups Q* htarts -ill M 
■ 

1030 ? 'rtvwstd dtptnding on your cho 
ict.'.GOSUB 75O.F-2.G0SUB 400.GOSUB 50 

0 

1040 ? "I* you pica tht ctnttr squart, 
tht'i? 'htarts in 1 cross »U1 ot tm 

l«O d 606UB 720IN-5.60SUB 600.60SUB 750 
1? CHRIU251i'M you choost tht tiddlt 
squart on' 

.060 -> 'm tdgt, tht -holt tdat -.11 b 
,■,? 'rtvtrstd.'.GOSUB 720.N-8.608UB 6 

OOiGOSUB 750 

1070 ■> CHRI<i25)|'W you pick 1 corntr 
, a wuwt'i? 'including that corntr ■ 
ill bt"i? Vivtritd' 
1080 GOSUB 720.N-7.80SUB 600.B0BUB 750 
,? CHRIU25>i'H you tad up »tth all d 
ark htwti'.? *you lost n, 'iF-5 
1090 GOSUB 500.60SUB 750.7 CHRH125>|' 
Hit tht T kty to gtt back to tht'i? 

•initial pontic*. ' 
1100 ? 'Undtrstand tht instructions' 1 
POKE 764.255.BET ll.K.IF KOB9 THEN 10 
00 

1110 RETURN 




BY AUSTAIR HUTCHEON 



mm 



RUNS ON A 
SHARP MZ-80K 



Stalk your opponent's tank 
through the minefields and bar- 
riers oi the Sharp MZ-80K bat- 
tlefield. 

In Tank Battle, two tank com- 
manders guide their war 



1 PRINT " P.W.V-V.VAV-S%\V.\W.V----.%V^A^VAV--. " 

3 PRINT "VATflNK BATTLE Adapted for MZ-80K bvWm" 

Hi i st air Hutcheon 
TANK BATTLE" 



5 PR1UT "mmm 
7 PRINT"0S2H 
9 PRINT 
11 PRINT" 
13 PRINT" 
15 PRINT" 
17 PRINT" 
19 PRINT" 
21 PRINT" 
23 PRINT" 
25 PRINT" 



1 



□ a a 



27 PRINT 1 



machines around the screen 
waiting for an opening to fixe or 
to force their opponent over a 
mine. 

Points are scored if you hit the 
opposing tank and if your oppo- 
nent sets oil a mine. The winner 
is the first to 10 points. Barriers 
can be destroyed by two direct 
hits to force your way through to 
surprise a hiding opponent. 

Each player controls his tank 
from a 3x3 section of keys at 
either end of the keyboard. The 
eight outside keys give direction 
and the centre key fires a shot in 
the direction of the last move. 

Tank conflicts have proved a 
successful convert to the compu- 
ter screen — and this game by 
Alistair Hutcheon incorporates 
most of the features of that suc- 
cess. 



person to score ten points. 



29 PR I NT "00" 

31 PR I NT ''^^^v.v■^w-^v.w.v.^WA■-^w.^w-w.^v. 

33 USRC62) 

34 MUSIC'CQDEFGFEDC" 

35 PRINT" Press Return To Continue" 
37 GET T*:1F T*="" THEN 37 
39 PR I NT "E INSTRUCTIONS" 

41 PRINT 

43 PRINT" The object of the *ame is the first 

45 PRINT"Points are won in two ways 

47 PRINT"1.BV SHOOTING OPPONENT'S TANK. " 
49 PRINT"2.IF OPPONENT STEPS OH A MINE" 
51 PRINT 

53 PRINT"If a shell hits a barrier'**' "5 . 
55 PR I NT "it will be half destroyed." 
57 PRINT "The next hit will destroy the barrier 
59 PR I NT: PR I NT "The two tanks are denoted as 0 and 
61 PRINT"Each has 9 controls as shown!" 
63 PRINT:PRINT"Plaver 1 "s controls are: - M : PRINT" 
65 PRINT" QUE" 
67 PRINT" A S D": PRINT 

6^ PRINT" Plaver 2 has a similar 3X3 pad at the top risht of ; 

71 PRINT"the keyboard" : USR<62> 

36 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



completely. " 
• . " 

1 2 3" 





73 

75 

77 

79 

81 

S3 

85 

87 

39 

91 

93 

95 

97 

99 
1@1 
103 
105 
107 
169 
111 
113 
115 
117 
119 
121 
123 
125 
127 
129 
131 
133 
135 
137 
139 
141 



Press Return To Continue" 
J$="" THEN 75 

nOV* 1 square in any direction 
that direction f row the 
key fires a shell in the 
= BARRIER" 
= MINE 



key in 
cent re 



centre key. " 
direction Of 



PRINT" 
GET J$: IF 
PRINT"BTo ftOttt 
PR I NT "t he 
PR I NT "The 
PR I NT: PR I NT" 
PRINT* PRINT" 
USR<62> 

PRINT "BBS Press Return To Start" 

GET Jf:IF J$="" THEN 91 
GOSUB 243: PRINTS" 
FOR X=0 TO 39 

POKE 53243+X, 208: POKE 54048+X,208 
NEXT X 
FOR V=l TO 19 

POKE 53248+40+7,208: POKE 53287+40*7, 208 
NEXT V 
USRC62) 
FOR V=l TO 19 
FOR X=l TO 38 
R=RND(1)*10 • 

IF <R>8.9>*<R<9,65>THEN POKE 53248+40*V+X, 46: USR(62> 
IF R>9.65 THEN POKE 53248+40*V>X, 166: MUSIC "-C0" 
NEXT X:NEXT V 
LU=10: LH=3: RU= I©: RH=36 
M=0 

POKE 53651 , 71 : r1USIC"-#B0" : POKE 53684, 72: MUSH!: "-#60" 
PEM***PND NOW TO GET CONTROL*** 
POKE 54141,SL+32:P0KE 54154, SR+32 
IF (3L=10>+(SR=10> THEN 231 
IF <SL=1O>+(SR=10> THEN 231 
Ht-=" " 

GET P$: IF fl$="" THEN 137 
IF(p$="R"> + (;Pt="" n > THEN R=-l:D=l 
IF <!fi*="S"> + <fi*="l "> THEN R=0:D=1 



■ OU r 




COMPUTER & 



We can 

all help 
if we care 
enough . . . 



Many people regard computers as some form 
of man-made monster, heralding the advent of 
an era where machines are the masters of men. 
The emergence of microcomputers in the 
mid-seventies has helped to overcome this 
misguided view of how computers will affect 
our lives. 

Each month, Educational Computing shows 
the tremendous advances being made in the 
enhancement of computers, particularly 
micros, as teaching aids. In this annual issue, 
Learning to cope — computers in special 
education, we look at the marvellous 
achievements of many very dedicated people 
working with disabled and 



mentally-handicapped children. 

Tremendous progress is being made in this 
area, brought about by a mixture of ingenuity, 
flexibility and determination on behalf of the 
manufacturers of specially-adapted products, 
writers of applications software, nurses and 
teachers putting ideas into practice and the 
children themselves. 

In our annual, we look at the latest 
developments in special education. You can 
read about the many fascinating applications of 
microelectronics in this field, what the people 
involved think and what the future holds in 
store. Most important of all, you can find if 
you can help — even in a small way. 



Learning to cope — computers in special education £1.50 

Please send me a copy of Learning to cope — computers in special education. 
I enclose a cheque/postal order made payable 10 Educational Compuiing for £1.50 (including P&P). 

Name 

Position _ 

Establishment 

Address ■ 

Now please posi lo: Learning 10 cope — computers in special education, 8 Herbal Hill, London BCl 5JB. 

38 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



143 
145 
147 

1 

155 

157 
159 
161 

163 

165 

167 

169 

171 

173 

175 

177 

179 

181 

133 

185 

187 

189 

191 

193 

195 

197 

199 

201 

263 

265 

207 

209 

211 

213 

215 

217 

219 

221 

223 

225 

227 

229 

231 

233 

235 

237 

239 

241 

243 

245 

247 

249 

251 



255 



THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 



R=i:D=l 

R=-l:D=6 

191 

R=l:D=8 
R=-l:D=-l 
R=0:D=-1 
R=l:D=-i 



RR=R: RD=C>: U=RL>: H=RH: P=72: S=Sl_: M=RM 
LR-R: LD=E>: U=LU: H=LH: P=71 : S=SR: M=LM 



IF<fi$= ,, D">+<ftt= ,, ^"> THEN R=l:D=l 
IF<P$="Q">+(fl$= M L"> 
IFCfl$= M W"> + <fl*="J ,l > 
IF<A*="E H > + <A$="* > "> 
IF(H$= M l">+(fi$="h") 
IF<ft$="2") + (fi$=" J -"> 
IF<A$="3"> + <A$= M « ,, > 
IF(R=0>+<D=0>THEN 135 
REM****CONTR0L INPUT**** 

LL=GSC':a$> 

IF LLMO0 THEN 
IF LL<160 THEN 
C=53248+H+48*U 
N=53248+H+R+40*<U+D> 

IF(PEEK<N>>70>*<PEEK<NX>46>THEN 127 
IF<PEEK<N>=0)THEN POKE C> Ms M=0S POKE N,P 
IF PEEK<N>=46 THEN POKE CM 
IF PEEK<N>=46 THEN M=46:POKE N,P:60SUB2- 
H=H+R:U=U+D 
LL=ASC(A:f) 

IF LLM00 THEN RU=U: RH=H: SL=S: RM=M 
IF LL<100 THEN LU=U: LH=H: SR=S: LM=M 
GOTO 127 

REM******TflNK MOVEMENT******** 

IF A$="J" THEN U=RU:H=RH:R=RR:D=RC>:G!=72 

IF ft*= ,, W" THEN U=Ll':H=LH:R=LR:D=LD:Q=71 

MUSIC "-AO" 

C=53248+H+40*U 

N=53243+H+R+40* C U+D > 

IF PEEK<N)=0 THEN POKE CQsPOKE N, 68: H=H+R: U=V+D: G=0: GOTO 197 
IF PEEKCN)=212 THEN POKE C,Q:GOSUB 21?:P0KE N,0:GOTO 127 
IF PEEK\N) = 166 THEN POKE C,Q:GOSUB 217:P0KE N, 212: GOTO 127 
IF PEEK<N>=46 THEN POKE CQsPOKE N, 68: H=H+R: U=U+D: Q=46: GOTO 19? 
PEEK(N>=71 THEN SR=SR+l:POKE C»Q>60SUB 217:GOTO 127 



5:GOSUB217:S=S+l 



IF 

IF PEEK<N)=?2 THEN SL=SL+l:POKE 
IF PEEK<N>>20© THEN POKE CGcGOTO 
REM****F IRE NI SSILES******** 
REM***EXPLOS I ON*** 

21=PEEK<;N+l>:22=PEEK';N-l>:Z3=PEEK<N+40>:Z4=PEEK(H--40> 
POKE N+ 1,247: POKE N- 1,247: POKE N+40, 247: POKE N-46, 247 
POKE N+l,Zl:POKE N-l,Z2:FOKE N+40,Z3:FOKE N-40,Z4 



C,G:60SUB 21 7: GOTO 127 
127 



MUSIC "-CO- D-C-EC" 

RETURN 

rem******explos i on subrout i ne******** " 
if sl=10 then a$="left" 
if sr=10 then a$=" right" 

print"gsbsbthe game ubs won bv the " ;fl$- "pl aver' 
input" another game?" ; a$ 
if left*<», *>«■¥" then gosub 243: goto 93 

END 

ft$m* »:R=0:D=0:3L=0:SR=O:LM=ei:RM=O: RETURN 
POKE 4514,1 
FOR T=0 TO 255 
POKE 4513, T 
USR<68> 
NEXT T 
RETURN 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 39 



TREASU RE 

HUNT 

"Treasure" » the word on %W*g£&*£3££& 
Rumours abound .ha, .he Marple Caves_aboun^w 1 .h tie^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 




una inai me *i — -~- adventure game can muw uaw* 

. all as close to priceless as only an adven a bQnd of M 

Of course, there's a catch, for the rumours also ^^J isMe dogs and other 
without a scruple between them, elves, bats, mag wierder bemgs . 

On ,p of this, whisper .he ta^ive — £ = — s^ in p« 
condition, .here are deep pits into wh.ch many ^ ^ ieaves q 1q| , q be deslled . 

Can anyone be brave and foolish 
search of a sprinkling of rubies, pearl, gddcoin . r . ches? ^ ^ , b 

a gold watch, a golden harp, a magic (alk , hem QUt ol , here 
queuing up to roam around down there and Y^won^ ^ ^ 2Q trea8Ure8 . 

The firs, one to escape ^^^^. ^^^X; 
tobed by a pirate and who can find ^» ^ w ^ hi only lo0 ke en to offer h.m .heir 
sures will find the good people of Marple own , p . , ^ ^ 



es will tina ine i^ji-j- ^"of'courseJ and talk long and hard about many 
goods (at a reasonable £k» « cow* ^ invented an enjoyable adventure 

worthwhile invest 



,men,s. Lance .Micklus has invented an en ^ ~ 

— ^ ESS K 



humour. 



BY MURRAY SUMMERS 




i rem 



TRANSLATED FOR APPLE « 



n 



2 
3 
4 
o 

7 

10 
20 
50 



RE* 
REN 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 

TEXT I 
PRINT 
PRINT 



BY 

HURRAY R. SUMMERS 



35 

36 

40 
50 
60 

70 



HOME i DIM AU25) 
i WW 

! TREASURE 
m ^1 lAMCE M1CKLUS 
PRINT 

S"« Ml • 1* 1 "« 

JJV ' THE HARPUE CAVES i 
LQCATE» 1H KARPLET0WI8H1 , 
™*Z SMD TO HAVE »W» 
EHTREASURES IX THEH. " " 
PLORE THEH BECAUSE H IS 

M » THAT » _ 

«H "DRABOHS LIVE THERE 

1ND THE TREASURE. I » 
l E VOUR EYES AMD «Mf« 
LL TELL YOU IF DAM6ER LUR 

KS AHEAD." 

"JJ - 1 HOPE YOU BROUB 
HT A MAP. IN CASE YOU DIW 
J !?a HAVE TO MAKE ONE * 
S ME EXPLORE. 



BO 



90 



100 

no 



PIRATES, PEWl 
AND PRICELESS 

PLUNDER ■ 



120 ww. ww- mm 

KEY TO COMTINUE'P CALL 
56 

130 HOME 

UO FOR 1 ■ 1 TO 3 

150 M ■ 5 * FN W» 

u0 IF AIM) < > 0 1HW lW 

170 AIM) • 2 

180 NEXT 

190 FOR I • 3 TO 9 
00 M • 3 ♦ FN RIB8» 

220 AIM) ■ 1 

270 AIM) ■ 1 
290 NEXT 
290 RESTORE 
300 FOR M - 1« 23 
310 READ Al 

SSh.»37T0«1 

340 READ AIM) 
350 NEXT 
360 H ■ Oi MM 
TIOM 



- 7 



USER'S CAVE LOCA 



370M-0lK« BECOMES A 1 MHEM 
370 CARRY 1MB MA81C CARFET 



3B0 B - 200. RE« BATTERY POMER 

390 B L ! F Um BECOMES A 1 AFTE 
390 \ INVISIBLE 006 FOUMD 

400 WELCOME TO THE M 

410 ARPLE CAVES WERE YOU'LL Fl 
^MYSTERY, TREASURE AMD 
ADVENTURE. 

420 WW 
430 BOTO 500 

MO REM 
450 REM 
4^0 REM 
470 HOME 
460 B • B 
490 IF B 
500 IF M 
510 REM 

520 REM »>" 

ONS HHI 
530 REM 

M o IF FMR<200> 
1890 

550 IF FNR1200) 
5) THEM 3370 



MAIN ROUTINE 



0 THEN 3740 
0 THEM 31*0 



CHANCE S1TUAT1 



200 THEM BOSUB 
200 THEN BOSUB 




or ATARI (E, 



The World- beating 



ATARI PERSONAL 
COMPUTERS 

3 consoles available 

Atari 4Q0 with 16K RAM (AF 36P) £345 
Atari 4QO with 32K RAM (AF37S) £395 
Atari 800 with 16K RAM ( AF02C) £645 

t>«p>nd>bf to «*K) 

All consoles when connected to a standard UK colour (or 
black and white) TV set can generate the most amazing 
graphics you've ever seen. 




Atan 400 Console 



Look at what you get: 

* Background colour, plotting colour text 
colour and border colour settaWe to any 
oneoflBcotourswithBlevelsol 
illuminance 1 

* Video display has upper and lower case 
characters with true descenders, double 
and quad sire text and inverse video. 

* 57 Key keyboard (touch type on Atan 400) 
and four (unction keys. 

* Full screen editing and four way cursor 
control. 

* 29 keystroke graphics and plottable points 
up to 320 x192 (160 x 96 only withBK 

RAM 

* 40 character by 24 line display. 

* Extended graphics control and high speed 
action using a DMA chip with its own 
character set. 

* Player missile graphics. 

* Four programmable sound generators can 
be played individually or together and each 
has 1785 possible sounds playable at any 
one of eight volume settings, for game 
sounds or music. 

* Full software control of pitch, timbre and 
duration of notes in 4 octave range. 

* Four [oystick or paddle ports, sounds 
output to TV. 

* BASIC cartridge and 10K ROM operating 
system and full documentation 

irMpyim 

Maplin Electronic Supplies Ltd 

P.O. Box 3, Rayleigh, Essex. 

Tel; Southend 107021 55291 1/554155 



MORE HARDWARE 

Alari410CesseneRec«detlftF28Fl £50 
Atan B10 Dab Drive IAF06Q £345 
At*. 82? 40 column Thermal 
Printer IAF04E) £265 
Atan 850 Interface (AF29GI f135 
Joystick Controllers IAC37SI f 13.95 
Paddle Controllers (AC29G) £ 13.95 

16K RAM Memory Module (AFOBJt £65 
MUCH MORE FOR ATARI COMING SOON 



SOFTWARE 
lots and lots of amaang 
: Atari avatible NOW 

* Wwd Processor * VISICAIC 
p * ADVENTURE GAMES * Arcade Games 

♦ Trek Games * ASSEMBLER & 
DISASSEMBLER * FORTH * 
#30 GRAPHICS * Character Set 
Generator 

SEN0 S A E NOW FOR OUR LEAFLET 

IXHS2GI 



LE STICK 

For Atari Computer or Video Game 
Replaces standard ftlfcfc, but much 
easier to use Internal motion detectors 
sense hand movements large pusnbutlc 
on top ol Stick Squeeze Sticlt to treew 
motron A MUST tor SPACE INVADERS. 
STAR RAIDERS b ASTEROIDS 
0NIY £24.95 <AC45Y> 



Nota: Order codes shown m brackets 
All prices include VAT and shipment by 
Data Post 




Aran 800 Cc 



SO'e 





SPECIAL PACKAGE OFFER 

Dtsk based system lor f 7 25 with I e Suck 

The Atan 400 Console 

Spec* 32K RAM Module 

Atar.B10O.sk Dr.ve 

Disk Operating System 

Documentation 

Interconnecting Leads 

Everything in "Look at what you get" kst 

Can any other computer on the market 

offer an this at anything hke rfcs pnce 1 



VERSAWRITER 

12% 1 8m drawing board Orawmg on 
board is reproduced on TV via Atan with 
32K RAM and Cksk Drive Closed a»ees 
may be Mled m with one of 3 colours Ten 
ma, be added .n any one of 4 fonts Pwt 
brush mode select su* of brush and paint 
away A* brush mode shade m your 
drawng colour and density is up to you 
Plus many more features S a e lor once 
and further details 



l59 16' ^0, 74809^^ 



42 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



580 FMR,5) " 5) m * 

60SUB 2720 

S m « IF SPECIAL 

SITUATION Mill 
MO REH 

62 0 IF At*) • 2 THE* 3440 
6J0 IF AW • 4 THEM 2890 
MO IF Aim " 5 THEN 605UB 1770 



IF AW - 7 THEN PRINT I PRINT 
, print MHERE'8 A SHY L1TTL 
E ELF IN HERE HIDING SOHETHI 

N6. " 

If'aOI) • B THEN 2410 

Bp) 

REN ii i n WHERE YOU CAN 
60 NEXT 11111 
REN 

6Q5UB 3350 

710 Z » * 

720 60BUB 4120 

FOR N * 134 TO 134 
IF AIM) < 0 THEN 7BO 
PRINT TAB* 5)»'CAVE 'A(N)| 
IF AIM) « 0 THEN PRINT ■- 1 
HE "ENTRANCE" I 
PRINT 
NEXT 



650 



660 
670 
680 

690 

700 



730 
740 
750 
760 





770 
7B0 
790 
800 



REN 
REM 



llll 



WIT l« BATTERY 



810 
820 
830 
840 



TEST tun 
REH 



870 
180 



890 



900 



IF 8 > 190 THEN 880 
IF H < > 0 THEN 880 
ItfUT MO EXPLORE SOHE NORE 
TYPE I, ELSE TYPE 2'|» 
850 0 » VAL (J«) 
B60 IF J • 2 THEN 3810 
IF 3 < > 1 THEN 840 
IF B • 50 THEN PRINT i PRINT 
1 HOPE YOU BROUGHT HOR 
EFLASHLIBHT BATTER1EB.' 
IF B " 25 THEN PRINT I PRINT 
TOUR FLASHLIGHT IS STA 

RT1N6 TO M»* LnT "'' 
IF B B 8 THEN PRINT I PRINT 
VOUR FLASHL1BHT IS ALU 
OST OUT. BETTER LEAVE Rl 
6HT HON 1 

,10 |MI|) .»HH B08M2W 

5 S »»» w* 0 " °* VE 

•8 CONTENTS IUII 

940 REH 
950 K • 0 
960 L « 0 

970 FOR N ■ 134 TO 136 
9B0 J ■ A(N) 
,90 IF J < 0 THEN 1090 
1000 IF AU> • 5 THEN 1090 
010 IF IAU> > 0) I 4AU) < 10> 
M K - 0) THEN PRINT iK - 

1 



1020 



1050 



IF IAIJ) ■ 2) I <L • 0) THEN 
PRINT ' THERE ARE PUB 
NEARBY. NATCH YOUR BTEP.'iL 

1030 If'aU) - 3 THEN PRINT ' 
CAREFUL. THERE'S A P1RAT 

E NEARBY." 
1040 IF AlJ) " 4 THEN PRINT 

1 HEAR A HUN6RY DRA60N NA 

nine for his supper." 

IF AIJ) • THEN PRINT ' 
THERE'S A SI6N HERE THAT 

SAYS I 
»> D A 
N 6 E R «< a 

IF AU1 • 7 THEN PRINT " 

SOUNDS LIKE 80REBODY IS B 
1N6IN6. HUST BE AN ELF." 
IF AIO) » 8 THEN PRINT ■ 

THERE'S A 6TRAN6E HIST IN 
HERE " 

1F AU) ■ 9 THEN PRINT CHR1 
(34)"RUFF RUFF' CHRI 134)' 
I HEAR A DOG BARKING.' 

NEXT 

IF A1131) • 0 THEN 1200 
PRINT 

PRINT "YOU'RE CARRYING l" 
FOR N ■ 131 TO 133 
IF a(M) < 100 THEN 1180 

1150 2 « AW 

60SUB 4040 
PRINT At, 
NEXT 
PRINT 

IF A<N> < 100 THEN PRINT . 
GOTO 1440 

rem t*ANK IN 

THIS CAVE inn 



1060 



1070 



1080 



1090 

1100 

1110 

1120 

1130 

1140 



1160 

1170 

1180 

1190 

1200 

1210 
1220 



1330 IF 2 ■ 290 THEN 1440 
1340 IF 2 « 291 THEM M - t 
1350 IF 2 - 294 THEN BOSUB 1990 

13W IF 2 • 1 THEN 1440 

1370 IF 2 ■ 295 THEN 3650 

1380 FOR N - 131 TO 133 

1390 IF AIM) ■ 0 THEN A1N) ■ AW 

)iA(N) • Oi GOTO 1430 
1400 NEXT 

1410 PRINT " YOU CAN'T PICK 
IT UP NOW. YOU'RE CARRYING 
TOO HUCH." 
1420 GOTO 1440 

1430 PRINT 'O.K. YOU'VE GOT 'Al' 



1230 REH 

1240 PRINT 

1250 2 ■ AIN) 

1260 BOSUB 4040 

1270 PRINT ' THIS CAVE HAS 

Al" IN IT." 
1280 PRINT "DO YOU NANT TO TAKE 

IT WITH YOU V 
1290 INPUT MY OR N) "|J« 
1300 IF « - "N" THEN 1440 
1310 IF it < > "T* THEN 1290 
1320 IF 2 ■ 290 THEN BOSUB 1630 



1440 IF AU> « 7 THEN AtN> ■ 



307 



1450 REN 

1460 REH mil NHERE TO HEX 

T urn 

St- 

U NANT TO EXPLORE NEXT ? 

H 

1490 FOR N - 134 TO 134 
1500 IF A(N) - - » THEN 1520 
1510 IF J • A(N) THEN N • Ji GOTO 

470 
1520 NEXT 

1530 lFIN-lHU) 

j { . 94) I I INT U) ■ J> THEN 
M ■ Ji 60T0 470 
1540 PRINT " SORRY, BUT YOU 

CAN'T GO THERE FROH HERE. 
1550 GOTO 1480 
1560 REN 
1570 REN 

1580 REH SPECIAL SITUATION 

SUBROUTINES 
1590 REH - 



1600 
1610 



REH 
REH 



mi 



LOCK BOX tin 



REH 

FOR N « 131 TO 133 
IF A(N> • 289 THEN 1680 
NEXT 

PRINT 'YOU CAN'T TAKE IT. 
IT'S TOO HEAVY." 
RETURN 

PRINT ' THE BOX HAS TOO 
HEAVY SO I OPENED IT N1TH 
YOUR KEYB. BY THE NAY, THER 
E ISA RUBY IN IT THAT YOU CA 
N TAKE." 
1690 Aim ■ 308 
1700 2 ■ 308 
1710 BOSUB 4040 
1720 RETURN 

i™ £ • wchi 

NE urn 
1750 REN 
1760 VTAB 4 



1770 PRINT "THERE'S A VENDING HA 

CHINE HERE.' 
17B0 FOR N ' 131 TO 133 
1790 IF A(N) ■ 288 THEN 1820 
1800 NEXT 
1810 RETURN 

1820 PRINT 1 I'LL GET GONE B 
ATTERIE8 WITH ONE OF YOUR 60L 
D COINS." 

1830 B ■ 200 

1840 A(N) • 0 

1850 RETURN 

1840 REH 

1870 REH mil EARTHQUAKE n 

ill 
1880 REH 

1890 FOR N > 1 TO 10 
1900 Z » 3 ♦ FN RIB8) 
1910 SO BUB 3930 
1920 NEXT 
1930 VTA8 6 

1940 PRINT 1 GUESS NHAT ? N 
E JUST HAD AN EARTH-QUAKE. 
BUT I'M O.K..' 

1950 RETURN 

1960 REH 

1970 REH llin HA6IC HAND RO 

UTINE urn 
I960 REH 

1990 FOR N ■ 131 TO 133 
2000 IF A(N) ■ 293 THEN 2040 
2010 NEIT 

2020 PRINT ' IT'S STUCK IN T 
HE ROCKS AND CAN'T BE PULLE 
D OUT.' 

2030 I ■ li RETURN 

2040 PRINT ' LET HE USE YOUR 
MAG IC HAND A SEC. '| 

2050 FOR Z ■ 0 TO 2000) NEXT 

2060 PRINT I PRINT 'HOCUS, POCUS 

■ M 

2070 FOR 2 * 0 TO 2000i NEXT 
2080 A(N) « 3l0i Z * 0 
2090 RETURN 
2100 REN 

2110 REH Hill BATS SHON UP 

urn 

2120 VTAB 6i PRINT " 

2130 PRINT ' A SUPER BAT JUS 

T FLEN INTO THE CAVE AND PICK 

ED YOU UP.' 
2140 IF AI131) < > 0 THEN PRINT 

'YOU DROPPED ALL OF YOUR TR 

EASURES. " 
2150 FOR N - 131 TO 133 
2160 IF AIM) - 0 THEN 2180 
2170 A<0) » AIN)iA(N) ■ OiZ ■ Oi BOSUB 

3950 
2180 NEXT 
2190 N ■ FN RI941 
2200 IF A(N) < > 0 THEN 2190 
2210 N - N 

2220 PRINT 1 THE BAT JUST DR 
OPPED YOU INTO CAVE 'N' !!!' 



2230 PRINT 1 IF YOU'RE ALRIG 
HT HIT 1 CHRI (34) "RETURN' CHRI 
(34) | I CALL - 756 

2240 HOHE 

2250 RETURN 

2260 REH 

2270 REH inn PIRATE HERE I 

mi 
2280 REH 

2290 PRINT l PRINT " THERE N 

AS A PIRATE IN HERE." 
2300 IF At 131) < > 0 THEN PRINT 
HE JUST STOLE ALL YOUR 
TREASURES I 1 
2310 FOR N ' 131 TO 133 - 
2320 A(N) ■ 0 
2330 HEIT 
2340 I ■ N 
2350 GOSUB 3950 

2360 PRINT ' HE'S BONE HON.' 



mil HA6ICIAN ROUT 



2370 RETURN 
2380 REH 

I HE inn 
2390 REH 
2400 HOHE 

2410 VTAB 6i PRINT " 

2420 PRINT ' THERE'S A HA6IC 
IAN IN THIG CAVE. HE GAYS 
HE LOST HIS HA6IC BOOK. HE 
GAYGHE'D 6IVE YOU A GOLDEN H 
ARP IF YOU'LL TELL HIH NHE 
RE IT 16. TYPE IN THE CAVE 
NUHBER. IF YOU DON'T KNON, 
THEN JUGT ' 

2430 PRINT 'TYPE ' CHRI (34) '99' 
CHRI (34)".' 

2440 PRINT 

2450 INPUT 'WHERE'S HIS HA81C BO 

OK ? '|JI 
2460 J ■ INT ( VAL (Jt)> 
2470 IF (J < 0) ♦ (J > 95) THEN 

2520 
2480 IF A(J> < 
2490 A1N) - 309 
2500 A(J) • 0 
2510 GOTO 470 
2520 Z - N 
2530 GOSUB 3950 
2540 GOTO 470 
2550 REH 

2560 REH mil 
ROUTINE mil 
2570 REH 

25G0 VTAB 6i PRINT 

2590 PRINT ' THE INVISIBLE H 
AN IS HERE LOOKING Fife HIS 
INVISIBLE DOG. HE SAYS HE'L 
L GIVE YOU A 11000 RENARD 
IF YOU CAN TELL HIH WERE HI 
8 DOG IS, IF YOU DON'T KNON 
THEN GUESS.' 

2600 PRINT 

2610 INPUT 'NHAT CAVE IS THE INV 



> 295 THEN 3G40 



INVISIBLE HAN 




ISIBLE D06 IN ? *|JI 
2620 HOHE 

2630 J ■ INT ( VAL (JU) 
2640 IF (J < 0) ♦ (J > 95) ♦ 1 INT 
(J) < ) J) ♦ (A(J) < > 9) THEN 
RETURN 
2650 AIN) - 305 
2660 A(J) * 0 

2670 D > 1 
2680 RETURN 
2690 REH 

2700 REH mil HA6IC CARPET 
DISAPPEARS mil 

2710 REH 

2720 FOR N ■ 131 TO 133 

2730 IF A(N) ■ 291 THEN 2770 

2740 NEXT 

2750 H • 0 

2760 RETURN 

2770 AIN) « 0 

2780 IF N • 133 THEN 2830 

2790 FOR J ■ N TO 132 

2800 A(J) ■ A(J * 1) 

2810 A(J ♦ 1) ■ 0 

2820 NEXT 

2830 PRINT 1 POOF 1 ! ! YO 
UR NA6IC CARPET JUSTDISAPPEA 
RED.* 

2840 H ■ 0 

2850 RETURN 

2860 REH 

2870 REH inn DRAGON R0UT1N 

E urn 

2G80 REH 

2890 FOR N - 131 TO 133 

2900 IF AM) • 292 THEN 2930 

WIO NEXT 

2920 GOTO 3500 

2930 VTAB 6 

2940 PRINT 'YIKEB !!!! THERE'S 

A DRAGON IN HERE.' 

2950 PRINT 'GIVE HE YOUR BUN, OU 

ICK !!!• 

2960 FOR N > 0 TO 2000i NEXT 

2970 HOHE 

2980 FOR N ' 1 TO 5 

2990 VTAB FN R(23)i HTAB FN R( 

23)i PRINT 'BANG' ' " 
3000 FOR J ■ 0 TO 500i NEXT I HOHE 



3010 NEXT 

3020 PRINT TAB < FN R(30))|'P00 
F !!!' 

3030 FOR J ■ 0 TO 500i NEXT . HOHE 
3040 PRINT ' INCREDIBLE ??? 
THE DRAGON JUGT VANISHED 
NHEN I SHOT HIH RIGHT BE THE 
EN THE EYES.' 
3050 PRINT i PRINT ' BUT LOO 
K AT THIS. HE LEFT BEHIND 
HIS LITTLE BLACK BOOK NITH T 
HE ADDRESS AND PHONE NUHBER 
S OF EVERY BEAUTIFUL PRIN 
CESS IN PENNSYLVANIA.' 



44 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



THE ACORN ATOM 

NOW AT A PRICE EVERYONE CAN 
AFFORD £135 + VAT (For 8K ROM + 2K 

RAM + 1.8 p.s.u.) 

New price for 12K RAM + 12K ROM, incl. P.S.U. 

£199.00 + VAT 
Also available, ALL Acornsoft + Bug Byte Software 

(Phone for prices) 

WE ALSO STOCK THE ATARI 400 + 800, VIC-20, + 
BBC MICROCOMPUTER, TOGETHER WITH THEIR 
RANGES OF ACCESSORIES + SOFTWARE. 

Computers JorJBLll 

72 North Street, Romford, Essex. Tel: Romford 60725 



SILICON CENTRE 




■■■■■■■■■■■■ 




MAIL ORDER 

Price List, order form on request 

ATARI 400 (16K) 
ATARI 800 (16K) 
ACORN ATOM (Kit) 
ACORN ATOM (ready built) 
VIDEO GENIE 06K> 
GENIE II (16K) 
VIC 20 

EPSOM AND SEIKOSHA PRINTERS 



C335 
£625 
£140 
£174.50 
£329 



£18995 



Mattel Intellivision, Electronic Games, Chess. 
Software, Books, Accessories, etc. 

SILICON CENTRE 

21 Comely Bank Road, Edinburgh 4 
Tel : 332 5277 

VISA 



: 
: 

■i 
■i 

Si 




ELECTRONICS FOR THE 80s 



latronics 



Specialists 
Enter the NEW 
Computer Age 



MM 





• 12K MICROSOFT BASIC 

• 16K RAM 

• UHF MODULATOR 

• INTERNAL CASSETTE 

• 2nd CASSETTE INTERFACE 



SP(CIAl 

OISCOONT 

PRICE 



£299.00 



* EXPANSION BOX * 100's OF PROGRAMS 
AVAILABLE * TRS-80 LEVEL II 

* DISK DRIVE IF REQUIRED SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE 

II vou cannot call write for FREE illustrated leaflet 



IS HERE I 
NOW ! 



The fabulous TANTEL' adaptor it now available 

from Catronics at only £160 + VAT. 
This compact unit alts on your desk or chair and 
will drive virtually any television set, B/W or 
colour. Send to Catronics for full details. 



CREDIT TERMS available Pav bv Access. Sardaycard or 
K*V Catronics Creditcharge Card 



•noppari W«tcom« 



rOtVCS 



CATRONICS LTD (Dept. 19 ). 
COMMUNICATIONS HOUSE. 
20. WALLINGTON SQUARE. 
WALLINGTON. SURREY SM6 8RG 



01 SM 8700 19-" 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 45 



Acorn Atom 
CHESS 




THE PROGRAM YOU'VE 
BEEN WAITING FOR! 

Fantastic machine code choss game 'or the 12K Atom. 
Features include: split screen (high res. -alphanumer. 
ICS); many levels of play, castling end en passant, 
compute" plays black or white; can sot up pieces for 
chess problems Supplied on cesselle with instructions 
PRICE ONLY £9 00 DON'T FORGET — OUR PRICES 
INCLUDE VAT & POSTAGE 

INVADERS 

The best excuse lo expand your Atom II Is a superb 
version of Ihe standard game. lough and fas!" four 
Computer Nov '8V 12K. graphics mode 4 ONLV tB 00 



VIC-20 SOFTWARE NOW 
AVAILABLE 
Send SAE for details 

BUG-BYTE 

Microcomputer Software 
98-100 THE ALBANY, OLD HALL 
STREET, LIVERPOOL L3 9EP 



Sinclair ZX8I software 



ZXAS 

Full machine code assem- 
bler for the ZX81 and 8K 
ROM ZX80 (16K) complete 
with documentation. ONLY 
£3.95. 

ZXDB 

Machine code disassembler 
and debugging program — 
can be used with ZXAS. 
Many useful utilities. For 16K 
ZX81 and8K ROM ZX80. 
ONLY £5.95. 



ADVENTURE 

An adventure program entitled: THE DAMSEL AND 
THE BEAST. A Game of concentration and sus- 
pense in which you, the intrepid hero, must wander 
in the darkness and dangers of the Beast's palace, 
find the Damsel hiding or imprisoned there, kill the 
Beast, and then last but not least, lead the Damsel 
to the palace exit before she starves to death. There 
is an "easy" (?!| version for L-plate heroes, a 
medium game for the experienced adventurer, and 
a difficult game for the suicidal. An extremely 
complex, frustrating and entertaining game. 
PRICE ONLY £6.50 



PROGRAM PACK 4 for 16K ZXB1 

Two highly entertaining and addictive games for 

Ihe expanded 2X6'. written in machine code with 

very fast moving graphics ASTEROID BELT and 

SURROUND (? versions). 

BOTH PROGRAMS FOR ONLV £4 60 

PROGRAM PACK 6 for Ihe 16K ZX81 and 8K ROM 
ZX80 

Two programs for the expanded 2X81 to keep you 
entertained for hours! 3-D OXO is written In 
machine code, and is hard to bear The other is a 
compulsive adventure game called MARS 
RESCUE- 
BOTH PROGRAMS FOR ONLY €4 M 




NEW: VIEWTEXT 

A ten page information display system 
for the 16K ZX81. Can display both 
text and graphics in any sequence 
with variable speed. Many applica- 
tions including shop window displays, 
education, animation, etc. PRICE: £7.00 



BUG-BYTE 

Microcomputer Software 
98-100 THE ALBANY 
OLD HALL STREET 
LIVERPOOL L3 9EP 



ALL PRICES INCLUSIVE 
TELEPHONE: 051-227 2642 




Acorn Atom 

747 




FLIGHT SIMULATION 
PROGRAM FOR THE 12K ATOM 

Written for Bug-byte by a 747 pilot. Accurate simulation of 
a 747's cockpit display (airspeed, altitude, rate of climb, 
attitude, flaps, etc., and graphic display of horizontal 
situation and attitude); allows you to guide your craft to 
the landing strip. On making your final approach the 
display changes to a high-resolution 3D representation of 
the runway coming up to meet you. A real test of skill. 
Finding the runway is quite a challenge — landing safely 
is even more difficult. If you succeed, you are awarded a 
skill rating and the chance to take off and try again. 
REQUIRES FLOATING POINT ROM PRICE ONLY £8.00 



ALL PRICES INCLUSIVE 
TELEPHONE 051 227 2642 



■%Vf*tV»V 






100 THE MBANY 



OLOMAH SI RUT 



I IVlFtPOOl 13 9£P 



ACORN ATOM 



PIN8ALL 6K. Gr. 2 


£4.50 


ATOM BREAKOUT 4K. Gr. 1 


£4.00 


FRUIT MACHINE 8K. Gr. 2 


£4.00 


STAR TREK 12K, F.P. 


£5.00 


DISASSEMBLER 2K 


£4.00 


UFO BOMBER 7K 


£4.00 


LABYRINTH 12K. Gr. 2A, F.P 


£6.95 


LUNAR LANDER 12K. Gr. 4 


£5.50 


BACKGAMMON 7K 


£7.00 


GOLF 7K, F.P. 


£5.00 


TYPIST 7K 


£4.00 


LAST RUN 7K 


£3.00 


WIGGLE * RHINO 10K 


£5.00 


SQUARES - SIMON • PARACHUTE BK 


£5.00 


MINI-BREAKOUT f MINI-INVADERS 2K 


£4.50 


STATISTICS 14 programs) 12K 


£20.00 


2114L MEMORY CHIP 


£2.00 


C12 CASSETTE 


£0.70 



AU PBICES INCLUDE VAT & POSTAGE 

24 Hour answering service 
on 051 227 2642 for Access orders. 



E3 



PLEASE SUPPLY: 

I enclose a cheque/PO for £. made payable to 

Bug-byte, OR debit my 

Access card number 

Signature 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



BUG BYTE: 98-100 THE ALBANY, OLD HALL STREET. 
LIVERPOOL L3 3EP 



46 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



3060 PRINT 

3070 PRINT ' HIT THE ' CHRI 
(34) 'RETURN' CHRI 134)" KEY 
WHEN YOU CATCHYOUR BREATH.' | 
i CALL - 756 
I 3080 AIH) - 306 
3090 B ■ B ♦ 1 
13100 SOTO 470 
3110 REH 

3120 REN mil AT ENTRANCE R 

OUTINE inn 
3)30 REN 

3140 IF AI13I) ■ 0 THEN 3210 
3150 FOR N - 131 TO 133 
3160 IF A(N) ■ 0 THEN 3200 
3170 J » 96 

3180 IF A(J> < > 0 THEN J * J ♦ 

li OOTO 3180 
3190 A(J) - A(N) 

3200 HEIT 

3210 IF A(96) ' 0 THEN 3270 
3220 PRINT ' SO FAR, YOU'VE F 
OUND THESE TREASURES IN THE C 
AVE8 r 
3230 FOR N ■ 96 TO 130 
3240 IF A(N) - 0 THEN 3270 
3250 2 ■ AIM) i 60SUB 4040i PRINT 

At', '|l IF PEEK (36) > 28 THEN 
PRINT 

3260 NEXT 

3270 FOR N « 131 TO 133iAIN) ■ 0 

i NEXT 
3280 PRINT i PRINT 
3290 PRINT i PRINT ' YOU'RE 
AT A CAVE ENTRANCE THAT 
LEADS TO i" 
3300 B ■ B + 1 
3310 SOTO 710 
3320 REH 

3330 REH mil IN ROUTINE n 

in 
3340 REH 

3350 PRINT I PRINT i PRINT " 

YOU'RE IN CAVE "N" WHICH LE 
ADS TO l" 
3360 RETURN 
3370 REH 
3380 REH 

3390 REH END OF PROGRAM RO 

mm 

3400 REH 



Mil FELL INTO A P 



REH 
REH 

IT inn 
REH 

VTAB 61 PRINT »l PRINT ' 

SORRY, BUT I TRIED TO MR 
N YOU." 

PRINT 'YOU FELL INTO A DEEP 
PIT AND KILLED YOURSELF 
!!!' 
3460 END 
3470 



3410 
3420 

3430 
3440 



3450 



TREASURE 

HUNT 




3480 



■ in 
mi 



EATEN BY THE 



REH 
DfiA60N 
3490 REH 

3500 VTAB 6i PRINT " 

3510 PRINT ■ SORRY, BUT I TR 
IED TO TELL YOU ABOUT TH 
AT SOUND. SUPPER IS HON BE I 
N6 SERVED HERE IN THE DfiASO 
N'S CHAMBER..." 

3520 PRINT i PRINT i FOR I " 1 TO 
500l NEXT l INVERSE I PRINT 
'AND YOU ARE THE SUPPER !!!' 
■ NOR HAL 

3530 END 

3540 REH 

3550 REH urn ROOF FELL IN 

iiiii 
3560 REH 

3570 VTA61 PRINT " 

3560 PRINT ' THE ROOF JUST F 
ELL IN AND BURIED YOU ALIV 
E. TOO BAD I DON'T HAVE A 
SHOVEL OR I'D DIG YOU OU 



T. 



3590 
3600 
3610 
3620 
3630 

3640 
3650 
3660 
3670 



PRINT 

PRINT 'SEE YAH LATER." 



REH 

REH mil PICKED UP HAS. 
1C BOOK inn 
REH 
HOHE 

VTAB 6i PRINT " 

PRINT 1 I DON'T THINK Y 
OU SHOULD HAVE DONE THAT. T 
HE HA8ICIAN MHO OMNS THAT HA 
SIC BOOK PUT A SPELL ON IT. 



ANYBODY THAT TRIES TO PIC 
K IT UP TURNS INTO A FROG." 
3680 PRINT 

3690 PRINT "EXCUSE HE WHILE I LO 

OK FOR SOW FLIES." 
3700 END 
3710 REH 

3720 REH Hill BATTERIES MEN 

T DEAD iiiii 
3730 REH 

3740 VTAB 6i PRINT " 

3750 PRINT " HON LOOK NHAT Y 
OU DID. YOUR FLASH-LIGHT HE 
NT OUT AND YOU FELL INTO A P 
IT AND KILLED YOURSELF. TO 
0 BAD. ESPECIALLY A 

FTER YOU HERE DOING 80 NELL. 
■ 

3760 END 
3770 REH 

3780 REH mil USER QUITS n 

ill 
3790 REH 
3800 VTA6 

3810 PRINT 1 THE TREASURES A 
RE YOURS TO KEEP. 600D LUC 
K !!!' 

3820 END 

3830 REH mil HA8ICIAN UPSE 

T iiiii 
3840 VTAB 6 

3850 PRINT " YOU'VE HADE THE 
MAS I C I AH VERY ANGRY. CAVE "J 
' DOESN'T HAVE A HA8IC BOOK 
IN IT." 

3860 FLASH I PRINT "TO PUNISH YO 
U, THE HAS I C I AH CASTS A 
SPELL ON YOU AND HON YOU'RE 
ONLY TNO INCHES TALL.'ji NORHAL 

3870 PRINT " MORSE YET, THE 
HA6ICIAN PUT YOU INTO A S 
HALL JAR. IF YOU EVER SET 0 
UT OF THIS HESS, LET HE KHO 
N." 

3880 END 

3890 REH 

3900 REH UTILITY SUBR0UT1N 

ES 

3910 REH 

3920 REH 

3930 REH mil HOVE 1TEH TO 
MEM CAVE LOCATION iiiii 



COMPUTER 8t VIDEO GAMES 47 



Combine accurate flight characteristics with the best in animation graphics 
and you'll have SubLOGIC's 

T80-FS1 Flight Simulator 

forthe TRS-80 



SubLOGIC s T80-FS1 is the smooth, realistic 
simulator that gives you a real-time, 3-D. 
out-ot-the-cockpit view of flight. 

Thanks to fast animation and accurate repre- 
sentation of flight, the non-pilol can now learn 
basic flight control, including take-offs and 
landings! And experienced pilots will recog- 
nize how thoroughly they can explore the 
aircraft s characteristics 

Once you ve acquired flight proficiency, 
you can engage in the exciting British Ace 
3-D Aerial Battle Game included in the 
package. Destroy the enemy s fuel depot 
while evading enemy fighters 

Computer and aviation experts call the 
T80-FS1 a marvel of modern technology 
You'll simply call it fantasticf 



Special Features: 

• 3 frame- per-second flicker tree 
animation 

• Maximum transfer keyboard input 

- Constant feedback cassette loader 

Hardware Requirements: 

- Radio Shack TRS-80. Level 1 or 2 

• 16K memory 

• Nothing else! 

Only 

INCLUDING VAT POST& 
PACKING. SEND £1 .00 FOR 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF 
OVER 200 TRS-80 PROGRAMS 





MICROCOMPUTER 
APPLICATIONS 

42A CHURCH STREET. 
CAVERSHAM, READING. 
RG4 8AU. ENGLAND 
TEL: (0734) 470425 




The prize kitty starts at £50 5 

Watch how the score and money increase during J 
the year' Will your name leak 
mis suae*"! igSZ''"'" 



VIC 20 SOFTWARE 



The Great Balloon RaoaiTnemxKM 

first computer oa»oon raced This is a 
supe* graphc arcade type game which 
requires skrll. cooroinabon and 
aeterm«r\afoft to guide a waving ooooing 
Daitooo a'ound me obslacle course 
Practice will enable you to gel belter. 
Out now much practice wiif you need lo win 
the great Dalloon race" 1 Every entrant will 
13 batoon tags to send m the r*o.n«tv 
score they acrv-eved Trie nighest score receded 
and verified us-ng the games soecal check symoois 

ireteasethepnje 
'IC6 40CotPET 

Ine VAJ&R&P 



ONLY 



£16 




I The timt computer graphic 
adventure game 10 have real gold' I 
The Mr Micro lime terminal win leach you a littte 
o* tne background to ine 1 Sa9 California 
God Rush & then transport you OacM <n lime lo th, 
lodgement creative thought and slarrvna to re-i 

The prog/am contains several seperale games and diversions which you can enr 
timei time agam Can you Deal a" the other prospectors who are searching fori 
Word? tf you are cievet enough lo find me wad »ir»t then you win win me Real Gold 1 Accept 
the challenge now. you w"l enjoy this unique 
adventure (Out you might enroy'inckng the Gold 
even more 1 ) 



our powers 0" 
prospectors 

Xe Golden 



ONLY 



fOR VIC 20 



£16 



ine VATS P&P 



DECEMBER 1981 
GOLD VALUE MAS REACHED 
CI SO. RISING WITH EVERY 
PROGRAMME SOLO. No one 

has even got dose yell Is there 
no true advent ure* oul there* 



SPECIALOFFER!2PROGRAMSFORTHEVIC20-FORONLY£6.00 

RAINBOW PASSAGE- A HUMAN vb COMPUTER BOARD GAME 
VIC POT SHOT- HUMAN REACTION GAME Of PER ENDS 3 1 si JANUARY 1982 



T 



rOM HI* 111 THAT WODKS Bt*UT*U 



W POBOX24 



I FURTHER DEALER ENQUIRIES ARE NOW INVITED 

48 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



Mini Floppy Disks 



W And sialic envelope! 

* Quality, double density media 

# Soil sectored 

♦ Labels with write protect 
+ Reinlorced centres 

# library cotes tree with fern 
Guaranteed quality - Any fouhy 
disks should be returned lo us 
within 1 2 months of purchase with 
proof of purchase for replrxr-mefil 
by relum ol post 

Mini Floppy SS/DD 

Mini Floppy SS/DD x 10 

Mini Floppy SS/DD * 50 

Mini Floppy SS/DD x 100 .... . 

Mini Floppy DS/DD 

Mini Floppy DS/DD x 10 

Mini Floppy DS/DD x 50 

Mini Floppy DS/DD x 100 




Ne« 


Vat 


Tola! 


250 


38 


2 88 


2000 


300 


23 00 


8750 


13 13 


10063 


15000 


22 50 


172 50 


400 


60 


460 


3300 


4 95 


37 95 


15000 


22 50 


172 50 


27500 


41 25 


31625 



Mail Orders lo: 

MICROCOMPUTERS AT LASKYS 
MAIL ORDER DCPT. 
FREEPOST (No Stamp required) 
LIVERPOOL L7 2AB 



24 Hr Telephone Oedn 
Cord Orden 051 236 0707 




3940 REM 

3930 Y » 3 * FN R(88> 
3960 IF A(Y> < ) 0 THEM 3930 
3970 IF IY ■ Mi ♦ (Y ■ 21 THEM 3 
950 

3980 A(Y> > AIZ) 
3990 AIZ) ■ 0 
4000 RETURN 
4010 REN 

4020 REM inn HAKE At NAME 
OF TREASURE mil 
REM 

RESTORE 

FOR I ■ 0 TO Z - 288 
READ Al 



4030 
4040 
4050 
4060 
4070 
4080 
4090 
4100 

4110 
4120 



NEXT 
RETURN 
REN 
REM 



4130 AI134 
3)) 



IN6 CAVE NUMBERS i 
REN 

FOR It ■ 0 TO 2 
♦ X) < AU37 



liSET UP CONNECT 
III 



♦ I MM 



4140 

4150 

4160 

4170 

4180 

4190 

9910 

9911 

9912 

9913 

9914 

9915 

9916 

9917 

991B 

9919 

9920 

9921 

9922 

9923 

9924 

9925 

9926 

9927 

9928 

9929 

9930 

9931 

9932 

9997 

9998 

9999 



NEXT 
RETURN 
REM 
REN 
REN 
REM 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



TREASURE LIST 



'SOLD COINS 
'SOME KEYS 
"A LOCK MIX 
a A MAGIC CARPET 
-AN OLD BUN 
-A MAGIC HAND* 
"A BWRD' 
DATA "A MAGIC BOOK 
DATA 'AN OLD CLOCK 
DATA 'FURS 
DATA a A SILVER BELL 
DATA -A NECKLACE 
DATA "A PEARL 
DATA a A DIAMOND 
DATA 'A BOLD NATCH 
DATA "AN EMERALD 
DATA MEMELRY 
DATA 'A 11000 BILL 
DATA -A BLACK BOOK 
DATA 'SOME ELF FOOD' 
DATA 'A RUBY 
DATA 'A GOLDEN HARP 
DATA 'A 8N0RD 
REM 
REM 

NG CAVES 
REM 



DATA FOR CONNECT I 



10000 DATA 1,94,-1 



10001 DATA 

10002 DATA 

10003 DATA 

10004 DATA 



0,2,3 

1,4.3 
1,4.7 
2.8,9 



10005 


DATA 


2,10,11 


10034 


DATA 


10006 


DATA 


3,12,13 


10035 


DATA 


10007 


DATA 


3.14,15 


10036 


DATA 


10008 


DATA 


4,16,17 


10057 


DATA 


10009 


DATA 


4,18,19 


10056 


DATA 


10010 


DATA 


5,20,21 


10059 


DATA 


10011 


DATA 


5,22,23 


10060 


DATA 


10012 


DATA 


6,24,23 


10061 


DATA 


10013 

• * 


DATA 


6,26,27 


10062 


DATA 


10014 


DATA 


7,28,29 


10063 


DATA 


10013 


DATA 


7,30,31 

W W 


10064 


DATA 


10016 


DATA 


8,32,33 


10065 


DATA 


10017 


DATA 


8,34.33 


10066 


DATA 


10018 


DATA 


9,36,37 


10067 


DATA 


10019 


DATA 


9,38,39 


10068 


DATA 


10020 


DATA 


10,40,41 


10069 


DATA 


10021 


DATA 


10,42,43 


10070 


DATA 


10022 


DATA 


11,44,43 


10071 


DATA 


10023 


DATA 


11,46,47 


10072 


DATA 


10024 


DATA 


12,4G,49 


10073 


DATA 


10025 


DATA 


12,30,31 


10074 


DATA 


10026 


DATA 


13,52,53 


10075 


DATA 


10027 


DATA 


13,54,35 


10076 


DATA 



27,33,73 

27,56,75 

28,55,76 

26,58,76 

29,57,77 

29,60,77 

30,59,78 

30,62,76 

31,61,79 

31,32,79 

32,33,80 

34,35,80 

36,37,81 

36,39,61 

40,41,62 

42,43,62 

44,45,83 

46,47,83 

46,49,64 

50,51,64 

52,53,85 

54,33,85 

36,37,86 




10028 DATA 

10029 DATA 

10030 DATA 

10031 DATA 

10032 DATA 

10033 DATA 

10034 DATA 
10033 DATA 

10036 DATA 

10037 DATA 

10038 DATA 

10039 DATA 

10040 DATA 

10041 DATA 

10042 DATA 

10043 DATA 

10044 DATA 

10045 DATA 

10046 DATA 

10047 DATA 

10048 DATA 

10049 DATA 

10050 DATA 

10051 DATA 

10052 DATA 

10053 DATA 



14,56,57 
14,56,59 
15,60,61 
15,62,63 
16,63,64 
16,34,64 
17,33,65 
17,36,65 

16,35,66 

16,38,66 

19,37,67 

19,40,67 

20,39,68 

20,42,68 

21,41,69 

21,44,69 

22,43,70 

22,46,70 

23,45,71 

23,48,71 

24,47,72 

24,50,72 

25,49,73 

25,52,73 

26,31,74 

26,54,74 



10077 DATA 58,39,86 

10078 DATA 60,61,67 

10079 DATA 62,63,87 
10060 DATA 64,65,66 
10081 DATA 66,67,68 
10062 DATA 66,69,89 

10083 DATA 70,71,89 

10084 DATA 72,73,90 

10085 DATA 74,75,90 

10086 DATA 76,77,91 

10087 DATA 78,79,91 
10068 DATA 60,61,92 

10089 DATA 82,83,92 

10090 DATA 64,85,93 

10091 DATA 66,87,93 

10092 DATA 68,69,94 

10093 DATA 90,91,94 

10094 DATA 0,92,93 

65000 REM III TREASURE HUNT 

65000 REM III BY LANCE NICKLUS 

65000 REM III TRANSLATED FOR 

65000 REM III APPLE H 

65000 REM III BY 

65000 REM Ml MURRAY R. SUMMERS 

65000 REM lit SPRINGFIELD, PA 

COMPUTER 8t VIDEO GAMES 





Never in the history of Necromancy had there been such a 
task. Defeating a iiery dragon with nothing more than a 
hoary old spell tor turning snow into sleeping tablets. 

When the fearsome and foul dragon, who we shall refer to 
henceforth as "Horace", came down from the mountains, the 
villagers feared the worse. Rightly as it turned out. For 
Horace immediately set to, devouring maidens, breathing 
fire, smoke and halitosis, putting up mortgage rates and 
generally behaving in the sort of way that would give 
football supporters a good name. 

Ail this action occurs off-screen and I did not program any 
of it into the game ... be thankful tor small mercies! 

Horace's anti-social behaviour is a problem which cannot 
be tolerated, so the local wizard was called for and 
appraised of the situation and the need for urgent action. 

Wizards have often appeared in adventure-type games but 
none ever had to work under the same restrictions as our 
hero. Butch. 

All through wizard school. Butch would misbehave, 
preferring to smoke behind the apothecary labs than learn 
his frog-turning tables. 

So Butch left wizard school with only a C.S.E. pass in 
Magic Sleeping Pill from Snow transmuting — generally 
considered a soft subject. 

Butch can only manage five pills anyway. They appear in 
the sky at the top of the screen and fall rapidly to the ground. 
You can direct them into Horace's mouth by pressing "space". 
Three is enough to put even a dragon to sleep. 

If less than three pills enter Horace's mouth, he 
respond by burning Butch's head off — a violent g< 
haps, but then life's like that W sometimes. 



r C 



> ■■ 



50 COMPUTEH & VIDLO 



r* 



0 



a: 



s 



} 



i h 



MsJDRFiGGN DRUGGIN' *' 



BY PAUL JmV. 13* 6. 81" 



DEVOURING 



i0 print m :m 

20 PR I NT "d 
38 FOR 1=1 TG2000 : NEXT 

46 PRINT":* FEROCIOUS DRAGON HAS BEEN 
50 PRINT" W1AIDENS. THIS IS NOT GOOD." 
60 PRINT"XtfOU ARE R FEARLESS WIZARD. " 
70 PRINT":?n"HIS IS GOOD. " 
88 PRINT"flTT'OU HAVE THE POWER TO SUMMON" 
•=•0 PRINT"flJsFIVEi MAGIC SLEEPING PILL*" 
100 PRINT "STHESE ARE TO EE DIRECTED INTO." 
HO PRINT"WTHE DRAGON" S MOUTH." 
120 PRINT"*TTHIS IS VEPV GOOD." 

138 PRINT "WsfTHREE! PILLS WILL MAKE H-M SLEEP. 
140 PRINT"J?TTHEN VOU WIN. " 

150 PRINT"XPRES3 SiSPACEl BAR TO DIRECT PI-L." 
1S n PR I NT " IM»M»»»M»FRESS RNV KEV TO ^ ThPT" 
17tt POKE 152 ^8 WAIT15t:,l POKE152,0 
188 A=160 B=32 : C=95 18=223 E-185 F=233 
190 G=206H=2O5 1=111 J=72 K =207 ^=231 




COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 51 



m MM9191 BB=33231 ■ CC=33271 : DP=3331 1 ■ EE=33354 : FF=33394 PI =6 : SO0 



210 
220 
23(3 
240 
25G 
268 
270 
280 
290 
390 

316 
320 
330 
340 
358 
360 
370 
330 
390 

400 

4U3 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
430 
490 

500 

510 

520 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
530 
590 

600 

610 
620 
630 

640 

650 
660 
670 
630 
690 

700 

710 





El =33633 
PRINT "fl" 

PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT* 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT' 1 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT ' 
p RINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT" 
PRINT**" 

PRINT" " M 

REM MOUTH CLOSED 

POKEftfl/ H POKERfl+1 > H • POKEftfl+2* H POK'EBB, C - POKEBB+ 1 . fi POKEBB+2, L POKECC, B 
POKECC+1 . E : POKECC+2 ■ B ■ FOKECC+3, 1 : PGKECC+4, 1 ■ PGKEBD, B POKEDD+1 , B 
POKEDB+2, B : F0KEHB-i-3.fi POKEDD+4, hi '• POKE EE. fi : POKEEE+1; fl POKEFF, fl 
M= I NT < 2@00*RNIK 1 > > 
FORV=lTOrr NEXT 
REN MOUTH OPEN 

POKEHfi, C : PGKEHA+ 1 , B ■ POKESjfl+2, C : POKE BE . B POKEBB+ 1 > B FOKEBB+2, J • POKECC, D 
PQKECC+ 1 . D : POKECC+2, F : P*JKE0C+3, fl : POKECC+4 . L : PGKEDD, C POKEDD+1 . fl 
PQKEDD+2, fl = POKEDB+3, fl : POKEDD+4 , E : POKEEE . B POKEEE+1 , F • POKEFF . F 
PI=PI-1 : IFPI<lflND3CC3THENOOSUB970 
IFSC-1 THFNGOSUB1058 
IFSC=2THENG0SUBi 1 00 

HEN6OSUB1030 : GOSUBl 190 
IFSC=4THENGQSUB1050 6OSU81100 : GOSUB1150 
IFPK1 flNDSC C3THENPR I NT " M/MUNM U '■ GOTO: 
IFPIOTHEN910 
REM PILL DROPPER 

FORI I=327?4T0336148T£P*48 ; POKE 1 1 ■ tfl 
FOR.JJ=lTO;j:N£XTJJ 

PUKE I I. B 
P=151 :Ll»*PEEK<P) 
IFLL=6THEN7O0 
NEXT 1 1 
GOTO460 

FORZZ=IITCK 11+32; 
POKE33053, J i POKE 33533, J 




52 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




Authors: Ian Stewart & Robin Jones 

The reader-friendly guide to getting started with the 
Sinclair ZX81. Includes an introduction to looping and 
branching, graphics, subroutines, and debugging 
techniques, with over 50 programs designed to run 
on the standard 1K memory. 

Approx. 130 pages Paperback £4.95 
Publication: 4 January 1982 

ISBN 0 90681 2 17 8 



Published by: Shiva Publishing Ltd.. 4 Church Lane, 
Namwich. Cheshire CW5 5RQ Telephone: (0270) 628272 






IMM toopiv II* •MB' 



_<XWV/COpMaof: ««. POM. BVTf & HAM 

mc. C4 « p~ cop,. a~*~ *o»« b. M p«.« .• S-w. Robing i,d For payment by Access/Ame.ican Express 

NAME (Capitals please) . 

Full postal address 



Card No 



Order from your Bookseller, or fill in the coupon. 




* SOFTWARE # PERIPHERALS 
# COMPUTER CHESS GAMES 

■BP 




»-»bi Bts r a* am Dt At t w 

ATARI 



ACTIVISION 





Commodore VIC due 



Dept.cvG, 50 Newton St.Off Piccadilly, 
Manchester M1 2EA. Tel: 061 2363083. 

WE ARE AT THE CORNER NEWTON ST./ HILTON ST. 



OF 

for your 

APPLE II, APPLE III, TRS 80 
GENIE, ATARI & BBC 

1 Horseshoe Yard 
off Brook St 
London W1 
Tel 01-493 3420/0566 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 53 



720 
73* 
740 
750 
76tf 
770 
780 
790 



810 
320 



358 
860 
370 
880 
390 

900 



340 
950 
960 
970 
930 
990 

1000 
1010 
1020 
1030 
1040 
1050 
1860 
1070 
1080 
1 090 
1100 
1110 

1120 
1130 
1140 
1150 
1160 
1170 
1130 
1190 



NEXTVV : RETURN 
F0RVV= 1 TO 1 0 = POKE El , ft 
FORG=1TO100:NEXTG 
P0KEE1 .. 209 : P0KEE1+1 # R 
FQRH»1TO30:NEXTN 
NEXTYV : RETURN 
FORVV=1TO10 • F0KEE1 , A 
FORG=1TQ10© : NEXTG 
POKEE 1 f 209 : POKEE 1 + 1 / ft 
FGRN=l'T030-NEXTN 
NEXTVV : RETURN 




54 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




IFPEEK C2Z+1 W2THEN83© 
IFPEEK<ZZ*1 >0»JHEN' 
PDKEZZ/81 

FORQQ* 1 TO50 : NEXTGG 
POKEZZ, B : NEXT22 : GO 1 0460 
FORSS=22TO33647STEP+40 

POKE33053, B • P0KE33533, B 
I FSS+40OBTH£NSS=SS- 1 

P0KESS,31 

F0RQQ=1 TO50 : NEXTQG 
POKESS, B I NEXTSS ; GOTO460 
830 SC=SC+1 :FORfin=0TO100STEP10 
340 POKE33053, B : PQKE3353& B 
IFSC-MM>9TH£N900 
P0KE33747, <WM/10>+48 
P0KE3374S, <SC-MH>+4S 
POKE I, B 
G0T046S 
NEXTMM 

9 1 8 PR I NT " flHMMMPflffl^^ W I Hi" ; 

920 POKEE 1 , 227 i POKEE 1 + 1 > 227 

925 PQKE33210, 202 P0KE32791 , 26 : F0KE32S32, 26 • F0KE3287 
930 PRINT " PRESS RNV REV FOR ANOTHER GAME" 

POKE 158,0 

POKE152,0WMIT153, 1 -POKE152.0 
GOTO 130 

PRINT M rTTTTl@@@. J " 

pRiNT ,, Nflee.y M nrjfc 

PR J NT" NJMSS/" ri 1 

PRINT" NMMH N 
PRINT" n^SCO - * " 
PRINT" 
RETURN 

FORVV= 1 T01 O : POKEE 1 , 227 • POKEE 1 + 1 > 227 
FORG=1TO100-NEXTG 
POKEE 1 , 209 ■ P0KEE1+1 > A 
F0RN=1 TO30 ; NEXTN 



David Attenborough cap- 
tured some of the excite- 
ment of the story of Life in 
his recent T.V. series, now it 
is possible to capture the 
rest on an Acorn Atom. 

Life is the popular com- 
puter cell generation game 
which was first invented by 
Cambridge mathematician 
John Horton Conway. A cell 
pattern is plotted on the 
computer screen and when 
the program is run. three 
simple rules which the cells 
have to adhere to. come into 
operation. 

The rules of Life are: 
Birth, Survival and finally 
Death. 

Birth — if an optimum 




number of cells (3) surround 
an empty cell it will be 
brought to life on the next 
generation. 

Survival — if a cell has 
either two or three neigh- 
bours it will remain alive in 
the next generation. 

Death — if a cell has less 
than two living neighbours 



W 81 



zb *En life 

30 REfl BY Tin JHCK30N- 
40 TNI4 

so gosubi 

60 HM3506; D"H+?ze 1 B"O*3Z0 

'8 REn n holds prttern 

TO Ftn D MOLDS NEIGHBR COUNT 
TO PEN INIT.PRTT.SWVED IN B 
1TO G*S 

I1B PI" LL0.3313.G513 

iZB FOR I-B TTJ13; 331 1 *GGI* - 1 - NEXT 

13B Din W64 

14V F.BZ1 

130 G05U8W1 GOSUBI" 

1G« P. 06 

1TB GOSUBI 

100TFOR 1*0 TO 319 STEP 4J NEXT 
190 GPSUBUl GOSUBT i iGOSUO P 

200 REn GPg WttH I I lEKH 

?lWCTO!«tn OJF50P P03N 

ZZB G03UBC 

Z3B DO 
Z4B GOSUB? 

230 G03UBC 

250 REJ1 CNECK CPS* CTRL3 

ZTB IF G"T C«C*ZB; IP C>31» 3-C-32B 

280 IP G*0 C"C*1! t^ PCW* C-C-2B 

ZTO IP G»10T CC-E0J ir C<B C»C»3ZB 

3BC IP G»10» D»>IJ IP C*20«15OR C— 1 C"C*Z0 

310 GC3UBC 

7Z0 PCT IF 3P. INVER T CELL 

33B IF C-B PLOT 1 4 . < L4*B«*ZZ ' - < C' r ZBTE*Z 1, 
3*0 FTJR 1«0 TO 300; NEXT 
33B UNTIL C"13!PCT UNTIL RTN 
360 FOR 1-0 TO 315 STEP 41 ■ 1 1*1X1 
37B GOSUBC 
300 GOSUBJ 

3TO f»«;n»0 

400 PRINT N- W000008 
410TDO 

m POR 1-0 TO 31? STEP 4;D»I-B;NCXT 



then it will die of loneliness, 
more than three and it will 
die of overcrowding. 

So after each generation 
the screen changes, with 
some cells giving birth to 
others, some merely living 
on and some dying out. 

There is a limit to this 
computerised version of Life 



though, to prevent it getting 
out of hand, all the action 
takes place within four bor- 
ders. A cell is considered to 
be neighbours with another 
if the two share a common 
border or corner — so 
diagonal neighbours count 
as well. 

Then the laws of Life are 
applied simultaneously 
with every square on the 
board being checked. This 
is a task ideally suited to a 
computer and the excite- 
ment comes from plotting in 
an original pattern to pro- 
duce the most exciting 
action. It has all helped to 
turn Life into a computer 
game classic. 




LAR EVOL VEMENT 



43B PCT TCm UELL3 
44B LINK 330 

430 PET! GENCPnTC NEXT GEN. 

400 LINK GOT 

470 N*N»WIF *"0 

480 PRINT N, 03000800 

490 I"0 

3B0 DO I"I*1 

310 link LL0 

3Z0 UNTIL I>V OR G<233 

330 UNTIL G<Z33 

340 F.B3B PRESS G-'-TO GO ON"' " —OP"" 

330 P. "PRESS P""POP TOUP* ' "QPIGinWL" ' "t-ni t gith- 

360 P. ' " —OP" - ' 'PRESS 3" "TO STnRT"' -nFRESH" 

3F04GO3UBK 

300 IP G»3S G0SUBJ;G0T0t 

390 IP GR31 Ij OTTJP 

000 IP G"48 G0TO4 

610 G03UBV f GOSUBTi > G03UBD 

6Z0 J*tZ0ZO20Z 

630 FOP I"0 TO 315 STEP 4 

640 n!I«BUJ D'l-J 

630 NEXT 

660 LINK GG0 

670 GOTO* 

1000 PEN CURSOR 

!B10CnOVET C20*Z*E3 5- CC^Z0»E> 

1020 FOR l«l TO 3 

1030 PLOT B--E.1 

1040 PLOT E,Z*<0 

1030 NEXT I 

1TO0 RETURN 

Z0BB PETt PETBD INPUT 

ZB10VDO LINK LL0'U.G<E3 SiR. 

ZBZB RETt FETBD INPUT I DETECT CRSR CTPLS 

Z0309C7SUBV 

EB4B IP G<0 OR G>7 RETURN 
2030 IF 70B0O1W8B** G=G*100 
ZB60 RETURN 
30B0 REn HEnOINC 
3010nCLEnR 0 

HOVE 0,47»DRRU e.41;DKnU 4,41 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 55 



BY TIM JACKSON 
LIFE RUNS ON AN 

ACORN 





ATOM 
IN12K 




3030 flOVE 6'41iUVTM 0*47 

3040 nerve 9*4VVm* 5,«7ipww 12 4? nrrvt 9.4«iDmw 11-44 

TOVC I8.47lpmU 14,47:pPF*l l*.41iOmw 18>41 

rove i«,M-mnu it, 44 

3070 HOVE B.WitWW 1B<33 
3U30 FETUFN 

J B JWUtf g 6?/B;D*"W 62.34:p*flW Z0 ( 34)DP"W Z0..0.DFm 62.6 
3100 P.030 '-*3E THE"- -DJFTOW-'-WV TK" 

3110 r.- s r n ie en " "-to tffi wi e ---«. delete" -cells,-* 

31ZB P. -WD THEN" ' *FW55" ' " TTUWN - ' "TO STfWT" 
31 TO PETUFN 

?1«0JP.«30 ;F0K I»C TO 1B;P. *■ ".NEXT 

S19B PRtNTVSi P TCW-SPwccBm-' - o WCP * 

3160 P .IJWIOT 1 * DBV9M ! I W» W 

3170 PETUPN 

4000fnF*"»7000 I F*W30 : i E»W7Ft 

4010C 

40Z0 LLB 

iB3B J3* •PETlJ sty rmwn 

•B4CWTTT VP WnPHIC3-T0P *H CTWNEP 
4030 GG0 LPP, 

40e* rrn pmisth f*tj 

40^*0 LOR 560! 3TFI F 

4p?0 LDH fTH F*Z 

4070¥N+Z30 IN r-D*23€ IH F»Z 

4 1 00 LP" 7"»1*FP ' 3TB F 

4110 LP" Sm l fFF00'230*l * *TB r+i 

4120 LP" 7TOFFF: 5T" F>Z 

4130 LP* ?PWF00'23e»l I TTH K*3 

4140 LPT 104 

4130 LP* «1 

410B-GS1 PET 

4170 TTW.;PHR;TX*(PW 

4100 J3* GCZ PO NEXT CEN. 

4i?0 PLn;TBx;FUi;Tm* 
4ZB0 pec pi ore p 

4Z10 LP" 570- OTP F; ONE *iG? 

4ZZ0 PET F'Z- PEC F»Z 

4Z70 LP" B60i TTF> P 

4Z4B 1 GG3 

4Z30 TT*;0HE OT1 

4ZC0 PCXJBriT OT4 

4Z70 PEC K*1IDBC K+? 




56 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 





»27B 
•788 

•71 B 
47ZB 
4338 
VM 
4338 

•3TB 
»73B 
•778 
+ 

441B 
44ZB 
4*38 
•MB 
4*38 
4*68 

ffn 

4*38 

4438 
-"^ 

•318 

tan 

4338 
43*8 
4T7T 
*78P 

4788 
*338 

«l 

*«1B 
«6ZB 
4638 
4MB 
4838 



-88" T75I 
CO* *T3 

GGZ 

CBF B3/BE0 GG3 BITTH 
CHP 52 1 BNE GG5 PEBP 

L8fKIE7*Y 

CTTP |tl BEO GG3 3THT LIVE 
OT6 
LP" 38 
TOT 

tTIKKS/TJ 
OT3 

LOB Bl : BFL 

ssb lpb bt p^zts jwffbb'ZW 

?TF, 

LPB K K 
LW BtP*2T3'JWFFBe-*7^8;3TB K*3 
LCI B(D+Z77*!«FF;STH F.*Z 

U7K in 

ssz lot »«r 
593 JSP TBI 
OCT) CFT tZElJ BNE 333 
3EC: LP" Ki SBC BZB; 3TB K 
BC3 334 1 PEC K*U SEC 
734 LPB K*ZiSBC BZB'STB K+Z 
BC3 333: PEC K*3 
33? PE* 1 BFL 332 

pts 

331 LPPStO.Ti BCD S3B 
3TT KM 

cp* nro 337 

TTBISEX'SBOTZl ITBT1 J5 F- 53 8 
337 LPT K*« i CFTBZ1 1 BEU3S5 i OCT 

J3B TOJ3UNT;CFTB«fl>BE0331B 
737 THTJJ3B 551 J ' DRY 
331B CFKB13'BE11 331 1 
TTBJCLC;BPCRl?'TBTf J5R 33B 
3311 lpt r*«;BT3 
373 LP" KW'CBPirZl :BEB331Z 

JSP 3313 

33 1Z IWYiJSP 3313 
LOW F!*4 ; LHPIMB | BCD 330 

IHYiJSP 3313 



*T«8>3313 LPmK*ZJ-TJCLCJ'«»CBl 3TmK*Z).TJrr5 
4^?0] PET URN 

6CBBlOT3UBntr.W3B**" 

bb1b p."twi3 fkogpbb sibulbtes the"' 

bbzb p. -evolution of b colony of cells-- 

6838 p.-dvct 3ucce731ve genefbt ions> ~ ' 

68*8 p. "in b cco f ub mce «th tub" "following fule3."" * 

6838 G03. 1 'G03,B!F. 836' * * " 

6868 F.-B L1VB CELL HILL LIVE IF IT HB3 JU3T Z O ff 3 NEIGHB0UB3" 
6870 P.","*"H0R1Z0NTBLLT- VEBTICBLLT OB" ' -PIBGONBLLY. " 
BBBB P. "WITH OVEB 2 NEIGHBO'-B'E ' IT MILL"' 
6838 F.-PIE FBOH 0VEBCTOWP1N0. "* 

8188 P. "WITH LE33 TBBB Z> IT HILL PIE"* "OF LONELINESS. "' 

cue f.-if bn rnrrr locbtion hbs rarrvn neighbour ■ 

61ZB P."B NEW CELL MILL BBTOW."' 
6178 GC7A"ei'G05UBn.'F.«38 

6148 F." YOU HOST SET UP THE INITIAL" "FBTTEBN OF CELL? 

6138 P. "USING THE-'-pOUBLE-MEBPEO BF FQW K CrS FT THE LEFT OF ■ 

8 108 P. "THE RCTBZffffV TO HOVE" ' "THE CUFSOB ' WHI TE SOUBBEl." - 

617B P." PRESS SHIFT TO BEVB B5E TXg~ ' "DJB3QP BOVEHENT . " ' 

6188 P." P*E33 3FHCEBBB TO OFEBTE OP"' 

6178 F.-PELETE B CELL BT THE CURSOR"' "POSITION. "' 

6288 PETUBH 

r8881F.' «» F*E 7? y W -EB" W TO C0HTINUET1" . LINT8PFE7 PETVPN 
8«WBU00SUB'i;P.838 

7818 FPINT-HHPTT CENBWniON SPEEP U0UL0"*"T0O LKT" 
3B2BVPPINT-TTPE H NJBCEP BETWEfTt 8 'FBSTV-«NP 7 '3L0HJ- 
OT78 INPUT" ■ UNO PFE7J7 PET'JPN-- .«4 
3848 IF LENM11 OTTOV 
3838 I* fRVtn OP n-CBTB GOTOv 
7868 V^m-B38yflB8 
8878 KETUBN 




COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 57 




Entrapment is a deceptively 
simple strategy game which can 
be seen as a struggle for living 
space. 

One of the best two-player 
games around, it requires last 
reflexes, good control and the 
ability to think on the move and 
outwit your opponent. 

Skill determines the outcome, 
yet it can be played and enjoyed 
by a four-year-old, the controls 
are that easy to master and the 
game's objectives so obvious. 

The aim is to move a growing 
life-line into free space on the 
screen. That is space not taken- 
up by your own "tail", your 
opponent's "tail" or the bound- 
aries of the screen. 



As the screen gradually fills, 
so certain areas of it are cut off 
from one or both players. The 
winner is the player who can cut 
his opponent off with the least 
space to play with. And then just 
avoid mistakes until his oppo- 
nent runs out of room and is 
forced to hit an existing line. 

Take care not to reverse direc- 
tion, as this is judged as running 
back into your own "tail". 

The movement instructions are 
included in the table below: 



Movement leit player right player 

UP W P 

RIGHT S ; 

DOWN Z 
LEFT A L 




5 sosubvooo 

14 IHPUtt* 

15 CIS 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




§^:::r::- 

■SBSS**"*'' 

a m omheIo ,!■».«««»• 

sSsss-- 

(,20 SEl^O.V^ 
b 40 60T050 

700 p»WT*tt.»l ««• 

701 



ioo5 as 

,0»5 f*W , 0 EHC109E 10U«" 

1060 hmwow*" 6 WTH M r 

,0,0 M«n-10B8 OF TW B«. 
H00 PMUl . cMf r^cisTS of box-' 

IS?-' 

„B5 P«WSTR1H6«U0. , « > ( , 

„90PHW UP 1 

,200 HH»VM»* 5 

U10 PR1HVH16H1 ^ 
,220 Wl»VLE" 



I* 



1710 PR1K1 . ■ u4 



710 





COMPUTER 8c VIDEO GAMES 59 



THREE 
SINCLAIR 
IK WONDERS 



Many games players find the 
limits imposed by IK of memory 
as a frustration to be borne until 
they have saved up enough 
money to expand their computer. 

Others accept the challenge 
to produce a worthwhile game 
within these restrictions and 
apply themselves via a little lat- 

The first of our IK wonders is 
Android Attack by Michael Km 
caid and David Chapman 

The aim of the game is to 
shoot down as many advancing 
androids as possible before three 
escape your fire- 
One point for each ailing alien 
and once the score gets past 10 
the going gets harder as the 
creatures start from closer-in. 
The game is over when three 
androids have escaped. 

To move your gun, the com- 
mands are: U- to move up; N- to 
move down; F- to fire. 
The variables used are: 
K = Your score 

C = Number of androids that 
have passed you. 
0 = Where android starts across 
the screen 

P = Line where your gun is. 
S = Lino where android is 

printed on. 

V = Movement of your gun. 
T = Count for moving android 
across screen. 

lain McWilltams' Mole game is an 
original test of foresight and dex- 
terity. 

The program simulates a mole 
diving deep into his burrow. 
Unfortunately he is blind and has 
to be guided down using the "N" 
and "M" keys on the Sinclair 
keyboard. 

Projections which have to be 
negotiated, stick out from either 
side of the tunnel and a point is 
scored for each move until the 
poor mole stumbles into a wall. 

For such a simple game it is 
surprisingly addictive- 
List of variables: 
A - FOR NEXT loops and 
position of passage 



eral thinking to come up with 
some of the most imaginative of 
computer games. 

Here we present three such 
games, kindly donated by our 
inspired readers for Sinclair 
ZX81 owners to try out: Android 
Attack, Mole and Catch-a-Bag- 
of-Swag. 



P = Position of mole. 

R = Character at mole s 

position, 
S = Counter of score. 



next 



List of subroutines: 

At line 20 = print out passage. 

At line 24 = check for next posi- 
tion of mole. Print out mole 
Increase score and create 
next position of mole. 

Catch-a-Bag-ot-Swag by Julian 
Downes invites you to catch the 
money as it falls in bags from the 
bank above. 

You have control of a catching 
"bucket" which can move left or 
right, using the "5" and "8" keys. 

The bags are of random value 
and you must catch as many as 
possible to make the "blag" 
worthwhile. Once 15 bags have 
been dropped the game starts 
again. A check is kept of the 
highest score so make sure you 
catch the valuable ones. 
A rundown of the program fol- 
lows: 

10 30 — assign variables — H 
= High score X = catcher posi- 
tion S - Score. 

40 — M counts the number of 
bags dropped 

50-60 — A determines (ran- 
domly) which bag falls B deter- 
mines (randomly) its value 
70 — displays bank 
80-140 — Makes bag fall & 
moves catcher 

160 — Has catcher caught bag? 
170-190 — if "Yes" then adjust 
score 

200-210 — otherwise continue. 
220-250 — Once 15 bags have 
been dropped, check for new 
high-score and adjust if neces- 
sary. Then start again. 



***4 



ANDROID 
ATTACK 



BY MICHAEL KINCAID & DAVID CHAPMAN 



1 LET K = 0 

2 LET C = 0 

3 LET D = 1 

5 LET P = 4 

6 LET S = 4 

20 FOR T - D TO 28 
30 PRINT AT S,T; " ■■- " 
35 PRINT AT P,25; "<*' 
45 LET V = 0 

50 IF INKEY $ = "U" THEN LET V = -4 
60 IF INKEY $ - "N" THEN LET V =4 
65 IF INKEY $ = "F" AND P - S THEN GOTO 200 
70 IF P+V < = 3 THEN LET V ■ 0 
85 PRINT AT P.25; " " 
90 LET P - P+V 
100 NEXT T 

105 LET C = C + l 

106 IF C =3 THEN GOTO 230 

1 10 LET S = INT <RND x4) x4 +4 
120 IFS > «= 16 THEN LET S=4 
130 GOTO 20 
'200 PRINT AT S.T; " 
210 LET K = K + l 
215 IF K> 10 THEN LET D = D +-2 
220 GOTO 110 
230 PRINT "SCORE = **; K 



60 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 





BY IAIN MCWILLIAMS 



2 FOR A = 1 TO 10 

3 PRINT "■ ■" 

4 NEXT A 

5 LET P = 3 

6 LETS =0 

7 LET A = INT (RND* 5+1) 

8 GOSUB 20 

9 GOSUB 24 

10 IF R = 128 THEN GOTO 30 

11 IF RND<-7 THEN GOTO 8 

12 FOR A = 1 TO 4 

13 SCROLL 

14 PRINT AT 9,0; "■ ■" 

15 IF RND -3AND A>1 AND A<4 THEN PRINT AT 

9 P; " H" 

16 GOSUB 24 

17 IF R = 128 THEN GOTO 30 

18 NEXT A 

19 GOTO 7 

20 SCROLL 

21 PRINT AT 9,0; 

22 PRINT AT 9,A; " " 

23 RETURN 

24 PRINT AT 3.P; 

25 LET R = PEEK (PEEK 16398+ * PEEK 16399) 



26 PRINT " +" 



27 LETS =S+1 

28 LET P = P+(INKEY$ 

29 RETURN 

30 PRINT AT 4.P; S 



"M") - (INKEY $ = "N") 






'8" AND Xoll THEN LET X 



10 LET H = 0 

20 LET X = 0 

30 LET S = 0 

40 FOR M = 1 TO 15 

50 LET A - INT (RND • 12) +2 

60 LET B = (INT (RND * 5) * 1 

70 print at i i; iQBBBBBBBBBBBi 

80 FOR Y = 1 TO 9 
90 PRINT AT Y.A; "fl" 

100 IF INKEY $ = "5* AND X<>0 THEN LET X = 

X-l 
110 IF INKEY $ 

X+l 

120 PRINT AT 10.X; " IBI " 
130 PRINT AT Y.A; " " 
140 NEXT Y 

150 PRINT AT 10, A; "B" 
160 IF A <>X+2 THEN GOTO 200 
170 LET S^S+B 
180 PRINT AT 0,2; "SWAG = £"; S 
190 GOTO 210 
200 PRINT AT 10.A; " " 
210 NEXT M 
220 CLS 

230 IF H<S THEN LET H = S 
240 PRINT AT 0, 12; "HI-SWAG = £"; H 
250 GOTO 30 



COMPUTER 8t VIDEO GAMES 61 




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62 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



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COMPUTER 8f VIDEO GAMES 63 



The 

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Software Company 





THIS IS NOT A 
PRACTICE DRILL ! EARTH 
IS BEING INVADED 

ONY0UR TRs80& V^|E 

Galaxy Invasion 




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As you fire your laser at the aliens 
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Exciting use of graphics! Must be seen. 

TRS 80 Level I £f 11 16K Tape 

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Now the amazing ASTEROIDS arcade 
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Your only escape is to destrny them and 
the crafty alien spacecraft' Blast them 
with your laser. Thrust, rotate or hit 
hyperspace to survive' 

TRS 80 Levels I h I1 1 6K Tape 

Video Genie 16K Tape 





Cosmic Fighter 

Your tighter appears below a convoy of 
Aliens! If you destroy them another set 
appears who seem to be slightly cleverer 
than before! Soon your space station 
nears but before you can dock the station 
comes under attack! Survival is up to you 1 
The excitement is just beginning!' 

TRS 80 Levels I h II 16K Tape 

Video Genie 16K Tape 






Dodge the alien Ramships and fire 
missiles to destroy them before they get 
you. The alien Flagship uses his deadly 
laser bolt to transform a Ramship into 
another Flagship or into your ship's 
double. Look out! Destroy your double 
and you could destroy yourself 

TRS80Levell&M16KTape 

Video Genie EG3003 16K Tape 

Robot Attack 



TRS 80 Levels I & II 16 K Tape 
Video Genie 16 K Tape 

The Newest and Most Astounding Arcade 
Game that talks has |ust Reached Planet 
Earth. You can't help yourself You have to 
stop them at all cost Don't let up Written 
especially for high quality graphics you'M 
simply be dazed and excited by the action 




qobbU' 1 man 



Watch out behind vou 1 
As you hurry through 
the maze collecting 
your energy 



modules you score points But don't let the 
Gobblemen catch you. It you are crafty, 
sneek up behind them and neutralise them 
to gain extra points. Just keep a watch 
When they attack you they come in last 
Just don't lose your nerve. 



TRS 80 Levels I 
Video Genie 16 

3-D means thai as you wander thrbugrVthe maz^s and buildings , y\ I 
full screen graphic display constantly shows your position in a 
perspective format as though you were actually therel This "rat's 
eye view adds an entirely new dimension to adventure. 
English language commands can be entered at any time to manipu- 
late your environment. The command sets are extensive and sophisti- 
cated. Dozens of objects are scattered throughout the mazes and 
buildings. You can pick them up, burn them, throw them, etc. You 
may need the sword to fight off an ugly little man. Or a steel rod to 
hold apart crushing walls. Deathmaze 5000 and Labyrinth allow the 
traditional one and two word commands. Asylum incorporates our 
Advanced Language Interpreter (ALI), which allows full sentence 
input. 

yjfij Deathmaze and Labyrinth consist of over 550 locations! 

Asylum tops 1200 locationsl 



& II 16 K Tape 
K Tape 




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iViscounti Ltd.) 01-837 3154 
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EVERY adventure needs a tew 
idiots (sorry, heroes) brave 
enough to test its terrors. So the 
computer must be able to decide 
the player's responses to given 
situations. 

Following the arrays which we 
set up in the last issue, we will 
now make our adventure prog- 
ram recognise and act on the 
player's response. Let us assume 
that this will be in the form of a 
verb followed by a noun. We will 
assign R1S to this and say it is 
"TAKE KNIFE": 

300 FOR I - I TO LEN <R1$) : REM 
set up scan of Rl$ 
310 IF M1D$(R1$,I.1) = " " THEN 
340 : REM find position of space 
320 NEXT : REM space not found 
330 PRINT "REPLY USING TWO 
WORDS" : STOP : REM temp. 

error message 

340 LET R2$ = LEFTs(Rl$,I-D : 
LET R3$ = RIGHTs(Rl$,LEN(Rl$) 

We now have R2 = TAKE and 
R3$ = KNIFE, and must check to 
see if they are valid words — 
and if so, find their numerical 
identities. 

All that we need do is to uni- 
quely identify each word and 
can achieve this by using (say) 
the first three letters of each 
word, to establish strings like: 
LET WIS = "DROTAKKILTUR . . 
: REM drop take kill turn 
LET W2$ = "KNIFISCOWAXE . . 

: REM knife fish cow axe 
we can identify our words so: 
350 LET R4$ = LEFTs(R2$,3): LET 
R5$ = LEFTs(R3$,3) 
360 LET C$ = WIS : LET CCS = 
R4$ : GOSUB 2000 

Line 350 standardises the var- 
iable names for entry into: 
2000 FOR I = 1 TO LEN(CS) 
2010 IF MID$(C$,I,3) = CC$ THEN 
RETURN : REM found it 
2020 NEXT : REM not found — try 
again 

2030 LET I = 0 : RETURN : REM 
not there — set I to zero 

On return from this subroutine 
if I = 0 the word is not valid and 
we can continue: 
370 IF I = 0 THEN PRINT "I 
CANT'; R2$; "SOMETHING" : 
STOP 



Deathmaze 5Q00 is a remarkable 
adventure. It is brilliant! It Is mad- 
dening! That could be why its sequel 
is called "Asylum". 

Author Frank Corr, was an 18- 
year-old Freshman at the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute ot Technology, 
when he wrote Deathmaze, alter 
writing an English Research Paper 
on machine language. 

Deathmaze is displayed graphi- 
cally as a maze in perspective. Only 
forward movement is possible, by 
depressing the "up" arrow key. 
Movement in other directions is 
achieved by turning on the spot, 
using the remaining arrow keys, and 
thence moving forward. 

A "save-game" feature is pro- 
vided, which is just as well since the 
maze is reputed to have 500 ceils 
spread over live levels. I can't verify 
this as I haven't managed to visit 
them all yet! To the side ol the 
graphics is an updated inventory of 
objects and torches carried. 

As you move you will occasionally 
come across a box lying on the floor. 
When over it you may open it and 



take the contents by typing the 
appropriate instruction. 

There is no prompt — but, as il by 
magic, your words appear at the lop 
ol the screen. On hitting enter, the 
response replaces the instruction. 

So what goodies are in the boxes? 
Would you believe a precision 
crafted Irisbee? A mutilated 
sneaker? Hazards include execution 
by invisible guillotine and starvation 
if you have no food when your 
stomach starts grumbling (eating the 
sneaker only gives you heartburn!) 
_ and — "That Room"!! 

"That Room" has a way in — but 
please, please someone out there — 
is there a way out? What is the 
signilicance ol the difference bet- 
ween 317 and 317.2? I have taken to 
listening to the BYRDS (turn turn 
turn) and resorted to Bible reading 
(Ecclesiastes Chapter 3 Verses 1 to 
. .)• 1 have tried reversing and turn- 
ing. 317 - LIE??? Intrigued? Buy It 
and join me later in the Asylum! 
• Deathmaze is available in 16K lor 
the TRS-80 and Video Genie from the 
Essential Software Company but the 
32K Apple version, only, from Med. 
Systems Software in the US. 




However, in this case I = 4 and 
TAKE has been identified. We 
can now re-assign C$ • W2$ and 
CCS = R5$ and go on to find the 
noun in the same way. First 
though, we must remember the 
value of I before it is changed on 
re-entering the subroutine. 
380 LET Kl = I : REM now go on 
to find noun 

As the program builds up, 
inevitably the strings holding 
valid words will lengthen, 
increasing the scan time of the 



FOR-NEXT loop. Can we speed 
things up? Yes — the trick is to 
amend line 2000 thus: 
2000 FOR I = 1 TO LEN(CCS) 
STEP LENtCS) 

Since the words are now m 
three-letter blocks we can step 
by the length of the block and 
reduce the time by 2/3. 

The second trick is really an 
illusion! Place the most fre- 
quently used words at the 
beginning of the string and the 
rarer ones towards the end. 

BX KEITH CAMPBEU 



AATARI 




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66 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



A storeroom which is 13ft square 
has in it three pyramids, all of 
different sizes, built from foot- 
balls each 1 foot 6 inches in 
diameter. 

The pyramids have triangular 
bases (e.g. one on top, three on 
the next layer, six on the next 
and so on). It is noted that the 
number of layers in both the 
smallest and largest pyramids 
together is twice the number of 
layers in the other pyramid. 

Using all of these balls it is 
possible to construct three 
pyramids with square bases, so 
that each pyramid has a differ- 
ent number of layers and is also 
different from the number of 




layers in each of the triangular 
pyramids. 

(Square based pyramids have 
one ball on top, four on the sec- 
ond layer, nine on the next and 
so on.) 

Can you tell me the number of 
layers of balls in each of the 
triangular and the square 
pyramids? 



ACROSS 
1. Health giving computer diet 
such as 19 might bring his 
mentor (2, 5, 3. 1) 

8. "Perfect" as the Blackjack 
program might say at the 
start (5) 

9. Came to the point about 
E.D.P. rate (7) 

U. Micros made of tiny nuts (5, 5) 
12. Unpretentious integer (7, 6) 
14. Thoroughly proficient but 

now obsolete chess computer 

(10) 

17. Printer drive on the farmyard 

(7) 

18. One of the wise men plotted 
on the screen (5) 

19. Mr Chip's favourite computer 

(8. 3) 
DOWN 

2. Sounds like the mistake in ET 
x = 1 at this time of year (4) 

3. Like VIC's screen and 
Joseph's coat (13) 

4. Install a terminal part in the 
future (5) 

5. R2D2 characters! (13) 

6. B.A. or I.B.M. programmed to 
produce a Galaxian missile 
(3, 4) 



a puzzle and set it out as a prog- 
ram. These lend themselves to 
solving by program. If you are 
more literary minded try Nev- 
era's Crossword and see how 
you get on. 



Two bottles of champagne are 
up for grabs on this page every 
month. The first correct answers 
out of the hat for both the Mind 
Routines problem and the 
crossword on 15 January will 
have bottles of champagne 
rushed to them. Ian Pedder's 
Mind Routines problem will test 
both your ability to think through 



Our November Mind Routines 
puzzle proved very hard. Alan 
Green of Reading Road, Win- 
nersby, Wokingham was one of 
the very few who managed to get 
it right. Mr B Green of Anchorage 
Lane, Sprotbrough, Doncaster 
was first out of the hat with a 
correct Nevera Crossword solu- 
tion. 

See page 11 for the solutions to 
the December issue's Nevera 
Crossword and Mind Routines. 




7. Micro in the lost and found 

columns? (7, 3) 
10. Undressed and reduced in 

dimension (10) 
13. Having the will to test a 

Texas program segment (7) 
15. Obey the tennis game 



instructions to start with (5) 
16. Program control structure 
bag (4) 

• For details of Computer & 
Video Games competition rules 
see page 11. ^ 



JfofC&m&t 

____________ ■> foam to turn the board over onto. solder in all the components 

rt — _-i|C This allows for components of before the holders as they are all 

PRIPF Ol 1 nt different depths to be soldered in very close together and can be 

Unii r^J— y at the same time. very fiddly. 



GRIPE of the month goes to all 
those makers who do not supply 
transistor pads with their kits. 
This would do away with all 
those blown transistors I have 
come across — especially in the 
ZX81 — owing to excess heat 
when soldering. 

Although 1 have been critical 
oi the ZX81 in the past I do have 
some good news for those of you 
with problems. It appears that 
Sinclair are prepared to repair, 
free of charge, machines which 
have been opened or even tam- 
pered with, so long as this was 
not the reason for the fault. 

They also have a very good 
spare parts department which I 
have already made use of. I 
made the mistake of packing the 
ZX81 with the power supply, 
which indented and ruined the 
keyboard. Oh well, you live and 
learn. 

Now for a little kit building 
advice. Although, in some kits, 
the components come preformed 
ready for insertion you should 
always have a pair of pointed- 
nose pliers handy, if only to stop 
finger burns. Where there is a 
need to bend up components it 
should be done with the pliers 
between the component and the 
bend. 

If you are not quite accurate at 
first and the component does not 
fit correctly, do not force it in. Try 
again by first squashing the 
bend flat. Do not attempt this too 
many times as the lead will 
eventually weaken and break. A 
drop of solder on the bend, once 
the component is in place will do 
as a bodge if this happens. 

Remember that the lead is 
only held onto the component by 
the moulding. Any undue force 
may break this contact which 
would leave you with an invis- 
ible open circuit. 

A helpful tip when "building 
up" the components in layers on 
the board is to use a piece of 
sticky tape to hold them in. The 
other way is to use a piece of 



This allows for components of 
different depths to be soldered in 
at the same time. 

When it comes to chip holders 
I am bound to complain, not only 
about the kit builders but also to 
the suppliers. So many times 
have I seen holders raised off the 
board, if not at both ends, then at 
least one. This leads to 
increased stress and strain on 
the pins and, with the great 
number of times kit builders' 
heavy hands get to them, even- 
tual fracture. 

Besides this, it is often the 
case that holders are supplied 
which are not, in my view, suit- 
able for the usual punishment. 



solder in all the components 
before the holders as they are all 
very close together and can be 
very fiddly. 

Tangerine have made the 
commendable decision to supply 
most of their expandable system 
in cost-saving kit versions as 
well as pre-assembled. If the 
other boards are of the same 
high standard as the Microtan 65 
there should be no problems. 
Make sure, though, that you 
have made all the links on this 
board as directed. I forgot and it 
took me a while to figure out why 
I could not get it going. 




Generally these are of the open, 
Molex type which are quite suit- 
able for flow-solder, production- 
line assembly but not for kits. I 
prefer to see the totally encapsu- 
lated versions which seem to 
stand up better to the rigours of 
kit building. 



OPEN UP A 
TANGERINE 



One kit that uses this type of 
open socket extensively is the 
Tangerine Microtan 65. The 
board, however, is so well laid 
out that each one should go in 
with no trouble at all. Be sure to 



Tangerine have a very good 
service department which 
accepts problems over the tele- 
phone and is very helpful. There 
is also a Tangerine User Group 
which aims to help the beginner, 
as well as the advanced owner, 
with his or her new machine. 

If a company is prepared to 
offer its products in kit form then 
it should also be prepared to 
answer problems from the 
public. Most do, but it may pay 
in the long run to find out the 
ones who do not and keep away 
from them. On the other hand, 
there may — as in the case of 
Tangerine — be a user group to 
which you can turn, if in diffi- 
culty. 



68 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



THE SHARP MZ-80K 
HAS GOT IT ALL 




r >HARPSHARPSHARHN^ 



STOP PRESS... NOW AVAILABLE 
BASIC COMPILER 



PASC AL (CASSETTE BASED) 
DOUBLE PRECISION DISC BASIC 




Since its introduction the Sharp MZ-80K has proved to be 
one of the most successful and versatile microcomputer 
systems around Sharp now have a comprehensive range ot 
products ready to make the powerful MZ-80K with its 
Printer and Disc Dnves even more adaptable 
Products include: - Universal Interface Card, Machine 
Language and Z-80 Assembler packages, CP/M* plusa 
comprehensive range of software 

• Trade mark of Digital Research Ltd 

GET IT ALL HERE 



You'll find all the help and advice you need about the MZ 80K at your 
Specialist Sharp Dealer in the list betaw 
II there is no dealer in your area, or it you require any further 
information write to • Computer DivisKxrSharp Bertron.es (UK) Ltd . 
Sharp House. Thorp Road. Newton Heath.Manchestcr 




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COMPUTf R * VIDEO GAMES 69 



Sinclair ZX8I Personal Com* 
the heart of a system 
that grows with you. 



1980 saw a genuine breakthrough - 
the Sinclair ZX80, world's first com- 
plete personal computer for under 
£100. Not surprisingly, over 50,000 
were sold. 

In March 1981, the Sinclair lead 
increased dramatically. For just 
£69.95 the Sinclair 2X81 offers even 
more advanced facilities at an even 
lower price. Initially, even we were 
surprised by the demand - over 
50,000 in the first 3 months! 

Today, the Sinclair ZX81 is the 
heart of a computer system. You can 
add 16-times more memory with the 
ZX RAM pack. The ZX Printer offers 
an unbeatable combination of 
performance and price. And the ZX 
Software library is growing every day. 

Lower price: higher capability 

With the ZX81, it's still very simple to 
teach yourself computing, but the 
ZX81 packs even greater working 
capability than the ZX80. 

1 1 uses the sam e micro-processor, 
but incorporates a new, more power- 
ful 8K BASIC ROM - the 'trained 
intelligence' of the computer. This 
chip works in decimals, handles logs 
and trig, allows you to plot graphs, 
and builds up animated displays. 

And the ZX81 incorporates other 
operation refinements - the facility 
to load and save named programs 
on cassette, for example, and to 
drive the new ZX Printer. 



Kit: 
£49. 



95 




i 




BASIC manual 



Every ZX81 comes with a comprehensive, specially written 
manual - a complete course in BASIC programming, from 
first pnnciptes to complei programs 



Higher specification, lower price — 
how's it done? 

Quite simply, by design. The ZX80 
reduced the chips in a working 
computer from 40 or so, to 21. The 
ZX81 reduces the 21 to 4! 

The secret lies in a totally new 
master chip. Designed by Sinclair 
and custom-built in Britain, this 
unique chip replaces 18 chips from 
theZX80! 

New, improved specification 

• Z80A micro-processor - new 
faster version of the famous Z80 
chip, widely recognised as the best 
ever made. 

• Unique 'one-touch* key word 
entry: the ZX81 eliminates a great 
deal of tiresome typing. Key words 
(RUN, LIST. PRINT, etc.) have their 
own single-key entry. 

• Unique syntax-check and report 
codes identify programming errors 
immediately. 

• Full range of mathematical and 
scientific functions accurate to eight 
decimal places. 

• Graph-drawing and animated- 
display facilities. 

• Multi-dimensional string and 
numerical arrays. 

• Up to 26 FOR/NEXT loops. 

• Randomise function - useful for 
games as well as serious applications. 

• Cassette LOAD and SAVE with 
named programs. 

• 1K-byte RAM expandable to 16K 
bytes with Sinclair RAM pack. 

• Able to drive the new Sinclair 
printer. 

• Advanced 4-chip design: micro- 
processor, ROM. RAM, plus master 
chip - unique, custom-built chip 
replacing 18 ZX80 chips. 




Built: 




Kit or built - it's up to you! 

You'll be surprised how easy the 
ZX81 kit is to build: just four chips to 
assemble (plus, of course the other 
discrete components) - a few hours' 
work with a fine-tipped soldering iron. 
And you may already have a suitable 
mains adaptor - 600 mA at 9 V DC 
nominal unregulated (supplied with 
built version). 

Kit and built versions come com- 
plete with all leads to connect to 
your TV (colour or black and white) 
and cassette recorder 




■ '■j-ii PQK.E 
POKE 
J906 LET 



BET UK 
996S REM F 




16K-byte RAM 
pock for massive 
add-on memory. 

Designed as a c° m P! ete ™ d "' e B t0 
fit your Sinclair ZX80 or ZX81 the 
RAM pack simply plugs into .the 
existing expansion port at the rear 
of the computer to multiply your 

data/program storage by 16 

Use it for long and complex 
programs or as a personal database. 
Yet it costs as little as half the price 

of competitive additional memory. 
With the RAM pack, you can 

also run some of the more sophisti- 
cated ZX Software - the Business & 
Household management systems 
for example. 



Available now- 
the IX Printer 
for only £49.* 

Designed exclusively for use -with 
the ZX81 (and ZX80 with QK BASIC 
ROM), the printer offers full alpha - 
numerics and highly sophisticated 

9ra A special feature is COPY which 
prints out exactly what is on the 
whole TV screen without the need 
for further intrusions. 



At last you can have a hard copy 
of your program listings -particularly 
useful when writing or editing 

Pf0 Andof course you can print out 
your results for permanent records 
or sending to a friend. 

Printing speed is 50 characters 
per second, with 32 characters per 
line and 9 lines per vertica inch_ 

The ZX Printer connects to the rear 
of your computer - using a stacteble 
connector so you can plug in a RAM 
pack as well. A roll of paper (65 ft 
long x 4 in wide) is supplied, along 
with full instructions. 



7Yfl1 l^equeTpostal order Access. 

How to order your »81 Barclaycard orTrustcard. 

BY PHONE - Access, Barclaycaro or □ ■ * _ ge a „ QW up l0 

Trustcard holders can call ^ Q d for de livery. And there's a 

01-200 0200 for personal attent.on £ days^o^ ^ option. We want 
24 hours a day, every day satisfied beyond doubt - 




_ iinclsii- 

ZX8I 

6 Kings Parade. Cambridge, Cambe. CB2 1SN. 
Tel: (0276) 66104 4 21282. 



T7s 1 nc.. 1 rR«a.r C hUd.FRE E P0ST7,Cambridg..CB2lVY. 
Qty Item 



liSclairZXSl Personal Comp^eTw^Pnce.nc^udes 
ZXB BASIC manual, e^udesj^nsjda^L__^^ 
ReadvasIembTed Sinclair ZX81 Personal Compute is) 

1RK -BYTE RAM pack. 



Code 



12 



11 



Sinclair ZX Printer 



6K BASIC ROMjo II1ZX80 



Post and Packing 



10 
18 



Item price 
C 



Total 
£ 



4995 



69.95 



27 



17 



8.95 



49 95 



49 M 



19.95 



2-95 



□ please tick it you require a VAT receipt t J?™c * 

•Please delete' complete as ■ppheaWe I I 



Please pfM 



Name; Mr/Mrs/Miss 
Address: I — I — I — L 



Mill 1 " 1 



J I I M ' i 



I ) I I I 1 1 1 1 



FREEPOST - no stamp needed. 



CVOI 




KORCHNOI 
GIVES HIS 
CHESS VOTE 

The world's No. 2 chess master. 
Viktor Korchnoi has put his name 
to an electronic chess game 
which is on show (or the first 
time at the Earls Court Toy Trade 
Fair. 

The player who reached the 
final of the World Chess Tourna- 
ment on the last two occasions 
has endorsed one of the newest 
chess games around. The game, 
the Westrak CC3, is a sophisti- 
cated electronic chess game 
which has several improvements 
on the first version of this series. 

There are now 25 standard 
random opening moves, you can 
alter your strategy of play or 
rectify mistakes by making use of 
a special facility, which allows 
you to have up to three full 
moves backwards and three full 
moves forward. 

The response time of the 
machine's moves have been cut. 
Giving a response, on skill level 
one, straight away, on level two, 
in 16 seconds, and up to 28 
minutes on the top level. 

During the game the LEDs 
light up to reveal the computer's 
thinking on its next move. You 
have an advantage over the com- 
puter because you can step in 
and slop the game at any time by 
using the halt key. 

One of the nicest things about 
the Westrak CC3 is its price. It 
will cost between the £150 and 
£160 mark — very competitive. 

AN ALIEN IN 
THE HAND . . . 

The heavens are filled with fast- 
flying alien creatures and enemy 
saucers raining relentlessly 
down on your home base in the 
Galaxy 10,000 hand-held elec- 
tronic game. 

Your task is to leap to the 
defence of your people. Specially 
selected for the job it is up to 
you to shoot down the race 
against you. With a swift deft- 
ness of hand you must move the 
firing base across the LCD. 
screen to avoid the laser shots 
from the attacking force. 

Due out in the shops in the 
next couple of months Galaxy 
10,000 carries a price tag of 
£28.95. U.K. distributors Compu- 
ter Games claims that this new 
toy will give hours of compelling 
entertainment, justifying the 
price. 



CHRISTMAS 




TOY TRENDS 



The British toy industry is quickly off the mark after Christmas, 
planning its new year at the toy and hobby fairs of January. 

These shows are aimed at the trade and give manufacturers a 
chance to enlist distributor and retailer support for the toys and 
games which children will be clamouring for next Christmas. 

The computerised and electronic toys field is a competitive 
one and cloaked in secrecy but COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES is 
unwrapping a few of the toys early to show you what's in store. 

The hand-held games will continue to be popular in 1982. 
mirroring the best arcade games and a lot of emphasis is being 
placed on small electronic games which can be used to keep 
children amused while travelling. Following the cinema trend, 
the games industry is indulging in fantasy themes and these will 
start to take over from the present rash of space games. 

Chess and sophisticated logic games will be aimed at the 
adult gamesters and the computerised chess field promises to 
become especially competitive. 

Some of the toys mentioned below will be available in stores 
from January but in many cases, stocks will not reach the shops 
until the middle of the year at least. 

Our preview of the toy fair will give you an idea of how the 
toy and games industry is approaching the coming year and 
what to look out for when the time comes to fill the Christmas 
1982 stocking. 





ESCAPE THE 

RAVENOUS 

GHOULS 

Keep those ghouls at bay when 
they chase you through a difficult 
maze, eager to devour you at 
the first chance. 

Dart off down the tunnels of a 
complex ma/e, eating up the dots 
covering the path as you go. 
PacMan 2 is a new hand held 
toy on show for the first time at 
Earls Court British Toy and 
Hobby Fair Billed as a "third 
generation" electronic toy it is 
one of the first hand-held ver- 
sions of the popular arcade game 
Puckman. 

PacMan 2 is rectangular in 
shape with an oblong LCD. 
screen on the uppermost face of 
the toy It's for either one or two 
players, the controls for each 
being at the two ends of the 
screen. 

The player controls the eater 
— usually referred to as the 
pacman or munchman - by using 
the four directional keys so that 
you can move him up, down or to 
the left and right. 

You have to keep concentrat 
ing to spot the whereabouts of 
the ghosts and make sure you 
don't get your pacman locked in a 
dead end section of the maze, or 
surrounded inescapably by his 
pursuers. 

In the four corners of the 
screen are four energy posts 
which enable the pacman to eat 
his pursuers and score bonus 
points. 

An added feature of PacMan 2 
which sticks as truly as possible 
to the arcade version, are the 
two tunnels on each side ol the 
ma/e. 

PacMan 2 is made by Entex 
but distributed by Leicestershire 
based A.A. Hales It will be in the 
shops later in the year selling for 
about £30 but could be as much 
as £35 depending on the shop 
manager's discretion. 



CHALLENGE TO 
AN EASTERN 
TUSSLE 

A hardened electronic eastern 
gentleman will challenge you to a 
tussle in one of the most original 
new games planned for 1982. 

The game cashes in on the 
current martial arts boom which 
is filling gymnasiums up and 
down the country with grunting 
white-robed practitioners of the 
new self defence disciplines. 

Called Blackbelt, it consists of 
a three dimensional action man in 
his judo gear, mounted on a plas- 
tic base. He challenges the 
player to fight him by making the 
appropriate limb whip into action. 

On each of the Blackbelt's 
lightning limbs is an LED. light. 
When one of those flashes on it 
means that part of the body is 
about to strike a blow. By pres- 
sing the right button you must 
hit back with the correct leg, arm 
or foot You'll also hear the devil- 
ish laugh of Blackbelt when the 
lights go on, warning you of his 
intentions. 

There are three skill levels tor 
you to progress to when you 
become an expert in this form of 
martial art. The faster you retali- 
ate with Blackbelt's flashing 
arms and legs, the harder the 
game gets - as the lights on the 
limbs speed up. 

The in-built electronic 
scoreboard notes the player's 
score after each game. Each 



game lasts one minute, but the 
quicker you can move the man's 
limbs, the more blows will be 
packed into that time. I* you are 
not sure of your score after play- 
ing a game and the light has gone 
out. wiggle one of the parts of 
the body and the score will flash 
up again. Top score is 200 points. 

Blackbelt is iust one of the 
new range of electronic toys 
brought out for 1982 by Oxford- 
shire based Action Games and 
Toys. Its retail price is listed at 
£10 making it very affordable. 



PASS THE TIME 
AN OCTOPUS 

A small but compulsive set of 
games is bound to capture 
attention, not only at this year s 
toy fair but for the months to 

come. 

These compulsive items come 
in the Game and Watch series — 
a range of pocketwatches which 
double up as electronic games. 
The new ones include titles like 
Chef. Octopus. Popeye. Mickey 
Mouse, and Parachute. 

In Chef, for instance, the idea 
of the game is to catch flying 
missiles in the shape of food or 
kitchen utensils which seem to 
be aHected by dangerous pol- 
tergeists. You operate the chef 
using a control button at the side 
of the unit and make him run 
across the screen catching 
objects which are whizzing 
through the air. 





If you find you can notch up a 
high score on the first level of 
play, progress to the higher level. 
All the games have two skill 
levels and store the highest 
score in the memory cells. 

In Octopus, the scene is set on 
the sandy bottom of an ocean. 
The player operates a diver who 
is attached to a small boat float- 
ing on the water's surface. It is 
his job to recover pieces of 
treasure which are sunk tantalis- 
ingly in the sand a good walk 
away. But beware the Octopus. 

Being more sophisticated than 
the original versions of Game and 
Watch these new ones are more 
expensive at £22.95. 



score aner eaui ya.no. l«v — »- ■-_n_ n. 

MORE GAMES TO WATCH OUT FOR 

IVIUI1L. W t (hD whnlp the oames have a "war" themi 



Watch the hours while away on 
ur wrist and play an electronic 
at the same time. 

type of watch will be in 
shops this year with a practi- 
cal and entertaining concept 
involving a simple but compulsive 
game. These watches look like 
ordinary digital ones but the fig- 
ures are displayed on the LCD. 
screen at the very top. taking up 




about one quarter of the whole 

face. . , ,„ 

The rest of the face is filled 

with a variety of LCD. symbols 
which make up one of four differ- 
ent games, Firing Squad, Alien 
Assault, Missile Strike and Blast 
Away. 

On the face of the watch are 
two buttons which the player 
uses to control the games. All 




the games have a "war" theme 
and involve darting from one side 
of the screen to the other, avoid- 
ing well-aimed bullets, firing roc- 
kets to wipe out the enemy crea- 
tures, blasting missiles from 
enemy craft and engaging m bat- 
tle with tank squadrons. 

An LCD. indicator on the front 
of the watch-face keeps track of 
the score. Press a button and 
you can hear the watch bleep 
when you bombard the enemy 
with your missiles. The watch's 
power supply comes from tiny 
batteries used in ordinary digital 
watches and these are included 

in the price. ■ 

The housing for the watch face 
is made of black plastic which 
should withstand the odd heavy 
knock. Game-Time watches are 
made in the U.S. and are being 
distributed through Woodford- 
based Computer Games. The 



PICK OF THE 
PUCKMEN? 

Following up the Puckman craze 
in the arcades last year are a 
handful of hand-held versions. 

You will be able to carry your 
machine around with you to per- 
feet your technique at any time 
Adam Imports' Munchman, is a 
typical example. The object is to 
score as many points as you can 
by manoeuvring a man around 
the paths of a maze. As long as 
he keeps eating the dots of the 
maze the man's energy is kept 
charged. The chip controlled 
monsters on the man's trail can 
digest him, if he is caught. 

Munchman features multi- 
coloured LCD. displays showing 
the monsters, the man, the dots 
and the labyrinths of the maze 
The points system works on the 
number of dots chewed up and 
bonus points tor any monsters 
tint you manage to gobble up. 

One of several hand-held ver- 
sions of Puckman to be stocked 
on shop shelves this year, 
Munchman will retail for £25.95. 

Computer Games has also 
brought out a version of this 
game. Called Puck Monster, it is 
more or less the same game with 
a different title. The major differ- 
ence between the toys is m 
price. Computer Games toy will 
sell for £28.95. 

The third is by A. A. Hales and 
is dealt with above. Three ver- 
sions of Puckman are now out 
because the manufacturers anti- 
cipate demand for such a hand- 
held toy will be very large, but 
which is the best of the bunch 



^ted^r them is set at can only be ,udged ,n the fullness 
£29.95. of lime - 





COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



73 



pw 



GO TO WW" 
YOUR BUGS 

There is a limit to how much 
anyone can enjoy tracking down 
the programming errors that 
inhabit newly keyed-in crea- 
tions. 

It is possible to write programs 
that run correctly the first time, 
but except lor the shortest and 
simplest programs there are 
nearly always some errors. 
Locating and correcting errors 
can be a time consuming process 
and is best approached sys- 
tematically. 

Copying and typing errors are 
easy to make, and much time 
and trouble can be saved by 
carefully checking the program 
listing on the screen (or hard 
copy if you have a printer) 
against the source from which it 
was copied. Many copying errors 
will produce an error message 
when the program is run, but 
this is not an infallible means of 
finding all such errors. 

A large and complex program 
may include sections which are 
rarely executed and typing mis- 
takes in these sections may not 
show up until the program has 
been in use for some time. 

There are some common errors 
in copying that quite often do not 
lead to the system producing an 
error message but cause the 
program to give the wrong ans- 
wers. These errors include the 
omission of a line, or a statement 
in a multi-statement line, and 
mistakes in copying variable 
names. Confusion between the 
numerals 0, 1, 2 and the letters 
O, I, Z is particularly common, 
and sometimes occurs in books 
and magazines when a program 
has been typeset instead of 
reproduced photographically 
from a printout. A simple exam- 
ple is LET X = BI + AI instead of 
LET X - Bl 4- Al. Basic will find 
nothing wrong with this, but the 
program will not give the right 
answer. 




BUGS WITH 
WRONG MINERS 

Another type of error which 
produces the wrong answers 
without giving an error message 
is due to misunderstanding the 
way your system evaluates com- 
plex expressions. For example, 
how are: 

LET X = A/B # C 
LET Y - A/B/C 
LET Z = A*B**C 
evaluated? If you are not sure 
how the computer will treat an 
expression you can write a short 
program to test it. However, it is 
safer to insert brackets, although 
they may be unnecessary, or to 
break up the expression into a 
series of simpler expressions, to 
ensure that it is evaluated in the 
way you intended. This is par- 
ticularly advisable if the pro- 
gram is to be used by other people 
or transferred to a different 
machine. 

EKECiirarc 

BUGS 

Errors which cause program 
execution to stop, include func- 
tion arguments and array indi- 
ces out of bounds (e.g. attempt- 
ing to divide by zero, or access 
the 101st element of an array 
which has been dimensioned to 
100). 

Execution errors may be due to 
mistakes of the kind discussed 
above, but more often they are 
caused by errors in the program 
logic, particularly where the 
programmer has neglected to 
allow for special cases. 

The cause of this type of error 



may not be immediately obvi- 
ous; the error message will give 
the line number where program 
execution stopped but the ulti- 
mate cause of the error may be in 
a completely different part of the 
program. 

If you have execution errors or 
wrong answers it is best to 
review the whole program, pay- 
ing particular attention to the 
initialisation of variables and 
the destination of GOTO state- 
ments. Most versions of Basic 
initialise variables and array 
elements to zero, and it is poss- 
ible for a section of a program to 
work correctly the first time 
around but give the wrong ans- 
wer later on. For example: 
1000 FOR I = 1 TON 
1010 LET S = S + A(I) 
1020 NEXT I 
1030 RETURN 

If the program has not previ- 
ously used the variable S this 
subroutine will return with S 
equal to the sum of A(I) to A(N) 
but afterwards it will start with 
the value left in S and add on to 
this. 

You should also look for the 
converse of this type of error, 
where initialisation is performed 
correctly at the beginning but is 
repeated at a later stage when it 
is not required. 

You also need to be careful 
with the condition in IF... 
THEN . . . statements. It is usu- 
ally straightforward to decide 
whether to have; IF A < B rather 
than IF A <= B, but in more 
complicated cases, where A and 
B are expressions, or where 
there is a sequence of IF ... 
THEN . . . statements it can be 
difficult to get it right. Any com- 
plicated tests should be worked 
out carefully when designing the 
program and if the resulting 
code does not work properly it is 



usually auickf 



art again. 



a BUG IN K«f 
ARITHMETIC 

The accuracy of the arithmetic 
performed by Basic is a frequent 
source of bugs and it is difficult 
to find why a program is going 
wrong unless you know the 
reason for the inaccuracy. 
Although numbers are entered in 



74 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



decimal. Basic converts them to 
binary for internal storage and 
calculation and converts back 
trom binary to decimal to print 
out the answers. Very tew deci- 
mal fractions can be converted 
exactly to a binary fraction and 
two binary fractions which, in 
the computer's internal rep- 
resentation, differ by a very 
small amount, may print out as 
exactly the same decimal 
number. 

If your program is going wrong 
on the statement IF A = 0 
THEN . . . you may find that when 
you insert the statement PRINT 
"A = "; A immediately before this 
test that the machine gives A = 
0. However, if you ask the 
machine to print A*( 10**10) you 
will probably get a non-zero 
answer. 

These errors in conversion 
between binary and decimal can 
produce some very odd results. 
For example, on the ZX81 the 
command PRINT .25 — &ives the 
answer 0. while PRINT i — .25 
gives 1.1641532E-10. The ZX81 
calculates i by division and gets 
the answer exactly right, but 
when converting .25 into binary 
the result comes out 1/2**33 
short of the exact answer, and by 
some peculiarity in the subtrac- 
tion routine, does not give con- 
sistent results. 

There is usually no problem 
with integer calculations, but 
with decimal calculations 
you cannot rely on the 
computer producing 
exactly the same 
answer you 
would get by 
doing it with 



pencil and paper. You should 
allow for small errors by testing 
for two numbers being suffi- 
ciently close, rather than testing 
for equality. For example, 
instead of IF A=B THEN ... you 
should put something like IF 
ABS(A-B) 1B5 THEN. . . 

Decimal/binary conversion 
errors can also cause problems 
in FOR . . . NEXT loops with a 
fractional step. The two follow- 
ing programs demonstrate what 
can happen: 

10 LET X - 0 

20 FOR I = 0 TO 10 STEP 0.01 
30 PRINT I, X 
40 LET X = X + 1 
50 NEXT I 

10 LET X = 0 

20 FOR I =0TO 100 STEP 0.1 
30 PRINT. I, X 
40 LET X = X + 1 
50 NEXT I 

I tested these on two different 
machines and found that in the 
first case the last values printed 
were 9.99013, 999, and 9.9900002. 
999. while in the second case the 

last values 
printed were 
99.9991, 
1000 and 
99.99996, 1000. 
The reason 
the loop 
body is 





performed a different number of 
times in the two cases lies in the . 
way Basic executes the NEXT 
statement. When NEXT I is 
encountered Basic adds the step 
to I to get the new value of 1 and 
compares this to the upper limit. 
If the new value of I is less than 
or equal to the upper limit the 
loop body is performed again; 
Basic will not exit the loop until 
the new value of I is greater than 
the upper limit. 

When conversion or rounding 
errors make the value of 1 a little 
greater than it should be, Basic 
may exit the loop prematurely. 

A useful method for tracing 
bugs is to insert extra PRINT 
statements into the program, to 
give the values of variables at 
points where you suspect the 
program is going wrong. In 
many cases this will show 
immediately why the program is 
going wrong. 

Where the bug is particularly 
obscure you may have to use this 
method to trace the operation of 
the entire program. There are 
debugging packages available 
for some microcomputers, for 
example the Pet Toolkit, which 
can be very useful for debugging 
large programs. The routines 
available include TRACE, which 
displays the line number cur- 
rently being executed, and 
DUMP, which prints out the 
values of selected variables 
every time they are used. 

FLUSH TWMWJJ 
OF « SYSttM 

System bugs often receive little 
publicity. There is an arith- 
metic bug in the ZX81 which 
results in SQR (.25) being printed 
as 1.3591409 (although SQR (1/4) 
comes out correctly). I have seen 
this mentioned in only three 
magazines, one of them being a 
specialist ZX80/81 publication. If 
you have a ZX81 with this bug 
you can obtain a corrected ROM 
by writing to Sinclair Research. 

Another recently discovered 
bug occurs in many versions of 
Microsoft Basic, resulting in the 
incorrect handling of string 
assignments of the form LET AS 
= AS + BS + CS when there is 
very little free memory avail- 
able. 

COMPUTER 8t VIDEO GAMES 75 



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76 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



IN THE sleazy streets of Lost 
Vagueness the traveller is sub- 
jected to the worst in vice and 
filth in the ionn oi sex, drugs and 
rock 'n' roil. A 
nearest thing to wizardry 
this adventure game is a 



mushroom which sends 



in 

magic 

vision haywire ana rums 
:in into a psychedelic 

haze oi pretty colours. 

So It porn Adventure is delight* 

amy in theme throuqii , If you 

r. .morously entertaining loo. 

The purp^^^ffganie is to 
seduce thrt m 
It was like a dream. I u v *e to 
md myseli in 'he year 2000 A.D. 
:n a wicked vorld in wh ch the 
kies had turned green from 
: lutonium pollution. I ; ted to 
go on holiday in a notorious 
.ambling town where the only 
things people are interested in 
;re drink, women and money. 
Trrrs^l^miy a game though and 
you don't get "hands-on" experi- 
ence yourself. You operate a 
puppet which becomes your eyes 
and ears. 

With $1,000 in my pocket I set 
off on my quest for debauchery, 
but $1,000 is not a lot when you 
want to fling it round on drinks, 
gambling and sex. In a dimly-lit. 
ill-furnished bar, I came across 
my first barrier to "sex-cess". A 
closed curtain was in the way 
and only after guessing the 
password could I walk through 
the curtain to discover what 
fruits lay behind. 

Tamely I tried classic words 
like "abracadabra". When that 
got me nowhere I ventured on to 
more imaginative words like 
"sex", "booze", "women", "per- 
version" (I won't ruin it by telling 
you what the password actually 
was). After exhausting a list as 
long as my arm, frustration had 
set in and I needed to feel a shot 
of whisky coursing through my 
veins. But $100 a go ... oh it's a 
sign of the times. 

I took a break to gather my 
thoughts, and then started inves- 
tigating the area. So far the only 
human I had crossed paths with 
was the degenerate barman, 
never mind a lady of easy virtue. 

The whisky had gone straight 
to my bladder so I took a trip to 
the bathroom. Filth lay there too. 
The toilet hadn't been flushed for 
months. The computer was 
— it stank. On the walls were 
scrawled feet of seedy graffiti. 



like: "Computer freaks peek 
before they poke". 

T he key to the gameisiiie 
amount oi money you have on 
you. It's vital loi oribing people 
(like the pimp in ihe bar's back 
room who want $2,000 bef> 
yon ciin go upstairs to investi- 
ga:> further), entry to the disco (a 
perfect place to \ <ck up a girl), 
buying drinks and betting in the 
casino. 

run out oi money, the 
are that you w^^^ft 
unstuck and 1 ■>? unable to pro- 
ceed. The way to build up your 
cash supply is ta try your hand in 
the casino. ^^^fl 

You can eith> r play on the slot 
; . ; nines or at blackjack but the 
bets are fixed at $100 a throw so 
it's too easy tc -vhittle away 
cash. Very easy for me anyway 
— that's v I made my lirst 

mistake I lost a^^^*Tuu0 on 
blackjack but being an optimist I 
carried on playing. 

Luck was on my side, or so I 
thought at first, and I found a 
passcard which got me into the 
disco. Girls galore were milling 
around daubed in "Californian 
sun tans" and little else. Gambl- 
ing is thirsty work so I focused on 
the bar — this is an expensive 
joint. $100 for a bottle of wine. At 
last I'd found a girl, and after a 
quick boogie with a blonde on 
the dance floor I moved in and 
kissed her. The computer 
bleeped loudly and up on the 
screen flashed "Oh, don't 
that, it gets me excited." 

She rebuffed my amorous 
advances but not to be deterred, 
I stumbled back into the casino 
and into the hotel lobby where a 
voluptuous blonde sat invitingly 
behind the desk. No luck with 
her either, she was too busy 
working despite the place being 
devoid of people. 

I blundered into a 
garden where I 
found a tasty looking 
mushroom, so feel- 
ing a bit peckish I 
ate it, I've heard 
that mushrooms 
have magic powers 
but this one 



beamed me into another place — 
still penniless. 

There are three alternc - 

you run out of money. Go to Hell 

and the game ends. B> i<-:.- 
ported back to life unh 

Stay and try again in th* game, 
though without any 
pointless.! 

The aims and foimat of the 
game are reminiscent : 
adventures but the frustrations 
perhaps a HttT^E^r ore intense . 
There is no graphical picture on 
the scnjen. just wntten desc 
tions of what confronts the 
play' i There is a nice line i 
cheeky replies to unlikely, 
soni- ;n;ies, downright unsoci< 
requ'v: 

On r; ssing a girl it issued 
series : frantic ble- ps and sta 
filled the screen — ii : seductl 
had taken place it •.«.•• M p- 

ably have exploded! But obvi- 
ously my sex counted against me 
and I found no women willing to 
respond to my charms. 

I was disappointed not to suc- 
cessfully seduce any women, 
mainly because I was intrigued 
(and still am) to find out just how 
the computer would react. If any 
of you know the truth I am wait- 
ing eagerly to hear it. 

UK suppliers of Softporn are 
SBD Software in Richmond. It 
runs on a 48K Apple and costs 
£17.95 — far cheaper than a real 
night in "Sin City". 




TV GAMES CENTRES TVGAMESCEM1 HbS I V UAiyit&l 




WIGGLING 
GOOD FUN 



If you have a phobia about things 
which wriggle and grow, you'll 
wan! lo stay well away from the 
screen when Snafu the snake 
game is being played. 

The two snakes in the latest 
cartridge for the Intellivision 
home games centre, are not 
poisonous, they're the constrict 
mg variety. Their aim is to choke 
the life out of one-another by 
cutting down the living space in 
their two-dimensional world. 

Take control of one snake and 
try to outwit your opponent as 
both creatures grow to gradually 
fill and cut-off areas of the 
screen. 

It requires quick wits and 
some close control lo succeed in 
out-manoeuvering the oppo- 
nent's snake, forcing him to dou- 
ble back on himself, or maybe 
crash into the wails of the "pit", 
or his own bodily remains. 

For sheer fast strategy it is a 
difficult game to beat. Keep one 
eye on your opponent's snake to 
see if he intends to cut you off 
from the bulk of the pit but make 
sure that your attention does not 
wander to the extent that you 
end up crashing yourself. 

The game is marvellous proof 
that on computers simple ideas 
often work best. 

Already a popular cartridge on 
other games centres, the Intel- 
livision version costs £18 95 and 
is available from north London- 
based distributors. ACE. 




MIND BINDING 
TEST OF LOGIC 



TREASURE HUNT 



Treasure Hunt is a mind-bending 
game to test your memory and 
logic and stretch both to the 

limit. 

For the Database TV games 
centre, the first version of the 
memory game comprises a matrix 
of blank squares displayed on the 
screen. This game is called "Flag 
Catcher" and you have to inter- 
rogate your own squares to dis- 
cover where a flag has been 
hoisted 

The second game on the car- 



tridge has you matching up pairs 
of coloured squares which 
appear on the screen, by trial, 
error and memory. Treasure Hunt 
will keep you deep in thought 
and can be obtained from Data 
base suppliers for £14, or direct 
from Hertfordshire based man- 
ufacturers Voltmace. 
Lovers of the game of Othello 

will be pleased to find a version 
for Database. This new cartridge 
has |ust been added to the range, 
available for this machine and is 
known as Box Clever, 

But only the name has been 
changed to protect the merce- 
nary and this version remains 
true to the popular board game. 

The object of this tactical 
counter struggle is turn most of 
the board into your own colour 
by capturing your opponent's 
counters between two of your 
own 

A computer is suited to the 
game as it will not miss any 
captures during the turning 
sequence and can play a very 
reasonable standard of Othello. 
The idea is to provide an elec- 
tronic opponent when no human 
one exists, but it is possible to 
play against your friends on the 
televison. The price is £14. 



SURVIVAL IN 
SPACE 



SATELLITE ATTACK 



A lone spaceship in the outer 
depths of the galaxy is making a 
brave bid for survival in a heavy 
meteorite storm. 

You control the spacecruiser 
on its |ourney through space, fir- 
ing lasers at the asteroids to split 
them up into, just as harmful but 
rather smaller, rocks And ulti- 
mately these can be obliterated 



THE ONE THAT WILL 
ALWAYS GET AWAY 





Jaws has nothing on the monster 
that lurks just below the surface 
of the Activision Fishing pond. 

But he is not a man eater — 
his voracious appetite extends 
only so far as thwarting the two 
keen anglers from reaping too 
swift a harvest from the pond. 

The two competing fishermen 
face each other over a deep 
stretch of blue water, which is 
alive with plump fish patrolling 
various depths. 

Each angler has half the pond 
to call his own and into this he 
casts his line, up to halfway 
across but as deep as he likes. 

The aim is to dangle the end ol 
the line at the same depth as the 
eye-sockets of the fish and if the 
Jkpontrary creatures swims past, 
| then the hook will bite. 

The fish swim frantically back 
E and forth in a fruitless effort to 
i escape the line, but their thrash- 
ings do attract Jaws. The shark 



swims back and forth in a seem- 
ingly random pattern just below 
the surface gobbling up any fish 
he passes through. 

He can change speed and 
direction very suddenly to thwart 
even the most alert angler and 
down the catch. 

Fish near the surface are 
worth two points, those from the 
very deepest parts of the pond 
are worth six. 

The first fisherman to reach 
100 points takes the honours and 
the best tactics are to go for the 
deeper fish — as those caught m 
shallow waters fight just as hard 
to become shark-fodder and only 
reward their captors with a lower 
point total. 

Two can play or one can try his 
luck against the computer, who 
proves a very able angler The 
Activision cartridge is for use on 
the Atari T.V. games centre and 
costs £16.95. 




If the game sounds familiar, it 
is because it's based on that 
popular arcade game Asteroids 
and already features in some 
form or another on most of the 
TV games centre systems — this 
is Philips' version, Satellite 
Attack. 

One change from the normal 
game is that this version features 
two types of meteorite. 

An ordinary asteroid is worth 
one point for a direct hit To get 
three points you must fire and 
destroy a magnetic asteroid. 
These can be identified by their 
constant high speed spinning as 
they whirl across the screen. 

You can boost your score by 
hitting alien spaceships which 
dart between the meteorites and 
these are worth 10 points apiece. 
But beware, the alien ships are 
piloted by beings equipped with 
super-laser guns which are com- 
puter controlled to home in your 
own spacecruiser. 

Among the other features is a 
protective forcefield which 
comes in handy when an asteroid 
slips through your fire, seems set 
to collide with your ship. 

This new cartridge lor the 
Philips G7000 games centre costs 
£15. 



CENTRES TV GAM^CENTRESTVGAMto^^" 





It is the games thai a T V. centre 
offers which will eventually 
make of break it in the high 
street 

Certain makes of T V. games 
centre have become associated 
with their best-selling software 
and this is the mark of their 
success. 

In video screens we will be 



looking at the "best sellers". 
Those cartridges which are 
always at the lorefront of adver- 
tising campaigns and whose 
features set the standard which 
the rest ol the machine's soft- 
ware must try to match. 

To start this series off, we 
look at Mattel Intellivision's 
top-selling cartridge, Soccer. 



THE ELECTRONIC TRIP 
TO A SOCCER SUMMER 



BESTSELLERS 



THE SLIPPERY 
OLYMPIC 
SLOPE 



SKHNG 



Any skier who takes as much 
punishment as the one on the 
treacherous, fir-tree-covered 
slopes m thts game, deserves an 
Olympic medal. 

The game sportsman wraps 
himself around just about every 
tree on the course, he stumbles 
at the patches of untenable grey 
ice and crashes into the slalom 
poles, carefully spread out down 
its length. 

But, every time, he pulls him- 
self to his skis and sets off again. 

And sure enough the courses 
gradually become easier, the 
turns tighter, the times faster. 

The Olympic sport lends itself 
well to electronic graphics and 
with five downhill (trees only) 
and five slalom (gates to pass 
through! courses of varying diffi- 
culty, it keeps the interest up. 

Speed and timing are the 
essence of the game. Speed is 
attained by facing downhill as the 
game mimics the sport by slow- 
ing down a skier who tackles the 
slope side on. 

With the Atari difficulty switch 
down the grey patches of ice, 
which cover the slopes, become 
treacherous, but you can |ump 
them at the push of the fire 
button 

The last of a recent batch of 
six cartridges from Activision for 
use with the Atari T.V. games 
centre. Skt-ing costs £1675 



The incredibly lifelike stars of the 
Intellivision Soccer game are the 
best advert Mattel and its British 
distributors. ACE, have in this 
football crazy country. 

As a generation of youngsters 
once created their own World 
Cup thrills with Subbuteo tour- 
naments in 1966, so a new gen- 
eration will bring their own elec- 
tronic Keegans and Brookings on 
to the fields of Spain in 1982 It all 
helps explain why Soccer is Intel- 
livision's best selling cartridge. 

Two teams of red and yellow 
players take to the Intellivision 
pitch to the accompaniment of 
the cheers and whistles of 
unseen supporters. A feature of 
the game is that only one third of 
the pitch can be seen at any one 
time and three men from each 
side roam around this area. 

The game revolves around the 
two "control" men of either side 
in different colqured strips from 



then team-mates; these are sent 
after the ball by the players and 
are usually the member of each 
side, who last touched the ball. 

The player with the ball at his 
feet has every chance of dribbl- 
ing past the entire team and 
reaching the opposing penalty 
area but is discouraged from 
doing so because the defender is 
just fast enough to catch him. 
Instead upheld passes hit "blind" 
into unseen areas of the pitch 
can be the telling tactic. 

The players can foul, take 
throw-ins. corners and dribble 
with a realism which has yet to 
be matched by other T V. games 
centres and it is the best Soccer 
cartridge so far available but 
whether it plays the sort of game 
which would bring the crowds 
back to English soccer, is open to 
doubt. Still at £18.95 it is cheaper 
than a season ticket at the 
Arsenal. 



BIG TOP 
BRAVERY 



JOMPING ACROBATS 



The excitement of the circus 
comes to life in your front room 
with a couple of acrobats bounc- 
ing off a seasaw to burst high 
flying balloons. 

Each balloon an acrobat hits 
scores him a varying number of 
points. 

It's not as easy as it sounds. 
The skill of the game is in judging 
the positioning of the seesaw 
when your acrobat jumps off the 
platform — he jumps from either 
end of the screen. A miss and he 
crashes headfirst to the ground. 
Where your acrobat hits the 
seesaw, determines the height 
and angle ol his next lump 

It you catch the plucky fellow 
right on the end of the see-saw 
his next leap will be prodigious 
and should burst plenty of bal 
loons. Nearer the fulcrum, he will 
only manage a tiny |ump A high 
jump speeds things up and calls 
for really sharp reactions. 

When you have gone through 
10 brave acrobats, the game is 
over In the harder versions, a 
shield appears just below the 
rows of balloons, which makes it 
more difficult to pop the balloons 
and gives you less time to judge 
where the flying acrobat will 
land. 

Just to complicate the game 
even further, there is an option 
for moving balloons instead of 
static ones Altogether there are 
18 different game versions con 
tamed on this Philips Videopac 
for the G70O0 T V. computer 
games system. It is difficult to 
master the tactics of this game at 
first but it is extremely addictive 
A proven winner on other games 
centres. 

Jumping Acrobats sells for the 
usual Videopac price of £15. 




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80 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




BY DAVID ANNAL 



WHEN you are offered a "micro- 
chip orchestra" or an "instant 
musician" for £36 it is easy to 
shrug off the claims as pure 
advertising jargon. 

In the first of a series of occa- 
sional reviews on sound equip- 
ment, books and software pack- 
ages. 1 am investigating these 
claims, made by the manufac- 
turers of the VL-Tone mini- 
synthesiser. What do you get for 
your money? 

I had better admit that I have 
spent quite some time playing 
with and on Casio's VL-Tone and 
thoroughly enjoyed every 
minute. 

The instrument is a mono- 
phonic synthesiser, playing one 
note at a time but incorporating 
in the package a simple rhythm 
generator which, if required, 
will accompany the tune with a 
suitable beat generated on 
"bongos" and "brushes". There 
are 10 different rhythms avail- 
able, varying from a simple 
march to a complicated bos- 
sanova. 

The whole instrument mea- 
sures 11 in x 3in x lin and 
includes a speaker and internal 
batteries. An external power 
pack is available for running the 
unit from the mains. The bat- 



together but space is sacrificed 
for compactness, and compact it 
is! 

The keyboard covers a range 
of more than two octaves and an 
octave switch is provided which 
lowers or raises the pitch of the 
keyboard by an additional 
octave. A "voice" switch causes 
the sound produced to mimic one 
of five in-built instrumental 
types. These are: piano, violin, 
flute, guitar and fantasy. 

The actual sounds made are 
far from the possibilities of a 
full-blown synthesiser but they 
are sufficiently life-like to 
deserve their titles — just! 

The fantasy sound has a 
pleasant "ring" to it, together 
with vibrato and a long decay 
after the key has been released. 
Each note on the keyboard is 
numbered and, when played, 
this note number is shown on the 
L.C.D. display. Controls are pro- 
vided to adjust the overall vol- 
ume and also the balance bet- 
ween the percussion effect and 
the chosen voice. 

So it is possible to play a tune 
on a small keyboard instrument 
which sounds almost like the 
real thing and which can be 
accompanied by an appropriate 
percussion rhythm. 

Inside the VL-Tone there is a 
memory which can remember up 
to 100 notes. If the function 




teries last for quite a long time, 
however, and an auto shut down 
is provided which conserves 
them by turning the instrument 
off if it is left for more than six 
minutes without being asked to 
do something. 

The "keys" are. in reality, 
small black or white buttons, as 
appropriate, but they operate 
very easily and precisely and 
last trills are possible. 

An experienced musician 
might find that they are too close 



switch is set to record and a tune 
is played, this tune will be 
stored in memory and can be 
recalled at will. The voice used, 
and the tempo of playback, can 

be varied. 

Percussion can be used ; if 
required and the notes entered 
need not be in "rhythm" or of the 
correct duration — they can be 
altered afterwards. This means 
that an inexperienced musician 
can enter notes in his own time 
as he works out what they are 




music 



plete 
as been 
ck using 






attack time. 



from a sheet of musk or copies 
them from one of the easy entry 
tunes listed ia the music book 
which accompanies the instru- 
ment. 

Having 
pieced the 
stored is then play< 
the one-key play facility. Each 
time this key is pressed, the next 
note of the remembered tune is 
produced. It can now be played 
to sound light by ear and it will 
be re-reffiembered in its new 
form! The rhythm section can be 
used to keep you ui time but will 
not be remembered as well. The 
whole, tune canSrw $fjit?* aved 
through by one press on the 
"auto play" buttoi.Y 

Another excellent facility is 
on the VL-Tone. the 
set up yoxir own indi- 
ice". This remarkable 
can be programmed 
to remember 
envelope patt 

Millions of ^mbinat5(ij^are 

which 

type. 

sustain 

level, sustain time, release time, 
vibrato and tremulo. 

The setting combination of 
those you like, should be noted 
down before erasing them. The 
instrument will remember the 
last programmed envelope and 
this will be stored at power off. 

Will it do anything else? Well 
it will tune to a concert pitch for 
playing with other instruments, 
it has an output jack which 
enables it to be connected to an 
external amplifier, such as that 
described last month (or an even 
more powerful one), it can play 
your programmed tune four 
times in a row if requested, it 
comes complete with a com- 
prehensive tune book and it also 
contains its own in-built demon- 
stration tune, called "German 
Folk Song". 

Oh, and 1 almost forgot, you 
can use the VL-Tone as an eight- 
figure L.C.D. calculator to per- 
form all the usual arithmetic, 
including square roots and per- 
centages with the use of up to 
four constants and a full memory 
recall facility! 



CAN YOU SAVE MIDDLE EARTH BY 
RESCUING FRODO FROM 
SHELOB'S LAIR...? 

LORD OF THE RINGS 

Lord of the Rings is an entirely new type of game, combining a little of the 
principle of the 'Adventure' type of game, using words as spells, etc; a 
little of the 'Quest' principle of moving around the 'rooms'; plus actual 
graphics showing the various levels, walls, doors, nasties and yourself. 
Frodo. 

The appeal of the game is that it combines skill and chance, so that 
though developing strategies are important, there is no guarantee that 
having learnt a strategy it will work twice! 

The game is an adaption of Tolkien's book The Lord of the Rings', spell words actually being taken from 
the book as are the characters. 

Tolkien enthusiasts will not need convincing of the necessity of saving Middle Earth by escaping from 
Shelob's Lair; those without this background knowledge will have to play a few games before they become 
addicted! 

In your quest to cast the ring into the Crack of Doom to destroy its evil power you will travel a long and 
dangerous road. The Lair is on many levels, so you must find the stairs, and beware of the clever nasties, 
monsters and dwarves which can detect you from a distance and rush for your gold, which you need to 
bribe. There are secret tunnels, monster's tombs and the like. 

During your travels you can meet Shelob herself, a Fiery Balrog, Lord of the Nazgul, a Hideous Hill-Troll 
Chief, a Numakil from the Far Harrad. Hissing Gollum, a Howling Warg. a Barrow-Wight and all those 
characters of spell words. 

The game, though easy to actually play is complicated in itself with many and varied happenings along the 
way. But its advantage is that all the time you can see and manipulate yourself in eight different directions. 

Peter and Margaret Hutt have developed and produced a most absorbing, and certainly addictive, 
game... £9.50 




* 0246 850357 KAI 



Programs are (or the Tandy TRS 80 and Video Gente. All prices are VAT paid and postage free Same 
day return first class post service. All software fully guaranteed and in stock as we are the actual 
publishers, not the retailers. Free catalogue upon request. 



KANSAS CITY SYSTEMS. UNIT 3. SUTTON SPRING WOOD. CHESTERFIELD S44 5XF 



ZX81 1K PROGRAMS 
FROM VIDEO SOFTWARE LIMITED 

These programs are written to the same high standard as our highly 
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ZX81 IK PARTY TRICKS NO 1 include*:- 

* SHOOT. Pick your spot, lake the penally and watch (he goalie attempt to 

save — sometimes he succeeds 

■ SKETCH Ute cursor keys to draw large pictures — almost lull screen and 
save them on tape 

* NAME THE DAY. Calculates the day of the weak corresponding to any valid 

date <n the twentieth century. 

* DRIVE THE TRAIN. Ever wanted 10 drive a train? This little program will 

amuse the youngest members ot the family. 

* ONQER WONGER Watch the compute, draw its own pictures and set it up 
to draw yours. 

* WEATHER An endless variety ol regional weather forecasts — all ol them 

inaccurate, but then so are the real ones 

* UFO The inevitable space game. Shoot down the circling UFO using your 

photon torpedo under keyboard control 

* WHO SHOT JR? Four suspects, four places, four times ol day. lour 

weapons- From the clues given deduce who shot JR. 

* HELD GUN. You are the officer in charge ol a field gun. Can you hit the 

target? 

* MYSTERY PROGRAM Still to be deeded, but .1 will be as good as the 

others. 

NOTE These programs are NOT suitable for ZX80. 

Send cash with order to: Manual only with fully 

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Kinver, Stourbridge, Deluxe boxed set - ideal 

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MORE NEW REAL TIME GAMES 
FOR ATOM USERS 

G0 100 POLECAT: Avoid being eaten by the po4ecat searching the 
maze for you. 5K text 6K graphics £4 96 

G0101 EARLY WARNING: Destroy the attacking ICBM's using a 
realistic radar display and intercept missiles. 48 levels. Sound. 
Score and screen counters. 4K text 6K graphics £4 95 

G0 102 MINEFIELD: Watch out for chain -react>ons as you clear the 
mines with your tank. Each mission becomes harder! Sound. 
Score and high score. 5K text V* K graphics £4.95 

G0103 TANGLED: Challenge your friend or the Atom to this game of 
sk*. The more you score the harder you find the game. Four skiU 
levels Sound. Individual and highest scores displayed. 5K text 
JK graphics £3.95 

E0200 TIME TUTOR: Teach your children the time the modern way. 

the program randomly selects a time and displays it on a 
standard dock face, responding to the students input telling the 
con Oct time if the student is wrong. Makes learning fun Sound. 

Score. 5K text 5* K graphics £3.95 

• SPECIAL OFFER • (supplied on one tape) 

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\ & VIDEO GAMES 



SOME inventive use of graphics 
should provide you with a 
suitably stylish missile launcher 
at the bottom of your space 
invaders' screen but now you 
will need something to fire at the 
"meanies". 

A missile can be launched by 
pressing any key if the GET 
statement is used. The move- 
ment of the missile across the 
screen is generated by using a 

simple loop. 

The length of the delay deter- 
mines the speed at which the 
missile moves. A Basic program, 
written for the Pet. to fire a mis- 
sile up the screen in the way 
described is: 
10 PRINT "(CLST 
20 POKE 33747,81 : POKE 33707.93 

30 Q = 33667 

40 GET CS : IF CS = " " THEN 40 

50 FOR I = 1 TO 23 

60 POKE Q, 46 

70 FOR J = 1 TO 20 : NEXT J 

80 POKE Q, 32 
90 Q = Q - 40 
100 NEXT I 
110 GOTO 30 

The way to see if the missile 
has hit a target is to look ahead 
of the missile to see if anything 
is in the way. 

On the video screen, it is 
reasonable to assume that if the 
next missile position contains 
anything other than a space then 
the missile has hit a target and 
an explosion should occur! The 
previous loop can be modified to 
give this: 

PLOT MISSILE 

DELAY 

t 

BLANK OUT MISSILE 



t 

NO 



CALCULATE 
NEXT POSITION 

ANYTHING 
THERE? 



GO FOR YOUR MISSILE LAUNCHER 



Shooting a space invader out ol the 
sky is not the simple task It might 
seem. 

Having shown how to draw the 
alien horrors and make them move. 




in my first two columns, it is now 
time to finish them oft and so com- 
plete the fundamentals of the space 
invader game. 

While most of the arcade space 
invader games contain the same 
6502 microprocessor as the Pet, 
Apple and other microcomputers, 
their programs are written In 
machine code, rather than Basic, tor 
reasons of speed. However, the 
methods contained in the programs 
are the same whatever language 
they are written in, and by present- 
ing programs in Basic the methods 
can be understood relatively easily. 

The program fragments presented 
show in turn, how to lire and display 
a missile, how to detect whether the 
missile has hit a target and how to 
combine these to tire at a moving 
target. The methods and ideas 
behind the programs can be 
modified and adapted for much more 
sophisticated programs. 



YES 



CREATE EXPLOSION 



BY GARRY MARSHALL 



A program for this is: 
10 POKE 33747, 81 : POKE 33707, 

93 

20 Q = 33667 

40 GET CS : IF CS = "" THEN 40 

50 FOR I - 1 TO 23 

60 POKE Q. 46 

70 FOR I = 1 TO 20 : NEXT J 

80 POKE Q, 32 

90 Q - Q - 40 

100 IF PEEK (Q) < > 32 THEN 200 

110 NEXT I 

120 GOTO 20 

200 POKE Q. 160 

210 POKE Q - 40, 160 : POKE Q + 

I, 160 

220 POKE Q + 40, 160 : POKE Q - 
L, 160 

230 POKE Q - 40. 124 : POKE Q + 
1, 108 

240 POKE Q + 40, 123 : POKE Q - 
1, 126 

250 GOTO 210 

This program gives the explo- 
sion effect generated by lines 200 
to 250 if the missile hits any 
non-space character left on the 
screen when the program is run. 



There is plenty ol scope for pro- 
ducing imaginative explosion 
effects. 

A slight modification to the 
previous loop gives the basis of 
a program tor shooting missiles 
at a moving target. The loop is: 

PLOT MISSILE 
MOVE TARGET 

BLANK OUT MISSILE 

1 

CALCULATE NEXT POSITION 
ANYTHING 



NO 



THERE? 

i 

YES 



CREATE EXPLOSION 

The previous program can be 
modified to realise this. An 
instruction to clear the screen 
should be added to the begin- 
ning. At line 30 a call to a sub- 
routine to plot the target should 
be included, and line 70 
replaced by a call to a sub- 
routine that moves the target. 




WW 




last month, I left you this program: 

10 FOR I 1 TO 2 

20 FOR J = 1 TO 4 

30 PRINT "XXXX XXXX" 

40 NEXT J 

1 TO 4 
XXXX 



XXXX' 



50 FOR K 
60 PRINT 
70 NEXT K 
80 NEXT I 
90 END 

II you were able to RUN this pro- 
gram, you would have had the fol- 
lowing pattern printed. 

XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 
XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

XXXX XXXX 

To make it easier tor you to under- 
stand how the pattern is produced. I 
could describe the program as fol- 
lows: 

repeat 2 times 
repeat 4 times 

print first line of pattern 
end repeat 

repeat 4 times 

print second line of pattern 
end repeat 
end repeat 

You can see how all sorts of pat- 
terns could be developed by printing 
the appropriate strings of characters 
— blanks and non-blanks — within 
loops. By extending the above pro- 
gram, you could print a representa- 
tion of a chessboard. With careful 
planning (and a good imagination), 
you can use this simple technique lo 
"draw" anything from a spaceship to 
a personal portrait. 




REMEMBER 
TO 1NCLOOE 
COMMENTS 

There are two techniques that 
can be used to make programs 
easier to read and, therefore, 
easier to understand. These are:- 
the use of comments in your 
programs, and indenting chosen 
lines of your program. 

To illustrate these techniques, 
I will rewrite a previous pro- 
gram. 

10 REM PROGRAM TO SUM 5 
PAIRS OF NUMBERS 

20 REM 

30 FOR I = 1 TO 5 

40 REM INPUT A 

PAIR OF NUM- 
BERS 

50 INPUT A,B 

60 REM PRINT THE 

SUM OF THE PAIR 
70 PRINT A +B 




80 NEXT I 

90 END 

Comments can be inserted by 
the use of REM statements. 
"REM" indicates to the computer 
that the rest of the line is com- 
ment. 

By including extra spaces, 
lines can be indented to improve 
the lay-out of a program. In par- 
ticular, this can be used to 
clearly show the beginning and 
end of a loop. 

Unfortunately, although it is 
good programming practice to 
use these techniques, they are 
often omitted in programs for 
microcomputers. The amount of 
space for storing programs is 
often very small and therefore 
comments are omitted to keep 
the size of a program to a 
minimum. However, unless the 
size of a program is critical, you 
should include comments as 
they are helpful to the program- 
mer and others who will use the 
program. 



With an ordinary keyboard (simi- 
lar to a typewriter keyboard), the 
quality of the pictures you can 
produce will be very limited. For 
this reason, many of the micro- 
computers have keyboards with 
special "graphic keys". 

These keys produce characters 
such as: 



BHD 



The use of these special 
characters will allow the pro- 
grammer to selectively "shade" 
areas of the screen. As a result, 
the quality and range of pictures 



84 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



that can be printed will be much 
greater. 

You now have sufficient know- 
ledge of Basic to enable you to 
write programs to produce these 
pictures — it is simply a matter 
of experimenting with combina- 
tions of these graphic characters 
until you achieve the desired 
result! 

Some microcomputer key- 
boards also have keys for the 
characters: 

4 ¥ ♦ * 

This is obviously useful tor 
writing programs to play card 
games. 





I have looked at programs with 
loops created by a matching pair 
of statements of the form: 
40 FOR I = 1 TO 5 



80 NEXT I 

The effect of this pair of state- 
ments is to cause the set of 
statements "bracketed" by them 
to be repeated five times. 

The variable "I" acts as a 
count variable. Initially. "I" is 
given the value 1. Each time the 
instruction "NEXT I" is reached, 
the value of "I" is increased by 1 
and the loop is repeated. This 
process continues until the new 
value of "1" would exceed the 
upper limit of 5. At this point, the 
computer stops looping and pro- 
ceeds with the program. 



2 

NCXTI If 

CALCULATE 



assumed to be a step-size of I. 

In the above example. "X" will 
take the values 2, 4. 6. 8, . . . 20 
and the loop will be repeated 10 
times. 

It is also possible to have a 
negative step-size. Clearly, this 
means that the initial value of 
the variable must be greater 
than the final value. 
30 FOR Y - 5 TO 1 STEP -1 



In this way. "I" will take the 
values 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. in that 
order, and it is therefore a count 
of the number of times round the 
loop. 

My reason for explaining in 
detail the operation of the FOR 
and NEXT statements is that I 
now want to introduce loops of 
the form 

40 For X - 2 TO 20 STEP 2 



70 NEXT X 

The format of the NEXT state- 
ment remains the same, but 
there are two important changes 
to the FOR statement. 

Firstly, the initial value of the 
variable is a value other than 1 
in this case the initial value 

will be 2. 

Secondly, a "step-size" of 2 has 
been specified. Each time the 
instruction "NEXT X" is reached, 
the value of "X" will be 
increased by 2. In general, if no 
"step-size" is specified in the 
FOR statement, then it is 



60 NEXT Y 

In this case, "Y" will take the 
values 5. 4, 3, 2 and 1, in that 
order. 

These types of FOR statement 
are useful when you are required 
to repeat a calculation for a 
pre-determined set of values. 
The FOR and NEXT statements 
can be used in this way to actu- 
ally generate the required set of 
values. 

For example assume you want 
to print a table of squares of all 
even numbers in the range 2-20. 1 
have already given an example 
of a FOR statement that will 
generate the required set of even 
numbers. The complete program 
would be: 

10 REM PROGRAM TO PRINT 
TABLE OF SQUARES 

20 REM OF EVEN NUMBERS IN 
THE RANGE 2-20 

30 REM 

40 FORX =2 TO 20 STEP 2 

50 PRINT X. X*X 

60 NEXT X 

70 END 





GWt US A CHANCE 

Most games involve an ele- 
ment of chance. In order that you 
may write programs to play 
games, you must have some way 
of introducing the concept of 
chance, or luck, in your program. 
Next month, I will show you how 
this can be done using the Basic 
function "RND". _ 

I will also introduce the "IF" 
statement. This statement can 
be used to select alternative sec- 
tions of your program depending 
upon, tor example the data typed 
in when the program is RUN. 




"MPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 85 



OFTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE 





Decathlon has become a fash- 
ionable word since Daley 
Thompson brought back a gold 
medal from Moscow, and now 
the 10 events are available on 
one cassette. 

Olympic Decathlon is one of 
the best games packages on 
the market and takes you 
through all 10 athletics events 
using superb graphics. 

The events are 100 metre 
dash, long jump, shot put. high 
jump, 400 metre dash. 110 
metre hurdles, discus, pole 
vault, javelin and 1500 metre 
run. 

The aim is to get as many 
points in each event and to 
beat the present world record if 
possible. Up to six competitors 
may enter any one event — and 
there is a very necessary prac- 
tice facility to allow the player 
to get familiar with the. some- 
times, rather complicated keying 



A GOLD MEDAL WINNER 



and control sequence. 

The 100 metre dash requires 
the use of tout keys. 

The speed of pressing 
alternate keys determines the 
speed of moving along the 
track. The long jump requires 
the use of the "X" and 
"Return" keys. 

As the athlete moves along 
the track pressing the "X" by 
keys plants the foot for takeoff, 
and the time until the 
"Return" is pressed deter- 
mines the angle of take-off — it 
is very difficult. The next event 
— the shot put - - is even more 
difficult. 

It needs games paddles — 
each dial determining the 



amount of energy going to the 
shoulder or tricep muscles. It is 
very easy to get the shot going 
backwards, falling on your head, 
or dropping on your toes — 
everything except going for- 
ward! 

The high jump is similar to 
the long jump requiring use of 
the "X" and "Return" keys. 
The 400 metre dash follows the 
same rules as the 100 metre 
version. The 110 metre hurdles 
requires the push buttons on 
the paddles. 

The discus throw is controlled 
by the "Space" bar and the 
"Return" key. The former starts 
the rotation of the athlete, the 
latter determines the point of 



release and away it sails. 

Pole vault is by tar the most 
skilful event, requiring co- 
ordination of five keys — two 
being pressed alternatively to 
determine the speed, another 
to determine the planting point, 
another to pull to the hand- 
stand, and the fifth to push the 
pole away. I have yet to see 
anyone successfully attempt itl 

The javelin throw is similar, 
but only requires four keys. 
Finally the 1500 metres needs 
four keys to control the direc- 
tion of run. 

The highest score so far 
achieved by those testing this 
program was around 5,000. As 
10,000 is possible you can see 
how far we have to go. 

In conclusion, this is one of 
the best games programs avail- 
able, and is highly recom- 
mended to all Apple users at a 
cost of £13.95. 



DOZENS OF DEATHS TO LIVE THR0DGH 



"Death can come swiftly at the 
hands of the little creatures who 
have lent their name to the 
adventure game Goblins. 

The game runs on a 48K Apple 
and is one of the growing stable 
of graphically illustrated adven- 
ture games from the U.S. firm of 
Highlands Computer Services. As 
with most adventure games the 
object is to wander around an 
imaginary stretch of countryside 
littered with valuable and magical 
items, horrendous monsters and 
rather nasty traps, with the 
intention of emerging from the 
trip both somewhat richer and 
still in one piece. 

Goblins follows this now tradi- 
tional mould. The player has to 
pit his wits against a variety of 
traps and monsters and accumu- 
late a score, judged, in a fairly 
arbitrary way, by the computer. 

The game makes use of the 
Apple's hi-resolution graphics 
capabilities by displaying to the 
player a scene representing that 
faced by the adventurer, and 
there is even an occasional piece 
of animation thrown in for good 



measure. Unfortunately one limi- 
tation of the graphics is that the 
scene displayed does not always 
correspond accurately to the 
choice of directions available. 

Every so often during the 
course of the game, the player 
catches a glimpse of, what I at 
first took to be, a demented rab- 
bit but what is, in fact, one of the 
goblins mentioned in the title of 
the game. 

And on occasion (usually if 
your adventurer has been loiter- 
ing about in the same location for 
more than a couple of movesMhe 
goblin rushes towards you — 
with a good chance of killing your 
adventurer stone dead on the 
spot. 

It's a Tault of which a number 
of adventure games suffer but 
Goblins is particularly infuriating 
for the number of times the 
player finds his adventurer con- 
fronted with a sudden and arbit- 
rary death. Maybe it was the 
aftershave some of my 
adventurers were wearing, 
but a succession of 
them were dispatched^ 



byviciousgoblinswithoutsomuch Goblins is not without its fair 

as a warning glimpse that one share of bugs. The command 

was in the vicinity. "look down" generated the pu/zl 

The game also features sev- ing response "The title is 'IgpeT 

eral fatal traps which result Atlina' ". I found later in the 

either in instant (and unpro- game a book where this same 

vokedl death or a situation response more appropriately 

involving little prospect of resulted from the command 

escape. The fairest, and most "read cover" I also found other 

imaginative, death I suffered was problems with the Egyptian 

whilst sinking in quicksand: Scarab obiect 

responding to the program's Goblins will doubtless be very 

(unhelpful) advice to lighten my popular with keen adventure 

load I foolishly dropped some games players — although I 

limes I had found earlier in the found it a good deal less addic- 

expedition.onlytosufferfatallyas tive than most adventures. The 

they turned the quicksand to game comes with no instruction 

quick-setting cementl leaflet and only very brief 

Mind you, if you find you are instructions on disc It costs 

doing well in the course of a _ £15.95 
game. Goblins does 
allow you to save 
the game m 
progress on 
disc. 




■-- 




3fM 



EAT AND BE 
EATEN . . . 

Super Glooper and Meteorites 
are the latest arcade games to 
come out o1 the Supersoft stable 
and excellent games they are 
tool 

Both are written in machine 
code (like all Supersoft arcade 
games) which means of course, 
that they are very fast and get 
faster with every level you sur- 
vive. 

Super Glooper was inspired by 
the popular Puckman game you'd 
spend 20p on in the amusement 
arcades. 

The object is to move round a 
maze, "glooping" all of the little 
dots in the maze. After a certain 
number of dots have been 
"glooped", the glooper eaters. 




which have been penned up in 
the centre of the maze, will come 
after you. 

The number at the top of the 
maze tells you how many eaters 
will be released. When you clear 
the maze of dots, more eaters 
will be released to hunt you. 

Once the eaters have been 



released, there are two ways to 
escape: first you can leave the 
maze by one of two exits and 
reappear on the opposite side, 
luckily, the eaters cannot follow" 
You can also "gloop" one of the 
four larger dots at the corners of 
the maze, the eaters change col- 
our and rush off; this is your 



NO HIDING PLACE IN THIS INVASION 



Li 



American professionalism has 
brought home the shortcoming 
of many of our own software 
houses by producing two of the 
best Sinclair games cassettes 
around. 

U.S. firm, Beam Software, 
offers Double Breakout and 
Super Invasion at £6 each — 
distributed over here by Essen- 
tial Software. 

Super Invasion is available in 
two forms — one for the origi- 
nal ZX80 and the other for the 
ZX81/ZX80 with 8K ROM. The 
documentation on all the Beam 
Software programs is very 
good, with the rear of the 
instruction sheet having a com- 
prehensive description for fool- 
proof loading of the cassettes. 

Super Invasion is a very basic 
form of space invaders without 
the usual "barriers" that give 
protection from the invader's 
bombs. This makes it rather dif- 
ficult to win, especially as you 
only have five lasers to fire, and 
you lose one each time you are 
hit. Once all the lasers have 
been destroyed, the game stops 
for a few seconds and then 
starts again. 

There are three levels of skill, 
and even the lowest is rela- 
tively difficult! The graphics are 




very good, with no screen 
flicker (even on the old ZX80) 
and smooth control of the laser 
platform. A slightly more 
sophisticated version is avail- 
able for 2K 2X80 old ROM on 
the reverse of the ZX80 version. 

2X80 Double Breakout is 
another machine code program 
which also has some very 
smooth graphics. There are 
seven levels of skill, with four 
being for the average player. 
You are given nine tries to 



break through two "walls". A 
bat is manoeuvrable in the ver- 
tical direction and the object of 
the game is to keep hitting the 
ball back at the wall so that 
bricks are dislodged progres- 
sively. Unfortunately, the ball 
bounces back at different ang- 
les. Sometimes you need to hit 
the ball with a moving bat to 
get the required spin. 

All three games represent 
good value for money, and are 
highly recommended. 



chance to eat them and gain 
extra points but you'll have to be 
quick because they change back 
and chase you again. If you 
"gloop" an eater it returns to the 
pen ready to fight again! You 
have three gloopers per game. 
This game will certainly get the 
old heart rate going. 

The object of Meteorites is to 
defend your seven moon bases 
against a savage meteorite 
attack. 

Your only defence is a single 
laser cannon, directed of course 
by the numeric key pad. I found it 
very difficult at first but it 
shouldn't take you long to master 
the technique. 

The meteorites will come at 
you in waves of six, as the level 
increases, they come thicker and 
faster, and of course the higher 
the level, the higher the points 
gained when you hit one! 

However, if you should miss 
one and it smashes into the sur- 
face of the planet you lose points 
and a base — should it hit one. 
There's a nice visual effect in this 
game, when a meteorite does hit 
the surface the mountain range 
on the screen shakes. 

After you've destroyed the 
first wave you will be awarded an 
extra base and the level of play 
goes up! Apparently something 
happens after the fifth level, but 
as I've never managed to reach 
the fourth level I can't tell you 
what it is, at the moment any- 
way! 

Both Super Glooper and 
Meteorites have good sound 
effects. Two excellent games 
with excellent graphics to keep 
the whole family amused for 
hours (if your fingers can keep up 
the pace}. 

Both run on an 8K Pet and cost 
C8 plus V.A.T. each. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 87 



SJSIiH 



An education in computers 

starts with you! 



There is another side to microcomputing, just as 
interesting as games; especially if you are a 
responsible parent or a teacher with responsibility 
for teaching computing or using computers as 
teaching aids. Computers in Education is an 
important and expanding field the implications 
and potential is only just beginning to be realised 
If you have children, or are a teacher you have a 
responsibility to keep yourself informed of 
developments in this area. Educational 
Computing is written for you 

Every issue is packed with useful and up to date 
information covering product news, conference 
news, opinions, advice application stories, case 
studies and a forum for you to discuss your 
concerns and interests. 

Each month we select a specific applications area 
In the past we have looked at such subjects as 
Mathematics. Home Economics. Business 
Studies and Engineering In the coming months 
we will be looking at Social Sciences. English. 
Computer Science and History. 

We show the many interesting ways people are 
using computers as teaching aids. And give 
practical advice and guidance. 

Educational Computing also publishes 
comprehensive surveys that are packed with the 
kind of information you need to know. In the 
past we have looked at systems costing less than 
£600. Educational software, courses and training. 

If you are a teacher, the nature of your job and the 
responsibilities that go with it demand that you 
keep yourself informed of current affairs — and 
little is going to affect you. your colleagues and 
your students in this respect as much as computers. 



1 enclose a cheque for £6.50 (U.K.); Europe 
£12; non-Europe £14 Ten issues a year 
Cheques should be made payable to 
Educational Computing. 

Name 



Position 



Establishment 
Address 



Signed. 



.Date. 



NOW POST PLEASE TO: Educational 
Computing. 8 Herbal Hill. London EC1 5JB 



If you are a responsible parent you will want to 
know what your children are being taught in 
schools about the new technology. Many parents 
are diligent members of their local PTA. From 
January we shall carry a regular feature looking 
at the many ways PTAs have helped schools raise 
money for computers, peripherals and software. 

The best way of keeping yourself directly informed 
is to subscribe to Educational Computing 



IB 



Simply fill out the form 




Educational Computing 

the magazine looking to the future. 



88 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



MICRO GEN QUALITY PROGRAMS 
ZX 81 CHESS ZX NEW YORK 



LOOK AT THESE FEATURES 

* Graphic display of positions on chess board 

* Displays separate record of your move and the 
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* Plays all legal moves including castling and 
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answer illegal move 

* Six levels of play 

* Random weighting computer doesn't always play 
the same move in an identical situation 

* Board can be set up to any configuration and you 
can even alter or exchange sides in midgame 

* Amazing power in 10K of memory 
PLUS CHESS CLOCK! 

* Records and display time taken per player 

* Resetable function 

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1K Space Intruders £5.00 
3KSuper Version £6.00 

Written in machine code 
to give Fasl moving 
'HOW Free' graph**. 
A superb achievement 

Si<*»eO on asset* witn »<s'"«g 

16KHigh Resolution £4.00 
(192x184)graphic pictures 

Neve' before achieved on the ZX 
C-eate your own aTwort 

Suooiiea on cassette mth listing 
ana dsnxtnstraiton active 



9K Nightmare Park £3.75 

The part ol DEATH - can 
you get through this 
nightmare No human has 
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taken to your wits end 
Stop/ieO on cassette only 



Specify 4K.8K ROM or ZX81 when ordering 



NEW INTERACTIVE GRAPHICS for (he 16k ZX81 



DRAGON MAZE . . . are you cunning enough to evade 
the dragon? you are impeded by darkness | the walls 
are only displayed when you make a bad move, this 
gives the dragon an advantage. Vou have to play by 
the rules - the dragon breaks them when he gets 
angry. Fun tor all ages ! 

Cassette and listing C5.OO'/orZX0Jc*fv> 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 89 



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ZX80 — ZX 81 
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Tape recorder interface unit. Designed to 
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Treasure 

Space Adventure 

Impossible Maze 

Cowboy Round- Up 

MX 60 Composer 

Grand Prix 

One Man One Dog 

Kaletdo 

Spies 

The Pit 

Road Race 

Alligator 



Word Power 
History 
Geography 
Memory Test 
Mutt Tables 
F tench 
German 
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Math Test 
Maths Dnll 
Master Mind 



MORRISTON COMPUTER CENTRE 

46 CROWN STREET, 
» MORRISTON. 
SWANSEA. Tel: 795817 





A beginner's guide to plain jargon 



ARGUMENT The known refer- 
ence factor necessary to find the 
desired item in a table. 

ARRAY A series of items (data or 
information) arranged to form a 
meaningful pattern. 

ARRAY INDICES Symbols or 
numbers used to identify a par- 
ticular quantity in an array. 

BITS Binary digiTS. The Os and Is 
that make up the binary code 
computers understand. 

BUG A slang term given to a 
mistake in a computer program 
which prevents it working. It can 
refer to a mechanical, electrical 
or electronic defect in a com- 
puter. 

BYTE A term to measure a 
number of bits (binary digits), 
usually eight bits to a byte. 

CHIP A tiny piece of silicon 
which holds all the components 
that make up a microprocessor. 

CHARACTER STRING A sequ- 
ence of characters in a row. 

FOR . . . NEXT A Basic state- 
ment which is an instruction 
used for repetition of a sequence 
of program statements (see 
loop). 

FUNCTION A special purpose or 
characteristic action of a prog- 
ram. 

GOSUB A Basic command 
instructing the computer to go to 
a subroutine in a computer prog- 
ram. 

GOTO A Basic command which 
tells the computer* to jump to 
another line in a computer prog- 
ram. 

GRAPHICS CHARACTERS The 

name given to pictorial rep- 
resentation of data such as plot- 
ted graphs, engineering draw- 
ings and computer games. 



HARDCOPY A printed copy of 
machine output in a visually 
readable form. 

HARDWARE A general term 
given to all pieces of electronic 
and mechanical devices which 
make up a computer system, i.e. 
the actual machines. 

INPUT Information which is fed 
into the computer. 

INTEGER A number which does 
not contain a decimal point, i.e. 
a whole number. 

K Abbreviation for Kilobyte. 

KILOBYTE A measurement of 
memory capacity. 1024 bytes of 
memory. So 8K is equivalent to 
8192 bytes. 

L.E.D. (Light Emitting Diode) 

Provides a simple display and 
consists of an electron tube 
which lights up when electricity 
is passed through it. Used as an 
alternative to liquid crystal dis- 
plays in calculators and 
watches. 

LET A Basic statement which 
defines a variable. E.g. LET 
A=0. 

LOOP A Basic function referring 
to the repeated execution of a 
series of instructions for a fixed 
number of times. 

MACHINE CODE The term used 
to refer to symbols or numbers 
assigned to parts of a machine. 
It is the same as operation code 
which is the symbol telling the 
computer what operation to per- 
form. When a game is written in 
machine code it makes every- 
thing happen more swiftly. 

MEMORY A measurement of how 
much information a computer 
can cope with. 

MICROPROCESSOR another 
name for a chip. 



90 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



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NEXT (See FOR . . . NEXT). 

PEEK A statement used in Basic 
which allows you to read the 
contents oi a specified memory 
address. 

POKE An instruction used in 
most versions of Basic allowing 
you to store integers in a specific 
place in memory. 

PRINT A Basic command which 
tells the computer to perform a 
calculation in a program. 

PRINTOUT The data output from 
the computer which appears in 
printed form. 

PROCESSING Handling and 
manipulating computer data. 

PROGRAM (Computer) A series 
of instructions fed into a- compu- 
ter which will solve a problem or 
accomplish an objective. 



REM A basic statement which 
provides an explanation of key 
sections in a program. 

ROM (Read Only Memory) A 

memory chip which can only be 
read from and not written into. 

ROUTINE A set of coded compu- 
ter instructions used for a par- 
ticular function in a program. 

SOFTWARE The programs fed 
into a computer, which make 
them perform • what we want 
them to do. 

STRING A connected sequence 
of characters, words or other 
elements usually symbolised 
with the $ (dollar) sign. 

SUBROUTINE A computer pro- 
gram routine that is translated 
separately, generally used in 
several computer programs or 
several times in one program. 




PROGRAM LOGIC Making sure 
a program is designed and input 
to the correct sequence. 

RAM (Random Access Memory) 

This is a memory chip which you 
can load programs and data to 
and from. There are different 
sized RAMs capable of storing 
various amounts of information. 



TABLE A collection of informa- 
tion suitably written for easy 
reference. 

VALUE The numerical quantity 
of a data element, and is the 
number assigned to a variable. 

VARIABLE A symbol whose 
numeric value can be changed 
at all times. It is used when writ- 
ing programs. 



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COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 91 



ASTROBIRDS |5K' « 6K 
graphics) 

Incredible GALAXIAN stylo 
program with fantastic 
sound effectsl Screaming 
missiles, swooping birdmen. 
Undoubtedly the best game 
on the market. £8.90 



LUNAR LANDER <5K" + 6K 
graphics) 

Superb high res. version. 
Long range scan, short range 
scan. Limited fuel supplies. 
Land the module with 
minimum impact. £8.90 



INVADER FORCE (5K- - 6K 
graphics) 

4 Invader types + mother 
ship. Great sound effects. 
High score. 6 skill levels & 
increasing difficulty. £8 90 



3D ASTEROIDS (3K- . 2K 
graphics) 

Steer through the rolling, 
hurtling asteroids coming 
out of the black void. ■ .citing 
new graphical represents 

tion. 



»»»#*#****#*******»****•*• 

M2K) AT LAST! ! fvVC code * mode 3 graph- 



ics. Look ahead up to 8 moves. Offensive, Norma) & 
defensive play. 10 sub-levels. Castling. "En Pas- 
sant" by player. Rejects illegal moves. Take back 
facility. Action replay with take-over. Set up prob- 
lem games. ONLY £9 90 

*****************#******** 



ACORN 
ATOM 



PROGRAMMER'S TOOLBOX (packed 4K EPROMI 
""1200 BAUD Cass op. systemVisible Load & Save 
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Find. Var, LVar. Dump. Renumber, Auto. Delete. 
Hex, iHex. 

'BASIC — Read, Data. Restore, Else. While, End- 
while, Cursor, Beep, Zero, On Error, Key X, Inkey 
$K, Stop. ONLY £24 45 



SUPER RACE-TRACK <12K) 
Draw your own race-track & 
race against the clock, steer- 
ing & accelerator controls. 

£4 90 

DAMBUSTERS (3K - 2K gr) 

Realistic bombing raids, 
bouncing bombs, ack-ack 
etc £490 



ALIEN MAZE (5K I 2K gr) 

Escape the 3D labyrinth 
before the Alien tracks you 
down. £5 90 

SPACE STORM (4K*) Survive 
amid the racing comets & 
space debris. £4.90 



MARTIANS <12K - VIA) Use 
your force field to stop them 
landing. Beware the impost- 
ers. Needs quick reactions. 

£7.90 

MAZE-BALL (12K) Very fast 
Ball-in-a-maze game with 
sound effects. Requires fast 
reactions. Timings & ratings 
given. £4.90 



DEMON DUNGEON <5K"Z 
Adventure game. Find the 
treasure in the depths of the 
dungeons Beware the lurk- 
ing demons whilst making 
your escape £6 90 



EXTRA MEMORY - Low power chips 

as recommended by Acorn 2 x 21 14L — £3 25 



Free Invaders program with WK of chips 



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ZX-81 



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A superb verston o* "he famous a re ode 
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QUICKSILVA, 95 UPPER BR0WNHILL ROAD, 
MAYBUSH, SOUTHAMPTON. HANTS 



ENNING 

244/248 Hertford Road. 
(Near Green Street) 
Enfield. FN3 5BL 
Tel 01 804-1767 

ATARI 



JENNINGS STORES LTD. 

244/8 HERTFORD ROAD. ENFIELD. MIDDX. EN3 58 L 

Tel: 01-804 1767. 
400 COMPUTER WITH 16K RAM 
800 COMPUTER WITH 16K RAM 
410 RECORDER 
810 DISK DRIVE 
822 THERMAL PRINTER 
853 16K RAM MEM MODULE 
40 04 PADDLE CONTROLLER 
850 INTERFACE 

SOFTWARE 




C320.OO 
€625 00 
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f 120.00 



STARRAIOERS 
SPACE INVADERS 
MUSIC COMPOSER 
SCRAM 

TOUCH TYPING 
ASTEROIDS 
BLACKJACK 
ASSEMBLER EDITOR 



ENERGY CZAR E8 96 

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8ASKETBALL £24 50 

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GRAPHIC £1195 

MISSILE COMMAND £29 96 
TECH NOTES & 

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£29.95 
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We are stocking all other manufactured software tor Atar. 
Orders to JENNINGS FREEPOST ENFIELD MIDDX EN3 4BR 

or Tel : 01-804 1767 

PAYMENT: 

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HP available. Send S A.E. for written quotations 
All prices include VAT & P&P 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 95 



MIDWICH COMPUTER CO. LTD 

(Dept C&V/2) 
HEWITT HOUSE, NORTH GATE STREET, 
BURY ST. EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK IP33 1 HQ 
TELEPHONE: (0284) 701321 TELEX: 817670 



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TRS80ModelsI+III 
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PO Box 39. Eastleigh. Hants. 505 5 WO 



ZX81 

CASSETTE ONE 

• REACT (m/c) 

• INVADERS lm/c) 

• PHANTOM ALIENS irn/c) 

• MAZE OF DEATH (rrVc) 

• PLANET LANDER (nVc) 

• BUG SPLAT (rrVc) 

• BOUNCING LETTERS (m/c) 

• I CHING (basic) 

■ MASTERMIND (basic) 

• BASIC HANGMAN (basic) 

• ROBOTS (basic) 

PROG OF THE MONTH: MAZE OF 
DEATH 

■ ci- are m a ma*e which contains a monster and an 
escape point. Vr>u are shown the distances to the 
monster and the escape point. Dot not their actual 
positions. Can you reach the escape point before 

the monster gets you? 

Side A contains H vernons of these programs. 
Stde 8 contains large screen version, of Invaders 
and Mue of Death roady for whan you g* ȣ 
(Any previous customers wthout side 8 send SAE 
for free upgrade instructions 

All on CASETTE ONE 
(sent 1st class) for £3.80 from 
Michael Orwin, 26 BROWNLOW Rd 
WILLESDEN, LONDON NW10 9QL 



f" L no/com 2 



Graphical Gam** Proflrama 
Star Wars- 32K f 10 00 

Aatrafir* MM fSM 

B'iim Mo Up Scoriy I6K £S 00 



Computer Dert» 
Downhill Shier 
Grand Prl« 
X W.na Sla. Battle 
Alian Bombardment 
Speedway 
Late' Duel 
M*n.n Crossfire 
_0odgemt 



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SK £3» 
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ik aw 



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■ - ftav. P^gren. 



96 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



ACORN ATOM Cambridge based Acorn 
Computers manufactures the Atom 
machine which has a memory capacity of 
2K. but it can be upgraded to 12K. 

It must be plugged into a television and 
is available in either kit form or ready built. 
As a kit it costs £120 for the 2K computer or 
£150 for the finished product. For a more 
powerful system, 12K, the price stands at 
£220 (in kit) and £250 completed. 

Acorn also makes the Systems 1, 2, and 3 
which cost between £69 and £750. 

APPLE The Apple has a solid software 
base for both business and entertainment 
applications. The machine comes with a 
memory capacity, ranging from 8-48K. You 
can buy joysticks and paddles to plug in for 
use with computer games. Colour graphics 
can be used with a colour television. 

The 48K machine costs £695 and is 
obtainable from Apple U.K., formerly Mic 
rosense which is based in Hemel Hemp- 
stead. Hertfordshire. 

ATARI 40OB00 Most of the software for 
the Atari microcomputers are games or 
educational, with business applications 
only recently being introduced. 

The basic 400 with 16K RAM costs £340 
direct from Atari's UK distributors, 
via London based Ingersolt Electronics. The 
32K version sells for £395 Peripherals for 
the machines, like disc drive units and 
cassette recorders can also be. obtained 
from Ingersolt for £325 and £45 respectively. 
The 800 is expandable to 48K and the 16K 
machine sells for £645. 

BBC COMPUTER The computer adopted 
by the BBC to sell in conjunction with its 
forthcoming series is based on the Acorn 
Proton. The BBC has developed its own 
Basic to be used on the machine. Minimum 
memory is 16K RAM, maximum being 32K 
Present plans for the machine are dual 
purpose, both business and games. 
Optional extras include joysticks, paddles, 
disc drives and a cassette for tape loading. 

Price is put at £235 for the 16K computer 
and £335 for the 32K version. 

DAI This is a personal computer made by 
Oata Applications for both business use 
and home entertainment. The U.K. system 
(it is made in Belgium) has 48K RAM as well 
as full colour and sound commands. Data 
Applications is based in Cirencester, 
Gloucestershire. The 48K system now 
costs £595. 

NASC0M There are two Nascoms avail- 
able at the moment, both can be used for 
business and games. The Nascom 2 is the 
more powerful of the two with 8K RAM and 
with a Basic interpreter. 

ft 



It can be bought in kit form and off the 
shelf complete. The kit is £125 for IK RAM 
and £140 for the finished IK product. £225 
will secure an 8K kit. Nascoms are available 
from Warwick-based Lucas Logic. 

NEWBRAIN This is a hand-held computer 
unit which is at the low end of the price 
bracket. For 2K RAM you pay £159 upwards 
and it is expandable to 20K of memory. 
Hobbyists often opt for this machine 
because of its tow cost and it is used for 
general business and for playing games. An 
expansion unit is available which supports 
floppy disc drives, a printer and a visual 
display unit. It is available from the Grundy 
Group. 

OHIO SCIENTIFIC Ohio Scientific (OSI) 
make the Superboard which is aimed at the 
hobbyist market. Its memory capacity 
starts at 4K RAM and is expandable to 32K 
if you buy the add-on board. 

Other machines in this family include the 
Challenger 1 and 4. These are essentially, 
cased versions of Superboard The Chal- 
lenger 4 is the cheapest of these at £575 
and includes colour and sound options. 

PET Made by Commodore Business 
Machines, the Pet ranges from 8K RAM to 
32K RAM. It is used mostly by small 
businesses for general applications but has 
a hefty hobbyist following. It is available 
from Commodore of Slough at a starting 
price of £460 Compatible peripherals are 
available for the Pet, including disc drives, 
cassettes for loading tapes and printers. 

SHARP M2-80K Popular with both busi- 
ness and home users, the Sharp's memory 
capacity starts at 16K and has a top limit of 
48K. It comes with a monitor and a cassette 
recorder built onto the keyboard unit. Disk 
drives are also available. Manchester- 
based Sharp Electronics have a recom- 
mended retail price of £460 for the 48K unit. 

SHARP PC-1211 The smallest computer in 
the Sharp range. Sharp classifies it as a 
pocket computer and it is programmable m 
Basic. It also has a cassette interface for 
loading and costs upwards of £85. 

SINCLAIR There are two types of Sinclair's 
microcomputer available for under £100. 
Sinclair really brought the microcomputer 
into the home The machines are ideal for 
learning the rudiments of computing but 
are limiting graphically. The ZX80 has IK of 
memory and is expandable up to 8K, but is 
no longer in production. The 2X81 sells lor 
£49.95 for IK in kit form or £69.95 ready 
assembled The 16K RAM packs cost 
£49.95. 



; 4AILABLE IN THE UK 



SORCERER The Exidy Sorcerer is a home 
computer with a sizeable games following 
but it is one of the more expensive of the 
microcomputers, costing upwards of £749. 
Memory amount ranges from 48K to 55K 
and there is a plug-in ROM pack for extra 
capacity. Disc drives and visual display unit 
are an additional cost. Sorcerer's can be 
obtained from a Cornish firm, Liveport of St 
Ives 

TANDY TRS-SO Tandy's TRS-80 Model 1 is 
a machine which is often used for games 
and is well-supplied with software for both 
entertainment and business applications. 
Its memory capacity goes from 4K to 16K 
but there is an expansion unit available 
upgrading it to 48K if you want the extra 
memory. The Model I is the cheapest of 
the Tandy range 

The Model 1 costs £459 but comes 
complete with a monitor to use as a V.D.U. 
and a cassette. The Model III is an integral 
unit made up of a keyboard, 12" screen and 
two slots for 5J" discs. If costs from £499 



48K of RAM. The Microtan 65 costs £79.35 
for the IK kit, or £90.85 assembled. 
Tangerine is based in Ely, Cambridgeshire. 

TI-9S4 This computer has recently been 
re-launched by Texas Instruments. It con- 
sists of a separate keyboard with graphics 
facilities in full colour and now plugs in to a 
UK television. Software available for it 
from Texas Instruments is mostly business 
and educational but the firm has recently 
introduced a bundle of games to run on the 
computer. It has 16K RAM and uses tapes, 
discs or plug-in games cartridges. You can 
buy one of these from Bedford-based T.I. 
for £299 

VIC-20 The VIC is the much-publicised 
baby of the range of microcomputers from 
Commodore of Slough At £185 it is one of 
the cheapest. Deliveries to dealers have 
just started. The VIC has full colour graph- 
ics on a colour T.V. and there are joysticks 
available. Although Commodore are plug- 




TANDY TRS-80 COLOUR COMPUTER 

Tandy's latest addition to its range of 
computers is the Extended Basic Micro 
Colour Computer, (or TRS-80 Colour Com- 
puter for Short). It is available with either 
16 or 32K of memory and costs £449. 

The actual computer unit consists of a 
keyboard which can be plugged into any 
television set. It is aimed at both business 
and games users and Tandy has bought out 
o variety of instant loading games program 
packages lor the machine. 

Joysticks to play some of the games are 
extra and cost £17.95 a pair. The colour 
computer can be obtained from Tandy 
stores nationwide. 

TANGERINE Tangerine Computer Systems 
produce the Microtan 65, a microcomputer 
for games and personal use like household 
accounts It comes in kit form and is 
expandable from an initial IK memory up to 



ging the business use of the machine it is 
tipped to be a hot games computer 
because of its colour graphics and low 
cost. 

VIDEO GENIE The Genie is made by 
E.A.C.A. and is a popular games machine. It 
is compatible with the Tandy TRS-80 Model 
t With 16K to 48K RAM there are disc 
drives available. The basic unit costs from 
£369 and is available from Lowe Electronics 
of Matlock in Derbyshire. 

U.K.101 This machine comes in either kit 
form or ready built with memory capacity of 
4K to 40K (with an expansion board). It 
contains television and cassette interfaces 
so you don't need a V.D.U. The U.K.101 is a 
popular computer for playing games and 
there is a lot of software around for it. The 
kit costs £149 for 4K, ready built it sells for 
£199. 



BRIDGE SOFTWARE 
QUALITY SOFTWARE 
KM »OuH 



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IM GALAXY iNVAOf KS i« oatfiifw t>Ma C •«•«"• «•«* 
HumIWUMmOkmOMI fW 

Alia II STATISTICS iDMi 1 t OUATMItS ftl OBI 
IN MIATK1HAPMICS lO Ml 



I SOr IMAM Mil 

m • utNWOOO Htwu moat 
STOCKPORT. CMtBMM Ml W 



TRS80 — VIDEO GENIE 
SOFTWARE 

BREAKOUT: Fast action machine Ian 
guage program; first break through a dou 
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speed increasing at each new level; with 
■kill, control the angle the ball bounces at or 
even swerve the ball as it approaches the 
wall. Only C3 85. or send an s.a.e. tor our full 
list of software at unusually low prices. 

J. T. WILSON 

9 Cotswold Terrace, Chipping Norton. 
Oxon 



4HMEIt 

SHARP MZ80K 48K> OW • VAT 

SHARP MZBOB BM - VAT 

ATARI 400 116*0 OB • VAT 

ATARI BOO 116*1 <*» - VAT 

TEXAS T 1994 042 I VAT 

VIDEO GENIE <16KI tm • VAT 

ATOM Unombiedi t1» - VAT 

• softwsre. books, chm computers 
I Intoilivltion • Acs TV gim»i 

• Sf . Fantasy & Wargames 

BRIGHTON {y^iSi. 



AD INDEX 



82 



A Ij F Softwa'o 
Acorn* oft ....... 

Adda 

Alprav 

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Bus eyte 

Callato Computor* 
Can ot Worms 

Cstronics . 

Compshop 96 & 99 

Compute** lor All . 46 
Computer Keyboards 6? 
Computer Supermarket 

Computer User Aids SO 
Control Technology 93 
Ootid Electronics 99 

DK-trorMcs 10 

Essential Software Co 64 
Gemini ..... .... S3 

Holdco 93 

I be* , 6? 

Jennings 95 

Kansas City Systems 82 

Landau 76 

Laskys .. ?! ft 48 66 
Lowe Electronics 24 



...6 
94 
..46 

i m 

62 
45 



H A 94 

43 

Applies 
48 



Macionics 

Mapkn 

Microcomputer 

lions 
Microgen . 

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Moll mem 
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Program Power 
Qutcksilve 
Sharp Electronics 
Shiva Publishing 
Silica Shop . . 
Silicon Centre 
Siive'sort 
Sinclair 70 Si 71 

Software Houae . 53 
Team 4 Softwere . . 76 
Terminal Connections 13 
Twickenham Compute' 

Centre .82 

Video Serves* (Bromleyl 

S4 

Video Software , . - 97 

Voltmace 76 

Woodland Software 80 



M 
78 
48 
4 

93 
92 
95 
69 
53 
26 
45 
92 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 97 



THE NEW ft 
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MODEL 
III 





48K £619 - vat 

Th* Radio Shack TRS 80™ Model !» rs a ROM baseil 
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• A 12 etch screen to display results end other information 

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<B0M> contammg the Mod** I" BASIC language duHy 
compatible wilh moil Modal I BASIC programs! •flandom 
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nit** iha Computer is on lamouni a e«p*ndab»e from " W 
•o"48K". ouPOn*>««»Bl • A Cassette Interface tor long OT 
»toiaue tit programs and data (requires a separate cassette 
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output of p«og»»m» and data I requires a wW'H" Im* (">* 
opi>on»l'e«iia) • F.spans.on a'ea for upgredWtg la a drsk 
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Dec Drives Kit with 2**0 Track D*rve* 0M8 - VAT 
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WE ARE NOW STOCKING THE 
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AUTOSTART 
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Oettmg Started APPLE M t ■ait*' smaller and more 
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You don't need la be an eipen to enjoy APPLE II II * a 
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Speciei feetu/ee include • Full Sued Keyboard • 
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TV GAME BREAK OUT 



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You rea»y get nooked As 
<«atured m ETI Has also * 
other pmliali games'and talk 
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up gradmg old amusement 
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| MINI HIT PCB sound Et -ision modulator memory chip 
and de code Clsf) Very simp"! to construct C14.M • VAT 
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TANTEL 

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• VAT 



Dernonitslion ave*leb«a 
owe ehowroom 



PR EST El BY TANTEL Ihe greatest th-ig since terevisron b 
tHiephones Communrcat«ons at your t.nge-tips tor business 
Et home '80 000 pages o' up to date information on travel 
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HITACHI 
PROFESSIONAL 
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12" - 



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Sokd stale orcudry using an lC and silicon 
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achreved m t-ctuns center • Stasbse pietursi Even played 
back pictures ol VTR can be displayed wrthout |ine«ing 
• Looping video input Video input ran be looped t tvoug * 
wdh buM-iri termination swdt" • E«te*naJ sync Opeev- 
tton laveilabfcf as option lor U and C lypesi • Compact 
conetructton Two monitors ere moun table side by srd« 
standard 19 inch rat* 



CASIO VL TONE 




i i i 



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It's a new ktnd o* musical instrument A compute* controlled 
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Its 



CENTRONICS 737 
DOT MATRIX 
PRINTER 

onlv £369 u at 

including cables 

Blandaed Featuies 

• BO CPS Proporironal 
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Monospaced Mode •Proportional Spacing Plus 10 CPI 
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System *9B Character ASCII p*us 6 European character 
■ • Microprocessor Electronics • Expanded Print • Right 
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LPM With JO Columns Printed •« Lmes Per inch VsYstCAl 
Spacing • Paper Tear Ba» • Centronix Colours and Logo 





MICROLINE 80 



£299 • vat 



JB0cpsUn.dmset«n« •Small stfe 342 (Wt - 2S4IDI K 
lOBiHtmm • 160 Characters. 96 ASCII and 64 graphics »3 
Character suss 40. 60 or 132 cnenj/line • Fnctton 
and Pin Feed • Low noete 66 dB • Low werght 6 5 kg 



£449 -VAT 

Small sire 360 IW) 
130 mi mm • 160 characters. 96 ASCII and 64 
nth 10 National character set Variants. «4 
Character suss 40. 66. 80 0* 132 chars'sna •Built in 
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• Low noise 66d8 • Low weight Bkg 



MICROLINE 82 

• BO cps B> deectional V>g«c seeking 
■ 321 (Ot 
graphics 



MICROLINE 83 



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• 120 cps tu directional logic seeemg • 136 column printing 
on up to 15m forms •SmaUsae 512 iWI . 328 iDl • 130 
(HI mm •160 characters. 96 ASCI I and 64 graphrcs with 10 
National character set vansnts »3 Character spacingS'S. 10 
and 165 Chars m •Bust in parallel and serial interlaces 

• Frrcbon and Pm Feed • low noise 
weight 13 kg 



• t6« user RAM 
plus extended I2K Microsoft 
: tn ROM • Fully TRS 80 level II 
software comnaMMe •Huge 
range of software already eve-able • Self contained. PSU. 
UHF modulator and cassette • Simply plugs mto wdeo 
monitor or UHF TV • Fu« espannon to dn»s and printer 

• AUsoiuteN complete - lust ht into mains plug 

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only connection to a domest-c 625 Ima TV set lo be fully 
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keyboard. w**ch features a 10 key rollover Supplied w-lh 
tne foMowmg accessories •BASiC demonsKshon tape 

• Video lead •Second caseetee "eed • Users m-nu-i 

• BASIC manual • Banners progtamming manual Ami 
Useful programs m the BASIC computer language yourself 



VIDEO GENIE 
EXPANSION BOX 

Complete with ("S23? interface and floppy dnt 
controller O memory 1235 - VAT 

Memory expansion card 151001 16K C1W 32» fit* • VAT 




I 
I 
( 
I 

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90 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



YOUR ZX80 IS 
NOW NO LONGER 
REDUNDANT 

Upgrade your ZX90 to the full animated graphics 0* 
(he ZX81 INa screen flicker) 

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Works only in conjunction with NEW BK ROM from 
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ZX81 part -exchanges accepted 
GOOD PRICES OFFERED 




ATARI CARTRIDGES 
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now tor 
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COMP PRO MIXER 



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TEAC 
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TEAC FD MA has 40 fecks giving '25* Bun 
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FANTASTIC FOR FILE HANDLING 

ACULAB 
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The iap« that behave* 
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OP* 



FOR THE COMPUKIT Assembler ( d.f». f 14.90 

GAME PACKS - W Four Games ES.0B 2' Foui Gen*., ft 00 3' 'h*ee Games BK only ft 00 
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TTL SALE v " ii '"" n O'de' cs 



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PANASONIC KX-T1520 
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NEC's high Quality punier uses a print thimble that has 
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. VAT 

One of the mosi techrv<a"> advanced telephone 
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cassette system a COO cassette tor incoming calls, which 
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The remote caH ■■> p-O up wilh Playback Reset Repeal 
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Floppy Discs 6V." Haid ««xi Soft Sectoied 



r? 90 



floppy Disc Library Case SK" 



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• long Battery Life 



We give a full one year's guarantee 
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fl*l>on* DPBWO 

DP9600 9501 



Ail fixes eadusne VAT 




A SELECTION OF APPLE INTERFACES 
ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT OUR 
EDGWARE ROAD SHOWROOM 



Delivery is added at cost Please make cheques and postal orders payable to COMP SHOP LTD.. <y phone your orde 
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OPEN (LONDON) - 10am - 6pm - Monday lo Saturday 

S> IRELAND: 19 Meeban Street. Dublin 2. Telephone Dublin 804156 
«k COMPSHOP USA. 13*B Easl Edingei Santa Ana California. Zip Code 92705 
Telephone 0101 714 b*72bX 



TELEPHONE SALES 
OPEN 24 hrs. 7 days m weak 
01-449 6596 




THE ATARI RANGE 




ATARI HARDWARE ATARI SOFTWARE 



400 16K 
800 16K 
410 (Recorder) 
810 Disk Drive 
80 Col. Printer 
16K Ram Pack 



Star Raiders 
Missile Command 
Asteroids 
Chess (Rom) 
Basket Ball 




ATARI SOFTWARE FROM 

Stud-Poker 

Moon Probe 

Alpha Fighter 

Intruder Alert 

Giant Slalom 

Monarch 

Crystals 

Dominoes 

Chomp-Reversi i 

Management Simulator 

CRYSTALWARE 

House of Usher 
Galactic Quest 
Sumer 
Laser Wars 
World War 3 
Beneath the Pyramids 
Sands of Mars 
Little Crystal 
Fantasy land 2041 
Waterloo 
Quest for Power 



DYNACOMP 

16K(C) 

24K{C) 
16K(C) 
16KIC) 
16K(C) 
24K(C) 
24K(C) 
16K(Cr 
24KIC) 



£10.99 
£9.99 
£11.99 
£15.99 
£12.99 
£10.99 
£9.99 
£15.99 
£10.99 
£15.99 



£19.99 
£19.99 
£11.99 
£19.99 
£19.99 
£19.99 
£26.99 
£26.99 
£34.99 
£32,99 
£26.99 



ATARI SOFTWARE FROM ADVENTURE 
INTERNATIONAL 



Adventures 1-12 
Star Trek 3.5 
Sunday Golf 
Angle Worms 
Mountain Shout 
Deflections 
Lunar Lander 
Galactic Empire 
Galactic Trilogy 



AVALON HILL 

B 1 Nuclear Bomber 
Midway Campaign 
North Atlantic 

Convoy Raider 
Planet Miners 
Lords of karma 
Computer Acquire 
Conflict 2500 
Empire of the Overmind 
Tanktics 



24K(C) 
24K(C» 
16K1C) 
16MC) 
16K(C) 
16K<C) 
24K{C> 
24K1C) 
24KIC) 



16K(C) 
32K1C) 

16K(C) 
24KIC) 
40K(C) 
N/A 
32K<C) 
40K(C| 
24K(C) 



f GALACTIC CHASE 

16K cassette £15.95. A fast real time galax- 
ian type game in playing to the fullest ability 
the graphics and sound capability of the 
Atari computer. 



^ Le STICK £25 

Complete range of Atari program exchange 
software no* in stock. Please send 50p for 
detailed catalogue. 



We also carry a large range of software for TRS-80 and Apple computers send 50 p for catalogues. 

(C) - Cassette All prices include VAT 

Trade enquires for software welcome. 
Mail order available all prices include P & P